Community found in the kitchen
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
6d ago
In 1989, my grandmother, Lorraine Braun, began creating a cookbook for my mother, Maurya. For three decades, she handwrote recipes of foods that were significant in our family or the Mennonite community. This recipe book is a central memory from my childhood.    The book’s pages are covered with the ketchup we used to make rib sauce or smattered with oil from sitting open next to the rollkuchen deep fryer.   The book tells the story of our family, but it also tells a larger historical story. Through a collection of recipes that can be traced from the Netherlands ..read more
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Jeep Weekend
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
6d ago
If I’m not careful, I find myself surrounded by similar-minded individuals who are great at reflecting my own perspectives and values back at me. In a society that continues to grow increasingly polarized and tribalistic, the ease with which this can happen worries me. After all, part of what made Jesus’ ministry so dynamic stems from the diverse company he kept.   Just over a year ago, my friend Daniel invited me to join him and his closest, mostly conservative, evangelical-minded childhood friends for Jeep Weekend: a weekend of driving heavily modified 4×4 Jeeps through off-road trails ..read more
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Alberta event explores wild hope for creation
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
1w ago
Don’t get “stuck in rage or paralyzed by fear,” said Joanne Moyer. “[Be] defiantly hopeful, despite the odds.” Moyer, associate professor at The King’s University in Edmonton, was presenting at a Mennonite Church Alberta event called “Wild Hope for God’s Garden.” The May 28-29 event was held at First Mennonite Church in Calgary. Approximately 25 people attended.    Referring to various scripture passages, Moyer showed how all parts of creation are included in God’s desire for reconciliation. “Love for God and care for God’s creation are closely intertwined,” she said.   Moyer a ..read more
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How to disagree with the beloved of God
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
1w ago
Ian Funk remembers the last time he arrived on campus at Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary (AMBS)—how he walked into the guest house late at night and was welcomed by a fellow student sitting at the dining room table. People heard them exchanging greetings and popped out of their rooms. Within minutes, a group of students from North America, Africa and Asia were sitting at the table chatting.   “[It was] an instant family,” says Funk, pastor at Langley (B.C.) Mennonite Fellowship, who graduated from the seminary last year. “We would talk about substantial things because we were ther ..read more
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The urgency of untidy joy
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
2w ago
  I’ve been thinking again about joy.   I know this theme is counterintuitive. The scope of violence and injustice in the world is crushing right now, both far away and close to home, and it’s proving chronic in ways that undermine efforts to be “joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer” (Romans 12:12). We need urgent action on so many fronts, and instead we find ourselves learning to live in long-scale uncertainty. It wears us down.   We’re tempted to become so focused on everything that’s wrong that we fumble around in a fog of sorrowful frustration ..read more
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Open to the Spirit
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
2w ago
Just over a year ago, I invited readers of Canadian Mennonite to share their Holy Spirit experiences with me (April 6, 2023). I was pleasantly surprised by the response. I was moved and encouraged by the messages I received. Thank you to all who responded.   These messages were shared in confidence, and confidentiality is sacred. Although I wish everyone could hear some of the stories people shared with me, they are not my stories to tell. Instead, I want to list the types of “God experiences” many of my Mennonite sojourners have shared with me over the years: Divine healing ..read more
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Long live Ubuntu
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
2w ago
Every Tuesday evening, my five sisters, two cousins and I join Aunt Musa Mashamba for online prayers. Aunt Musa, who recently celebrated her 99th birthday, remains a vibrant and humorous figure, even though she has outlived all her direct siblings.   Despite using a walking stick, she insists on maintaining her independence, making her bed and washing some of her belongings. Aunt Musa is renowned for her embodiment of the Ubuntu philosophy, a Southern African ethos that declares, Umuntu ngumuntu ngabantu—a person is a person because of other people.   She lives it and ..read more
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A church of surprises
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
2w ago
What lies ahead? As I write this reflection, I have just completed my first week as executive minister of Mennonite Church Saskatchewan. Stepping into this role, I ask myself, “What does the future hold, and am I equipped to handle it?”   We are in a time of transition—not just MC Sask but the broader church as well. The church today faces various challenges and many questions about its future. As I prepared for my first days and weeks in the role of executive minister, I reflected on what the future might bring. In some ways it would be easy to throw up my arms in despair and prepare fo ..read more
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Seeking God in a 'thin place'
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
2w ago
I grew up attending a relatively small Mennonite church—Foothills Mennonite in Calgary—with my family. My family was fairly involved in my church, and I grew up with a typical Mennonite faith. However, as I got older my church experience began to shift.   Our pastoral team underwent many changes, and because our congregation was fairly small, my youth group was also small. This meant it was somewhat inconsistent, although I did make fantastic friends through youth. My church has definitely played a large role in shaping my faith, and the group consists of some of the most kind, thoughtfu ..read more
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Windsor church addresses toxic drug crisis
Canadian Mennonite Magazine
by Ad Rep
2w ago
Rielly McLaren says the grief caused by toxic drug deaths feels staggering and palpable in his community. McLaren, who pastors Windsor Mennonite Fellowship, also serves as chaplain to men transitioning into new communities after completing prison sentences. The toxic drug crisis has hit both those communities.   McLaren was one of five clergy from Windsor, Timmins, Sudbury and Barrie, Ontario, who wrote a May 10 open letter to the government of Ontario urging funding of the safe consumption sites currently awaiting funding in their cities. Applications for funding were submitted 15 to 32 ..read more
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