The easiest way to fix a broken story according to Jed Herne
Thanet Creative
by Guest Writer
3w ago
Jed Herne breaks his solution down into three stages: Character arc The three Ps Theme Character Arc There are five aspects to a character arc that Herne addresses: What do they want? What do they need? What is the lie they believe? What is the truth they must come to accept? What is their ghost? The Three Ps Promise Progress Payoff Theme The moral core of your story that characters must either accept or reject. This does not have to be explicit. This post The easiest way to fix a broken story according to Jed Herne was first published on Thanet Creative exclusively. It was written by G ..read more
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First Writers’ Meet and Critique Evening of 2024
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
1M ago
This Thursday, come along to meet local writers, have your work critiqued or enjoy a drink at a lovely pub with great food. Large car park and buses stop outside. We are usually at table 8 in The Wheatsheaf Margate. The friendly staff will be happy to point us out. All writers, all skill levels, all genres. We aim to be a friendly safe space where exploration of writing and the writing life are our only focus. For work to be critiqued please bring 4 to 5 copies of 3 to 4 A4 pages, ideally double-spaced with 12-point font (or bigger). Other writers can then write feedback on the page next to yo ..read more
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Neil Gaiman on the antidote to rejection
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
5M ago
In this video, best-selling author Neil Gaiman talks about rejection and how to handle it. This post Neil Gaiman on the antidote to rejection was first published on Thanet Creative exclusively. It was written by Matthew Brown for the Thanet Creative blog. If found on any other site, it was almost certainly stolen ..read more
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My problem with “was”
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
6M ago
The word “was” is an easy fit when writing in the past tense. Along with “had” it is easy to use the word so hard and often that it becomes a distraction. While “was” is a good word and sometimes the right word, there are many times (such as in the example above) when a rewrite will produce a better passage. These edits – to remove “was” – can be hard. You have used the correct word. Why does it need to change? Once a reader notices how often the writer uses “was” every further example is going to be a distraction. Furthermore, the effort to find another way to say the same thing can give you ..read more
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5 hard-won editing tips
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
8M ago
Editing your writing can be a hard process. At least, it is for me. Here are five tips that I think might help your editing and have certainly helped mine. 1. Identify your overused words My overused words include “was” and “has”. By using my wordprocessors find function with highlight all, I get a visual map of where I need to thin down such words. Here are some other commonly overused words Very: Often used as an intensifier “very” is a weak word choice. Try for a more intense word to begin with. Instead of “very sad” you could try “despondent”; instead of “very cold” you might like “freezi ..read more
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A conversation with a journaling coach
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
10M ago
Recently I had a web-based conversation with a journaling coach. I was able to ask questions about journaling and learn more about the art. This is that conversation. What is journaling? Has it been around long? Journaling is the act of regularly writing down your thoughts, feelings, and experiences in a notebook or other form of writing. It’s a practice that has been used for centuries as a tool for personal growth, self-reflection, and creative expression. The exact origins of journaling are unclear, but people have been using writing as a form of self-expression for thousands of years. From ..read more
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25 words most writers should avoid
Thanet Creative
by Jason Latnar
11M ago
In the game of writing, not all words were created equal. Here are twenty-five weak words writers should avoid. I have included stronger alternatives. “Good“: This word is subjective and lacks specificity. It can be replaced with more precise words such as “excellent,” “superb,” “wonderful,” or “commendable” depending on the context. “Bad“: Similar to “good,” this word is subjective and lacks specificity. Consider using more precise words such as “terrible,” “dreadful,” “awful,” or “negative” to convey a clearer meaning. “Big“: This word is vague and lacks specificity. It can be replaced with ..read more
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MixMatched Margate: A Spoken Word Night
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
1y ago
MixMatched: Margate is an inclusive spoken word and performance night taking place this Saturday in Sundowners Bar Margate. They encourage all performers. Any topic and any genre. MixMatched aims to be neurodivergent+ (dyslexic, dyspraxic, ADHD, autistic, OCD, BPD, depressive/anxiety disorder (other)) inclusive. Anyone can come and perform. Tomorrow’s event (25th March) starts at 6pm and will go on until about 8pm. There is a suggested donation of £3 on the door or online. Find out more on the MixMatched Facebook page. This post MixMatched Margate: A Spoken Word Night was first published on Th ..read more
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Word of the Week: Eldritch
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
1y ago
Eldritch is a word meaning something otherworldly, weird, ghostly, or uncanny. Although a fairly old word, Eldritch has had something of a revival being strongly associated with Lovecraftian Horror, Dungeons and Dragons (since Eldritch Wizardry (published in 1976) was written by Gary Gygax and Brian Blume), and horror fiction that takes inspiration from one or both of the other examples. This post Word of the Week: Eldritch was first published on Thanet Creative exclusively. It was written by Matthew Brown for the Thanet Creative blog. If found on any other site, it was almost certainly stolen ..read more
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Word of the Week: Flabbergast
Thanet Creative
by Matthew Brown
1y ago
Flabbergast is an informal verb meaning to surprise someone greatly – to astonish them. Example use: I was flabbergasted when he offered to forgive my entire debt. This post Word of the Week: Flabbergast was first published on Thanet Creative exclusively. It was written by Matthew Brown for the Thanet Creative blog. If found on any other site, it was almost certainly stolen ..read more
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