Universal API Access from Postgres and SQLite
O’Reilly
by Jon Udell
1d ago
In “SQL: The Universal Solvent for REST APIs” we saw how Steampipe’s suite of open source plug-ins that translate REST API calls directly into SQL tables. These plug-ins were, until recently, tightly bound to the open source engine and to the instance of Postgres that it launches and controls. That led members of the Steampipe community to ask: “Can we use the plug-ins in our own Postgres databases?” Now the answer is yes—and more—but let’s focus on Postgres first. NOTE: Each Steampipe plugin ecosystem is now also a standalone foreign-data-wrapper extension for Postgres, a ..read more
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Corporate Responsibility in the Age of AI
O’Reilly
by Laura Baldwin and Mike Loukides
1w ago
Since its release in November 2022, almost everyone involved with technology has experimented with ChatGPT: students, faculty, and professionals in almost every discipline. Almost every company has undertaken AI projects, including companies that, at least on the face of it, have “no AI” policies. Last August, OpenAI stated that 80% of Fortune 500 companies have ChatGPT accounts. Interest and usage have increased as OpenAI has released more capable versions of its language model: GPT-3.5 led to GPT-4 and multimodal GPT-4V, and OpenAI has announced an Enterprise service with better guarantees f ..read more
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The OpenAI Endgame
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides
2w ago
Since The New York Times sued OpenAI for infringing its copyrights by using Times content for training, everyone involved with AI has been wondering about the consequences. How will this lawsuit play out? And, more importantly, how will the outcome affect the way we train and use large language models? There are two components to this suit. First, it was possible to get ChatGPT to reproduce some Times articles, very close to verbatim. That’s fairly clearly copyright infringement, though there are still important questions that could influence the outcome of the case. Reproducing The New York T ..read more
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Radar Trends to Watch: February 2024
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides
3w ago
2024 started with yet more AI: a small language model from Microsoft, a new (but unnamed) model from Meta that competes with GPT-4, and a text-to-video model from Google that claims to be more realistic than anything yet. Research into security issues has also progressed—unfortunately, discovering more problems than solutions. A common thread in several recent attacks has been to use embeddings: an attacker discovers innocuous text or images that happen to have an embedding similar to words describing actions that aren’t allowed. These innocuous inputs easily get by filters designed to prevent ..read more
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Technology Trends for 2024
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides
1M ago
This has been a strange year. While we like to talk about how fast technology moves, internet time, and all that, in reality the last major new idea in software architecture was microservices, which dates to roughly 2015. Before that, cloud computing itself took off in roughly 2010 (AWS was founded in 2006); and Agile goes back to 2000 (the Agile Manifesto dates back to 2001, Extreme Programming to 1999). The web is over 30 years old; the Netscape browser appeared in 1994, and it wasn’t the first. We think the industry has been in constant upheaval, but there have been relatively few ..read more
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I Actually Chatted with ChatGPT
O’Reilly
by Philip Guo
1M ago
ChatGPT was released just over a year ago (at the end of November 2022), and countless people have already written about their experiences using it in all sorts of settings. (I even contributed my own hot take last year with my O’Reilly Radar article Real-Real-World Programming with ChatGPT.) What more is left to say by now? Well, I bet very few of those people have actually chatted with ChatGPT. And by “chat” I mean the original sense of the word—to hold a back-and-forth verbal conversation with it just like how you would chat with a fellow human being. I recently chatted with ChatGPT, and I ..read more
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Can Language Models Replace Compilers?
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides
1M ago
Kevlin Henney and I recently discussed whether automated code generation, using some future version of GitHub Copilot or the like, could ever replace higher-level languages. Specifically, could ChatGPT N (for large N) quit the game of generating code in a high-level language like Python, and produce executable machine code directly, like compilers do today? It’s not really an academic question. As coding assistants become more accurate, it seems likely to assume that they will eventually stop being “assistants” and take over the job of writing code. That will be a big change for professional p ..read more
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Radar Trends to Watch: January 2024
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides
1M ago
More large language models. Always more large language models. Will the new year be any different? But there is a difference in this month’s AI news: there’s an emphasis on tools that make it easy for users to use models. Whether it’s just tweaking a URL so you can ask questions of a paper on arXiv or using LLamafile to run a model on your laptop (make sure you have a lot of memory!) or using the Notebook Language Model to query your own documents, AI is becoming widely accessible—and not just a toy with a web interface. Artificial Intelligence Adding talk2 to the start of any arXiv URL (e.g ..read more
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Copyright, AI, and Provenance
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides and Tim O’Reilly
2M ago
Generative AI stretches our current copyright law in unforeseen and uncomfortable ways. In the US, the Copyright Office has issued guidance stating that the output of image-generating AI isn’t copyrightable unless human creativity has gone into the prompts that generated the output. This ruling in itself raises many questions: How much creativity is needed, and is that the same kind of creativity that an artist exercises with a paintbrush? If a human writes software to generate prompts that in turn generate an image, is that copyrightable? If the output of a model can’t be owned by a human, wh ..read more
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Radar Trends to Watch: December 2023
O’Reilly
by Mike Loukides
3M ago
We’re continuing to push AI content into other areas, as appropriate. AI is influencing everything, including biology. Perhaps the biggest new trend, though, is the interest that security researchers are taking in AI. Language models present a whole new class of vulnerabilities, and we don’t yet know how to defend against most of them. We’ve known about prompt injection for a time, but SneakyPrompt is a way of tricking language models by composing nonsense words from fragments that are still meaningful to the model. And cross-site prompt injection means putting a hostile prompt into a document ..read more
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