Brittney Johnson is Spellbinding
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
21h ago
Brittney Johnson is an accomplished actor, artist, and the first Black woman to play the title role of “Glinda” in the Broadway musical Wicked. She brings an exhilarating and sincere performance to any character she portrays. Brittney made Broadway History by being the first Black Woman to play the title role of “Glinda”, in Wicked on Broadway. You can watch this spellbinding performance for yourself, live, through February 12, 2023 at The Gershwin Theatre in New York City. Johnson, who has also appeared on Broadway in Les Misérables, Motown, Sunset Boulevard, Beautiful: Th ..read more
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Florida Attacks Black Studies
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
21h ago
In January, Florida's Department of Education rejected an Advanced Placement course in African American studies. Governor Ron Desantis called the course curricula "indoctrination." This move is in line with the state’s Stop Woke Act of 2022, which assumes that Critical Race Theory is running rampant throughout politics and education, that programs focused on race and diversity are discriminatory, and that strictly limits how topics like racism in American history can be discussed in Florida classrooms.  We speak with John Diamond ..read more
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Preparing for War: The Extremist History of White Christian Nationalism and What Comes Next
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
5d ago
Brad Onishi is a professor of religion and a former evangelical Christian. As he watched the January 6, 2021 insurrection in progress, he wondered: “would I have been there?” That experience is the lens through which he explores history and the future in his new book: “Preparing for War: The Extremist History of White Christian Nationalism — and What Comes Next.”  ..read more
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Davante Lewis is Louisiana's First Openly LGBTQ+ Public Commissioner
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
6d ago
This Black History Month, Black.Queer.Rising. is back! We are profiling Black and Queer politicians/changemakers, artists, influencers, and more in this month-long series where we honor the impact of Black Queer legacies on today’s society and culture while we forge Black Queer futures. For our first edition, we speak to Davante Lewis, Public Commissioner for Lousiana’s Third District. Lewis is the first Black, openly LGBTQ+ person elected to Louisiana's state government. We spoke with him about holding political office, representation, and what Black.Queer.Rising means to him ..read more
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Child Poverty Was Cut In Half-- Why Stop Now?
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
6d ago
SNAP or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, is one of the most critical policy tools we have to address hunger and poverty in the U-S. And during the pandemic, it was a literal lifeline.  Congress temporarily increased SNAP benefits giving a boost of 15 percent to everyone who needed it and allowing all families to max out their eligibility based on the size of the family.  This month, the nearly three-year boost to a benefit used by more than 41 million Americans will end.  And now that a carton of eggs costs about as much as c ..read more
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The Future of Police Abolition
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
6d ago
On January 7, Memphis Police officers pepper sprayed and brutally beat photographer and avid skateboarder Tyre Nichols. Nichols complained of shortness of breath, and waited 22 minutes before an ambulance arrived to transport him – in critical condition – to a local hospital. He died on January 10. Memphis police chief Ceralyn Davis called the beating of Nichols a “failure of basic humanity.”  This brutal killing has renewed public discussions of police abolition. We talk with Professor Christian Davenport, professor of political science at The University of ..read more
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His Name Was Tyre Nichols
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
1w ago
His name was Tyre Nichols.  He was 29 years old, the youngest of four children. Father to a 4-year-old son. Tyree loved to skateboard. He was just 80 yards away from his mother’s house when he was stopped by Memphis police. Tyre called out to his mother as he was being beaten by five Memphis police officers.  On the evening of January 7, Memphis police stopped Tyre while he was driving. Initially, the police report indicated Tyre was stopped for reckless driving. But after extensive, initial review the Memphis chief of police indicated there was no ..read more
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Transformative Takeaway: Saving NOLA's Bike Share Program
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
1w ago
New Orleans launched their bike share program, Blue Bikes, in 2017 in partnership with a for-profit bike share company called Social Bicycles, beginning with 700 pedal bicycles. Geoff Coats was hired to run the program.  Soon after, Uber bought out Social Bicycles (which by then had changed its name to Jump) and Blue Bikes flourished: by 2020, the fleet size was upgraded and almost doubled to 1,350 pedal assist e-bikes. But then, the pandemic hit. Uber paused the program, and then spun it off to Lime, a scooter company and competitor.  Lime, using the bikes as leverage, approach ..read more
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Reflecting on History and Remembering Victims on International Holocaust Remembrance Day
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
1w ago
January 27th marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On this day in 1945, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp, was liberated. The Remembrance Day is a day to commemorate the 6 million Jewish lives that were lost at the hands of the Nazi German regime, and the millions of other Europeans the Nazis saw as racially inferior. This included Soviet prisoners of war, Roma and Sinti populations, people with disabilities, and Polish people.But this commemoration of 78 years since the end of World War II can’t be separated from the fact that recently some high prof ..read more
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Why Titus Kaphar Won't "Shut Up and Paint"
The Takeaway | WNYC Studios
by WNYC and PRX
1w ago
The paintings produced by artist Titus Kaphar have become some of the most coveted pieces of art in America. His paintings – which reimagine the people included in American history – are displayed in museums from Seattle to New York City, and at auction, they’ve fetched hundreds of thousands of dollars. But the message of the Michigan-born artist’s work – which critically examines how art historically excludes Black and Brown faces – is a source of discomfort for many art collectors, dealers, and museums in the U.S. And despite pressure to keep his artwork apolitical, Titus says his ..read more
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