Exposure to cigarette taxes as a teenager and the persistence of smoking into adulthood
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Andrew Friedson, Moyan Li, Katherine Meckel, Daniel I. Rees, Daniel W. Sacks
23h ago
Abstract Are teenage and adult smoking causally related? Recent anti-tobacco policy is predicated on the assumption that preventing teenagers from smoking will ensure that fewer adults smoke, but direct evidence in support of this assumption is scant. Using data from three nationally representative sources and instrumenting for teenage smoking with cigarette taxes experienced at ages 14–17, we document a strong positive relationship between teenage and adult smoking: deterring 10 teenagers from smoking through raising cigarette taxes roughly translates into 5 fewer adult smokers. We conclude t ..read more
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Information and vaccine hesitancy: The role of broadband Internet
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Sofia Amaral‐Garcia, Mattia Nardotto, Carol Propper, Tommaso Valletti
2d ago
Abstract We examine the effect of Internet diffusion on the uptake of an important public health intervention: the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. We study England between 2000 and 2011 when Internet diffusion spread rapidly and there was a high profile medical article (falsely) linking the MMR vaccine to autism. OLS estimates suggest Internet diffusion led to an increase in vaccination rates. This result is reversed after allowing for endogeneity of Internet access. The effect of Internet diffusion is sizable. A one standard deviation increase in Internet penetration led to around a ..read more
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Do time preferences predict diabetes outcomes? A combined survey and register‐based study
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Kristoffer Panduro Madsen, Trine Kjær
2d ago
Abstract Identifying determinants of heterogeneity in health outcomes continues to be a focus in the health economic literature. In this study, we analyze whether time preferences predict health outcomes in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who use insulin pump therapy to manage their condition. We collect data on time preferences using a hypothetical matching task and estimate aggregate as well as individual-level discounting parameters using the exponential, hyperbolic, and quasi-hyperbolic discounting models. These parameters are then regressed against essential diabetes-related health ..read more
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The impact of the 2014 Medicaid expansion on the health, health care access, and financial well‐being of low‐income young adults
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Christal Hamilton
6d ago
Abstract Prior to the 2014 Affordable Care Act (ACA) expansion, 37% of young adults ages 19–25 in the United States were low-income and a third lacked health insurance coverage—both the highest rates for any age group in the population. The ACA's Medicaid eligibility expansion, therefore, would have been significantly beneficial to low-income young adults. This study evaluates the effect of the ACA Medicaid expansion on the health, health care access and utilization, and financial well-being of low-income young adults ages 19–25. Using 2010–2017 National Health Interview Survey data, I estimat ..read more
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Drink…then drive away: The effects of lowering the blood alcohol concentration in Utah
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Javier E. Portillo, Wisnu Sugiarto, Kevin Willardsen
1w ago
Abstract In March of 2017 Utah announced its intent to lower the legal blood alcohol content (BAC) for driving from 0.08 to 0.05 g/dL. However, this change did not take effect until 2019. We employ a difference-in- differences strategy on Utah counties using neighboring states as controls to test whether this policy change significantly affected the number of traffic accidents or the severity of those accidents. Results show the policy appears to temporarily decrease the total number of accidents, limited primarily to property damage- only accidents. We believe these results may be partia ..read more
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Do physicians' attitudes toward prioritization predict poor‐health patients' access to care?
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Anne Sophie Oxholm, Dorte Gyrd‐Hansen
2w ago
Abstract Physicians often face tight resource constraints, meaning they have to make trade-offs between which patients they care for and the amount of care received. Studies show that patients requiring many resources disproportionately suffer a loss of care when resources are constrained. This study uncovers whether physicians' attitudes toward prioritization of healthcare predicts poor-health patients' access to care. We combine unique survey data on Danish GPs' preferred prioritization principle with register data on their patients' contacts in general practice. We consider different types ..read more
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Efficiency and productivity gains of robotic surgery: The case of the English National Health Service
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Laia Maynou, Alistair McGuire, Victoria Serra‐Sastre
2w ago
Abstract This paper examines the effect of new medical technology (robotic surgery) on efficiency gains and productivity changes for surgical treatment in patients with prostate cancer from the perspective of a public health sector organization. In particular, we consider three interrelated surgical technologies within the English National Health System: robotic, laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy. Robotic and laparoscopic techniques are minimally invasive procedures with similar clinical benefits. While the clinical benefits in adopting robotic surgery over laparoscopic intervention ..read more
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Risk compensation after COVID‐19 vaccination: Evidence from vaccine rollout by exact birth date in South Korea
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Jisoo Hwang, Seung‐sik Hwang, Hyuncheol Bryant Kim, Jungmin Lee, Junseok Lee
2w ago
Abstract We utilize the phased rollout of COVID-19 vaccines by exact birth date in South Korea as a natural experiment for testing risk compensation. People may resume face-to-face social activities following vaccination because they perceive lower risk of infection. Applying a regression discontinuity design based on birth date cutoffs for vaccine eligibility, we find no evidence of risk-compensating behaviors, as measured by large, high-frequency data from credit card and airline companies as well as survey data. We find some evidence of self-selection into vaccine take-up based on perceptio ..read more
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The effect of retirement eligibility on mental health in the United Kingdom: Heterogeneous effects by occupation
Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
by Joe Spearing
3w ago
Abstract I investigate heterogeneity across occupational characteristics in the effect of retirement eligibility on mental health in the United Kingdom. I use K-means clustering to define three occupational clusters, differing across multiple dimensions. I estimate the effect of retirement eligibility using a Regression Discontinuity Design, allowing the effect to differ by cluster. The effects of retirement eligibility are beneficial, and greater in two clusters: one comprised of white-collar jobs in an office setting and another of blue-collar jobs with high physical demands and hazards. The ..read more
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Wiley Online Library » Health Economics
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1M ago
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