#104 - Privacy Crossroads: Navigating Law, Crime, and Borders, with Gerald Chan
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
1w ago
In this episode, we are joined by Gerald Chan, a privacy and criminal defense lawyer from Stockwood's LLP. We discuss several significant cases and topics within the realm of privacy law and its intersection with Canadian immigration law. Gerald's paper on text message privacy can be found here. Specific cases include: R. v. Bykovets, 2024 SCC 6 (whether police need warrant to obtain IP address) R v. Marakah, 2017 SCC 59 (whether police need warrant to obtain text messages) R. v. Spencer, 2014 SCC 43 (online anonymity) We also discuss the intersection between privacy law and immigration la ..read more
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#103 - Inadmissibility for Organized Crime and Screening Lawyers for Islamophobia, with A. Connie Campbell
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
2w ago
A. Connie Campbell is a lawyer at Edelmann & Co. We discuss inadmissibility for organized crime and answer a question about whether we think that law societies should screen lawyers for Islamophobia or anti-Palestinian sentiments. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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#102 - What Being a Visa Officer Was Like, with Corey Clamp
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
3w ago
Corey Clamp worked at Citizenship and Immigration Canada from 2003-2008. His roles included working as a Litigation Management Analyst in Ottawa, several supervisory roles at the Canadian High Commission in New Delhi and as a Senior Immigration Officer at the Canadian visa office in Ho Chi Minh City. We discuss Corey's immigration career, the importance of overseas offices, refusing applications, the importance of individual personalities in the visa processing process and things that Corey believes members of the public or applicants should understand about the role of visa officers. We als ..read more
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#101 - Cancelling Mexican eTAs, Pepa and Anti-Semitism
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
1M ago
Deanna and Steven discuss the partial visa reimposition on Mexican nationals, the cancellation of Mexican eTAs, IRCC procedures for cancelling visas in general and the Supreme Court granting leave in Pepa. We also answer a listener question, which is whether Canadian visa officials should screen prospective immigrants for antisemitism. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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[Repost] #35 - The Implications of the Supreme Court of Canada Decision in Vavilov
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
1M ago
This episode is a repost of episode 35, which has been our most listened to podcast episode to date. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration) v. Vavilov, 2019 SCC 65 was a landmark 2019 Supreme Court of Canada decision in which the Supreme Court of Canada outlined a new framework for the standard of review in Canadian administrative law. The episode begins with a discussion between Steven and Robert Denay about how the standard of review works. Deanna and Steven then discuss how Vavilov could impact immigration law and practice. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more inform ..read more
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#100 - What Being a Judge is Like, with Peter Edelmann
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
1M ago
Peter Edelmann was a founder of the Borderlines podcast and immigration lawyer who was appointed to the British Columbia Supreme Court in December, 2019. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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#99 - When will Express Entry Points Decrease, with Amandeep Hayer
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
1M ago
Amandeep Hayer is the founder of Hayer Law, a Vancouver immigration law firm. The Express Entry points requirement is currently higher than it has ever been. In this episode we discuss when they are likely to decrease. We also discuss a recent Ontario court decision which struck down Canada's two generation limit on citizenship by descent. Finally, Steve recently listened to a podcast which stated that the following are five signs that a lawyer is not taking their practice seriously. They are: (1) the lawyer answers their own phone rather than having calls go through a receptionist, (2) the ..read more
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#98 - The Ban on Islamic Adoptions, with Warda Shazadi Meighen
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
2M ago
Warda Shazadi Meighen is an immigration lawyer in Toronto and the founder of Landings Law. Canadian immigration legislation states that adoptions that can lead to immigration must create a legal parent-child relationship and sever the pre-existing legal parent-child relationship.Many Islamic countries have adoption, or guardianship, regimes based on kafala law, by which adoptive parents become the sponsor or guardians of a child, but the pre-existing legal parent-child relationship is not severed. As a consequence, adoptions from many Muslim countries are not recognized under Canadian immigra ..read more
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#97 - Statelesness, with Jamie Chai Yun Liew
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
2M ago
Jamie Chai Yun Liew is a Professor at the University of Ottawa and the author of Ghost Citizens - Decolonial Apparitions of Stateless, Foreign and Wayward Figures in Law. In this episode we discuss statelessness, which is when someone does not have citizenship in any country because of the operation of law. We discuss how people can become stateless, citizenship revocation, the Federal Court of Appeal decision in Budlakoti, how lack of documentation can lead to lack of citizenship, challenging statelessness, and more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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#96 - Inadmissibility for Espionage and Chinese Immigration, with Will Tao
Borderlines
by Steven Meurrens and Deanna Okun-Nachoff
2M ago
Will Tao is a Canadian immigration and the founder of Heron Law Office. In January 2024 Justice Crampton, the Chief Justice of the Federal Court released a decision where he ruled that what constitutes “espionage” in Canadian immigration law must evolve “as hostile state actors increasingly make use of non-traditional methods to obtain sensitive information in Canada or abroad, contrary to Canada’s interests.” He held that it was reasonable for a visa officer to determine that a prospective Chinese PhD student, Mr. Li, was inadmissible to Canada for espionage because he may in the future be ..read more
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