Mooooving Day – Transhumance and the Impact on Dairy Cultures
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
1w ago
Mooooving Day – Transhumance and the Impact on Dairy Cultures Presented by Adam Centamore Every spring, Swiss dairy farmer Béat Piller escorts his 56 cows up the slope of the 6,000-foot Alp Vounetz to a grazing pasture and hand-built stable. They will stay there for the next six months, making milk and cheese every single day. In late autumn, they will descend back down to the valley where his family lives year-round. It’s a routine that has existed for millenia. This seasonal shifting, called transhumance, is not uniquely Swiss. Similar journeys are found in Italy, Argentina, France, Brazil…p ..read more
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Truffles with Susi Gott Séguret
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
3w ago
Truffles Presented by Susi Gott Séguret Nature’s most lauded culinary treasures—are subterranean fungi with magical properties which bring new dimensions to countless dishes. Cooking with Truffles: A Chef’s Guide demystifies the truffle for the professional and the home chef, with over 150 unique and tantalizing recipes to suit every palate and occasion, featuring a variety of recipes, ranging from the simple to the sublime. And if you should happen to find yourself without a truffle in your pantry, the recipes stand well on their own! Join author Susi Gott Séguret on Tuesday evening, January ..read more
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People's Place: Soul Food Restaurants & the Civil Rights Era
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
1M ago
Soul Food Restaurants & the Civil Rights Era Presented by Dave Hoekstra and Paul Nathin Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. loved the fried catfish and lemon icebox pie at Memphis’s Four Way restaurant. Beloved nonagenarian chef Leah Chase introduced George W. Bush to baked cheese grits and scolded Barack Obama for putting Tabasco sauce on her gumbo at New Orleans’s Dooky Chase’s. When SNCC leader Stokely Carmichael asked Ben’s Chili Bowl owners Ben and Virginia Ali to keep the restaurant open during the 1968 Washington, DC, riots, they obliged, feeding police, firefighters, and student activists a ..read more
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Last Kitchen Tour at the Butz House, March 22, 2015
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
1M ago
Last Kitchen Tour at the Butz House, March 22, 2015 Conducted by Leah Axelrod Leah Axelord, charter member and ex-president of the Highland Park Historical Society, conducts the last tour of the period kitchen before the museum closed. Recorded at the Highland Park Historical Society on March 22, 2015. www.HighlandParkHistory.org ..read more
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The Turkey, An American Story
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
1M ago
The Turkey, An American Story Andrew F. Smith “Talking turkey” about the bird you thought you knew. Fondly remembered as the centerpiece of family Thanksgiving reunions, the turkey is a cultural symbol as well as a multi-billion dollar industry. As a bird, dinner, commodity, and as a national icon, the turkey has become as American as the bald eagle (with which it actually competed for supremacy on national insignias). Food historian Andrew F. Smith’s sweeping and multifaceted history of Meleagris gallopavo separates fact from fiction. Smith presents the turkey in ten courses, beginning with t ..read more
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Rose Levy Beranbaum: The Cookie Bible
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
2M ago
Rose Levy Beranbaum: The Cookie Bible Her work can certainly be described as “biblical.” And Rose Levy Beranbaum is certainly one of the most sacred figures in all of cookbook publishing. Please join us as Rose delivers a sweet sermon about her latest scripture, The Cookie Bible. And she’ll do a lot more than tell us how a cookie crumbles. Just sit tight in your pew as Rose regales us with crisp comments about cookie history, her own history, and then preaches baking tips that will save your soul. And be sure to offer your kitchen questions to Rose. Her answers will surely prove to be a blessi ..read more
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Chinese Home Cooking with The Woks of Life
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
2M ago
Chinese Home Cooking with The Woks of Life Sarah and Kaitlin Leung For much of recent memory, Chinese food was largely the domain of restaurant kitchens or behind the closed doors of Chinese households—foreign at times even to younger generations wanting to recreate the tastes of home. Today, Chinese home cooking in America is excitingly in flux. Never before has Chinese food been so present in our home kitchens. Along with their parents, Sarah and Kaitlin Leung run the popular Chinese cooking blog The Woks of Life, which has helped fuel the popularity of Chinese home cooking. In this virtual ..read more
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Naomi Duguid, A Salty Talk
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
2M ago
Naomi Duguid, A Salty Talk “Salt”, as Naomi Duguid says, “is the only food we all need.” Come join us as this award-winning writer takes a deep dive into the miracle of salt and its essential role in preserving, fermenting, and transforming food. And she will dish out a generous serving of salt history, harvesting methods and recipes as she quotes from her just-published book, The Miracle of Salt. “In pre-modern times, access to salt in various forms depended on geography and politics: wars were fought over access,” she says. “Humans around the world have used salt as an essential tool for sur ..read more
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The Secret House: Fungi in the Built Environment
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
3M ago
The Secret House Fungi in the Built Environment Presented by Keith Seifert Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6 We often overlook the built environment as a biological system, partly because we design our shelters to protect us from the climate and competing organisms. Houses and other buildings contain several sub-environments, which vary from location to location. The outer walls and roof, the wooden or metal skeletons that support the structures, the interior surfaces and flooring each have their own distinct mycota. Material introduced into the house ..read more
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Savoring Appalachia
Culinary Historians of Chicago
by CulinaryHistory
3M ago
Savoring Appalachia Susi Gott Séguret When asked which cuisine most typifies America, chefs are bound to tell you it stems from the South. From the luscious belly of our nation, the mountains where sweet corn is grown and the rivers where trout flashes its rainbow colors, all the way down to the Mississippi Delta, the South has a gift for capturing both our hearts and our taste buds. If the South is the heart of America, Appalachia is the heart of the South. It has been said that to understand America, you must first understand Appalachia. Edgar Allen Poe preferred Appalachia to America as a n ..read more
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