Seminoles Taught American Soldiers a Thing or Two About Guerrilla Warfare
HistoryNet
by Jon Guttman
1M ago
The word “Seminole” is derived from the Muscogean word simanó-li, or “runaway,” reflecting a common heritage, as Upper Creeks from Alabama, Lower Creeks from Georgia, other affiliated tribes and escaped African slaves all sought sanctuary in Spanish Florida. There they mixed with one another, adapted to their surroundings, traded with Britain, Spain and the United States and came to be collectively recognized as one of the Five Civilized Tribes (along with the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Creek/Muscogee) of the American Southeast. Not civilized enough for some, apparently, for when t ..read more
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This Patient Rider Spent Months Retracing the Pony Express on Horseback
HistoryNet
by Will Grant
1M ago
When the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Co. launched the Pony Express on April 3, 1860, fanfare for the new express mail service made newspaper headlines from New York to San Francisco. The cheers came loudest from California where proponents hailed its commencement as a vital step forward in linking the Far West with the rest of the country. The advertised delivery time between St. Joseph, Mo., and Sacramento, Calif. was 10 days, accomplished by a fast-horse relay. Way stations spaced 10 to 20 miles apart provided couriers with fresh horses, enabling them to carry the mai ..read more
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10 Pivotal Events in the Life of Buffalo Bill
HistoryNet
by Steve Friesen
1M ago
1. Cody Family Moves to Kansas Will was born in Iowa Territory in 1846. In 1854 father Isaac moved the family to Kansas Territory in search of a better life. There young Will watched a wagon train embarking on the Oregon Trail and declared that was what he wanted to do. Three years later, at age 11, he did just that with a freighting operation. It was the first of many such trips. 2. Will Meets the Kickapoos Young Cody’s earliest encounters with American Indians were with Kickapoos who did business at his father’s trading post. Will also befriended Kickapoo classmates. Such positive ..read more
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The One and Only ‘Booger’ Was Among History’s Best Rodeo Performers
HistoryNet
by Richard F. Selcer
1M ago
The horse was once as essential to Western life as the six-gun, and breaking horses was once a necessary skill, even a business for a few tough, enterprising souls. Eventually it became a competitive rodeo event in which working cowboys pitted their skills against wild horses—and each other. The king of the Texas broncobusters was a diminutive fellow named Samuel Privett Jr., known to history as “Booger Red.” While certain details and dates of his life differ due to faulty memories and inconsistent records, the central narrative of his life is consistent—and, oh, what a life he led! Samuel Th ..read more
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The Top Books and Films About Buffalo Bill Cody
HistoryNet
by Steve Friesen
1M ago
Books Buffalo Bill: Scout, Showman, Visionary (2010, by Steve Friesen) This is my biography of William Frederick “Buffalo Bill” Cody, written when I was the director of the Buffalo Bill Museum & Grave. What sets it apart is a wealth of original photographs and images of artifacts and documents associated with the showman’s life, making it equally at home on a reference bookshelf or coffee table. Wild Bill Hickok & Buffalo Bill Cody: Plainsmen of the Legendary West (2022, by Bill Markley) Buffalo Bill Cody and friend James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok were, and still are, often confused wi ..read more
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An SAS Rescue Mission Mission Gone Wrong
HistoryNet
by Gavin Mortimer
1M ago
Norman Crockatt is not a well-known name, but the British intelligence officer was responsible for one of the most controversial decisions of World War II. When the War Office in London created Military Intelligence Section 9 (MI9) on December 23, 1939, it chose the 45-year-old Crockatt to head the new organization. The former head of the London Stock Exchange, he was seen as “the right sort of chap” for the post despite his scant experience in military intelligence. MI9’s mission was to help British military personnel escape and evade the enemy. That might mean smuggling maps and miniature c ..read more
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As the Boxer Rebellion Stole Headlines from His Wild West, Buffalo Bill Put the Clash into His Show
HistoryNet
by David McCormick
1M ago
Fresh from robbing the Deadwood Stagecoach, the Sioux performers of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West changed into loose-fitting Chinese garb and attached long single braids to the backs of their heads, mimicking the clothing and hairstyle of the Boxers then rebelling halfway around the world. Thus was the stage set for the “Western Easterners” to man a wall and defend their position against U.S. Army re-enactors in a scene played out in Cody’s “Rescue at Pekin.” Pittsburgh was the host city this day in late May 1901, and the big-city crowd did not disappoint. As the action unfolded, spectators stompe ..read more
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Could These American Paratroopers Stop the Germans from Reaching Utah Beach on D-Day?
HistoryNet
by James M. Fenelon
1M ago
O n the evening of June 5, 1944, Louis Leroux, his wife, and their six children scrambled atop an embankment near their farm to investigate the sounds of distant explosions. Three miles south, Allied fighter-bombers were attacking bridges over the Douve River on France’s Cotentin Peninsula. In the fading twilight the family watched silhouetted warplanes peel away from the glowing tracers of German anti-aircraft fire that stabbed skyward. When the excitement ended, the Lerouxs returned home to bed, unaware that their farm would play a vital role in the Allied liberation of France.  Their ..read more
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Oscar Wilde Bothered and Bewildered Westerners While Touring to Promote Gilbert and Sullivan
HistoryNet
by Preston Lewis
2M ago
Of all the city slickers ever to venture into the 19th century American West, Oscar Wilde towered above the rest, preening like a peacock with his ostentatious wardrobe, his philosophy of art and his knack for spilling printer’s ink across the pages of Western newspapers. In the parlance of the cowboy, Wilde exemplified the “swivel dude,” a gaudy fellow worthy of a second look or a tip of the hat. The flamboyant poet and playwright not only turned heads with his eccentric outfits, but also left Westerners scratching their noggins over his esoteric lectures on “The Decorative Arts” and “The Ho ..read more
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This Frenchman Tried to Best the Wright Brothers on Their Home Turf
HistoryNet
by Reg Winstone
2M ago
Frenchman Henri Farman was already a celebrated cycling champion, race car driver and entrepreneur when he ordered a biplane from the world’s first airplane factory, Les Frères Voisin. Five months later, in January 1908, he won Ernest Archdeacon’s prize for the first officially observed heavier-than-air flight over a one-kilometer circular course. A week after making Europe’s first flight outside France (in Belgium), Farman lunched with Wilbur Wright in Paris in June. They got on famously; when Wilbur explained his plans to make demonstration flights in France, Farman replied that he had acce ..read more
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