Review: Henry IV by NY Classical
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1w ago
This summer's Henry IV by the New York Classical Theatre (NY Classical) certainly packs a punch. It has lots of energy and vibrance, showcases some great talent, and highlights the best of Shakespeare's text. But, in some moments, it feels artificial or cartoonish. Not a moment of the show was wasted. The condensing of the script––from Shakespeare's two plays (Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2) into one, 2-hour production––was excellent. The plots and subplots were concentrated so that the action was jam-packed with no gaps in continuity. The show developed and kept up a great mo ..read more
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The Five-Act Structure of Shakespeare's Plays
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1M ago
Newcomers to Shakespeare often ask: is it true that every one of Shakespeare's plays is divided into five acts? The answer: yes.  But that's certainly not where the discussion should end. On the contrary, the five-act of Shakespeare's plays opens up a host of questions, stories, and interesting avenues for analysis. Where did it come from? First, who said that a play should have five acts? Some credit this structure to Aristotle in Poetics (c. 335 BCE). While Aristotle did comment on the breakdown of information in a play, he saw a threefold breakdown: beginning, middle, end. In the begin ..read more
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How well do you know the fathers in Shakespeare's plays?
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1M ago
This Father's Day, find out how well you know the fathers of Shakespeare's plays! Questions appear in order of increasing difficulty. Answers appear at the bottom of the page, below the image. Level 1: Name the Father 1. Whose father appears to him as a ghost?     a) Banquo     b) Richard III     c) Hamlet     d) None of the above 2. Which father is the rightful Duke of Milan?     a) Lord Montague     b) Baptista     c) Lear     d) Prospero 3. Which father believes that his d ..read more
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Scansion Debates of Shakespeare's Famous Lines: Sonnet Edition
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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6M ago
     The GEB is back with a sequel to our popular post, Scansion Debates of Shakespeare's Famous Lines. In that post, we took 5 different lines from 5 different plays and presented and analyzed ways to scan them. Now, let's do the same with the sonnets. The sonnet is printed in its entirety. Below are the scansion options: stressed syllables are marked in bold and underlined, while unstressed syllables appear in plain type. Differences from the previous scansion are highlighted in yellow.  1. "As any she belied with false compare." (Sonnet 130) My mistress' eyes are nothing ..read more
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Review: Shakespeare Crosswords
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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6M ago
 Shakespeare Crosswords: 100 fantastic crosswords themed on William Shakespeare is a stimulating challenge, perfect for those who want to exercise their brains in free moments here and there, but is sold on a somewhat misleading premise.    A Shakespeare-themed crossword puzzle is a great idea: you can imagine that lovers of Shakespeare would take an interest in words and language and would enjoy solving puzzles. Things done well, and with care     A light softcover book, these 100 crosswords have more than enough material to keep you busy for a long time. Great f ..read more
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The Meanings of Shakespeare's Famous Insults
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1y ago
Shakespeare is known first and foremost for his fiery insults. But what do these insults actually mean? Let's take a closer look at seven of Shakespeare's best insults below. 1. Coxcomb The insult "coxcomb" can be found in ten of Shakespeare's plays: All's Well That Ends Well, The Comedy of Errors, Henry V, King Lear, Love's Labour's Lost, The Merry Wives on Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, The Taming of the Shrew, and Twelfth Night. It refers to a vain and conceited man, or a dandy. It is also the name for a jester's cap––so it can be used to call someone a fool (as in King Lear, Act ..read more
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Shakespeare's Sources
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1y ago
What are Shakespeare's plays based on? Did he come up with all the storylines himself? Was any of it true? Find the answers to these questions for 37 of Shakespeare's plays here! The list below is in chronological order by year of first confirmed performance. Henry VI, Part II Shakespeare used several different sources for Henry VI, Part II. These include Raphael Holinshed's The Third Volume of Chronicles (1587), Edward Hall's The Union of the Two Noble and Illustrate Famelies of Lancastre and Yorke (1548),  Richard Grafton's A Chronicle at Large and Meere History of the Affayre ..read more
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What do we know about Shakespeare's lost plays?
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1y ago
It's frequently said that Shakespeare wrote 37 plays and collaborated on more. But 2 of his plays are lost: that is, we know they were written, but no copies of them survive (at least, that we have discovered and identified yet). Let's dive into what we know and what we don't know about Shakespeare's lost plays. * indicates that the original spelling has been translated into modern English spelling for readability. What are they? The two plays are Love's Labour's Won, written before 1598, and The History of Cardenio, written in 1612 or 1613. How do we know they exist? Love's Labour's Won is li ..read more
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Art Inspired by Shakespeare
The Green-Eyed Blogger
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1y ago
One of the marks of a truly great artist is the ability to inspire more art. And Shakespeare is no exception. His plays have given rise to creative projects in all mediums. Here we are focusing on some of the non-written art that Shakespeare has inspired long after his death. 19th Century: Paintings The dramatic pinnacles of Shakespeare's plays are perfect for depiction in a visual medium. Here, let's take a look at some of these paintings, focusing mostly on the 19th Century. The paintings appear in chronological order. 1) The Three Witches or The Weird Sisters by Henry Fuseli This work ..read more
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How well do you know the mothers in Shakespeare's plays?
The Green-Eyed Blogger
by
1y ago
This Mother's Day, find out how well you know the mothers of Shakespeare's plays! Questions appear in order of increasing difficulty. Answers appear at the bottom of the page, below the image. Level 1: Name the Mother 1. Which mother comes to life from a statue?     a) Lady Capulet     b) Lady Montague     c) Margaret     d) Hermione 2. Who is not a biological mother, but a motherly figure, to Juliet?     a) Lady Capulet     b) Lady Montague     c) The Nurse     d) None of th ..read more
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