Answers to FAQs from our 2/19/24 webinar on biomarkers in multiple myeloma
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Heather Steiger
4d ago
What is non-secretory multiple myeloma? In most cases, myeloma cells release monoclonal antibodies (M-protein) into your blood and urine. In rare cases, myeloma cells do not make any monoclonal antibodies, a condition called non-secretory myeloma. It can be difficult to diagnose patients with non-secretory myeloma because they have no M spike.  While treatment for non-secretory myeloma is often the same as for other types of myeloma, it is more difficult to monitor treatment efficacy since doctors cannot use a simple blood test to detect the M protein. If a clonoSEQ minimal residual disea ..read more
Visit website
Answers to FAQs from our 2/14/24 webinar on bispecific antibodies in multiple myeloma
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Heather Steiger
4d ago
Does the age of the patient play a role in whether a patient can receive a bispecific antibody? The age and the performance status of the patient play a role in determining which treatment is selected. Someone who is frail and/or has a poor performance status may be better suited for a bispecific antibody. Whereas a younger patient with a good performance status could be a better candidate for CAR T-cell therapy. There is currently no limit on the age of a patient who can receive bispecific antibody therapy.  Healthcare professionals should have a discussion with the patient to see what i ..read more
Visit website
Meet team “Richard’s Rangers” in honor of Richard A. Englander MMRF 2024 Walk/Run: Philadelphia Spirit of Hope Honoree
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Sarah Strong
2w ago
How did you get involved with the MMRF? Our “Richard’s Rangers” team was formed by our family for the MMRF Race for Research in Philadelphia in 2010 as a way to honor our husband, father, and grandfather, Richard A. Englander and fundraise and spread awareness for the disease. Richard was a patient of Dr. Edward Stadtmauer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had told Richard about the wonderful work of the MMRF to educate patients and caregivers and to fund important research to find a cure. We have been supporting the MMRF ever since! Why did you choose to participate in t ..read more
Visit website
MMRF Research Update: Key Study Looks to CoMMpass to Inform a New Prognostic Model
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Heather Steiger
1M ago
Multiple myeloma is a complex cancer, different in every patient. This complexity makes it difficult to predict what therapy will work best for each patient. Knowing a patient’s prognosis at the time of their diagnosis can help their care team decide which therapy would be most effective for first line treatment. Differences in myeloma in each patient can be traced back to the complex DNA changes (also known as the “genomic landscape”) in each patient’s myeloma cells. This information can only be measured in tumor cells collected during the bone marrow biopsy. Researchers have long looked to c ..read more
Visit website
Meet Christine’s Crusaders, MMRF 2024 Walk/Run: Atlanta Spirit of Hope Honoree
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Sarah Strong
1M ago
How did you get involved with the MMRF? My sister, Christine Serra, was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in September 2007. The next year when I ran the Chicago Marathon, I decided to fundraise for the MMRF and have been continuing to fundraise ever since. Why did you choose to participate in the MMRF Walk/Run? Soon after Christine was diagnosed, we formed Christine’s Crusaders. A large group of friends and family came out year after year to run and walk alongside her while she battled myeloma for six years. The MMRF gives so much of what is fundraised to research. While Christine passed away ..read more
Visit website
Meet MaryLee Millard, MMRF 2024 Walk/Run: San Francisco Spirit of Hope Honoree
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Sarah Strong
1M ago
How did you get involved with the MMRF? Dennis and I didn’t always have cancer. We were in the middle of a sailing circumnavigation, when I first started noticing how fatigued Dennis was getting. I would think that’s how I will feel someday when I get to be Dennis’s age (we were ten years apart in age). And then I noticed that we were both losing weight, but I thought that was from a healthy lifestyle living off the grid. But then I started getting fatigued too, which I attributed to the fact that I was doing more of the sailing and chores because Dennis was so tired and taking more naps. All ..read more
Visit website
Meet Valerie Malsch, MMRF 2024 Walk/Run: New York City Spirit of Hope Honoree
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Sarah Strong
1M ago
How did you get involved with the MMRF? On April 26, 2017, I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. After an initial round of treatment, I had a stem cell transplant and have been on Darzalex ever since. I am lucky and grateful to be MRD negative and to have access to the best myeloma specialists and drugs. Since being diagnosed, I have had seven more birthdays, enjoyed my summers, played tons of canasta, taken family trips to Mexico and romantic trips abroad, and celebrated several high school and college graduations. Jeff and I have celebrated seven more wedding anniversaries—and this year, w ..read more
Visit website
Meet Tom Mihelcic, MMRF 2024 Walk/Run: Chicago Spirit of Hope Honoree
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Sarah Strong
1M ago
How did you get involved with the MMRF? My journey began 17 years ago. I remember it like it was yesterday. I was on a ski trip in Vail; it was my first day of skiing, and I was experiencing excruciating back pain. I did something I would have never even considered; I changed my flight and headed home early. Throughout that summer my golf game declined, and I felt pain with every swing. Come December, the pain was so severe that I ended up on the floor in a fetal position several times. At that time, multiple myeloma did not have the exposure in the medical community that it does today. While ..read more
Visit website
Updates in MM From ASH 2023 for Health Care Professionals—Part 3
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Ana Krupansky
1M ago
Several oral presentations at this year’s American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition highlighted encouraging outcomes in the treatment of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), newly diagnosed MM (NDMM), and relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM). Presentations included updated data on bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) and chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR T)–cell therapy, as well as several novel agents in development. CAR T-Cell Therapy Updates to KarMMa-3 and CARTITUDE-2: CAR T Use in Earlier Lines of Therapy Recent advancements in the treatment of RRMM have been highlighted in upda ..read more
Visit website
Updates in MM From ASH 2023 for Health Care Professionals—Part 2
Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
by Ana Krupansky
1M ago
Several oral presentations at this year’s American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition highlighted encouraging outcomes in the treatment of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), newly diagnosed MM (NDMM), and relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM). Presentations included updated data on bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) and chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR T)–cell therapy, as well as several novel agents in development. NDMM Quadruplet Therapies Adding daratumumab to lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (RVd) for patients with NDMM appears to improve treatment outcomes, accordin ..read more
Visit website

Follow Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR