#404 Nighthawks and Automats: Edward Hopper's New York
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Greg Young, Tom Meyers, Rena Tobey, Kathleen Motes Bennewitz
4d ago
Within the New York City of Edward Hopper's imagination, the skyscrapers have vanished, the sidewalks are mysteriously wide and all the diners and Chop Suey restaurants are sparsely populated with well-dressed lonely people. In this art-filled episode of the Bowery Boys, Tom and Greg look at Hopper's life, influence and specific fascination with the city, inspired by the recent show Edward Hopper's New York at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Hopper, a native of the Hudson River town of Nyack, painted New York City for over half a decade. In reality, the city experienced Prohibition and the ..read more
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#403 The Fulton Fish Market: History at the Seaport
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Tom Meyers, Greg Young, Jonathan Rees
2w ago
In the 19th century, the Fulton Fish Market in downtown Manhattan was to seafood what the Chicago stock yards were to the meat industry, the primary place where Americans got fish for their dinner tables. Over the decades it went from a retail market to a wholesale business, distributing fish across the country – although as you’ll hear, that was a bit tricky in the days before modern refrigeration. Today its former home is known by more familiar name -- the South Street Seaport, a historical district that has undergone some incredible changes in just the past half century. The fish market, on ..read more
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Rewind: A Bar Named Julius', New York's Newest Landmark
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Hugh Ryan, Tom Meyers, Greg Young
3w ago
New York City has a new landmark, a little bar in the West Village named Julius', officially recognized by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on December 6th, 2022.  Now it may not look like much from the outside, but it's here that one moment of protest (the Sip-In of 1966) set the stage for a political revolution, “a signature event in the battle for LGBTQ+ people to gather, socialize, and celebrate openly in bars, restaurants, and other public places.” So we thought it would be a great time to revisit our 2019 show on the history of Julius'  and a look at the life ..read more
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#402 Treasures from the World's Fair
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Kyle Supley, Greg Young
1M ago
Flushing-Meadows Corona Park in the borough of Queens is the home of the New York Mets, the U.S. Open, the Queens Zoo, the New York Hall of Science and many other recreational delights. But it will always be forever known as the launching pad for the future as represented in two extraordinary 20th century world's fairs. There is so much nostalgia today for the 1939-1940 World's Fair and its stranger, more visually chaotic 1964-65 World's Fair. And that nostalgia has fueled a thriving market for collectables from these fairs -- the souvenirs and other common household items branded with the two ..read more
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Side Streets: Good Diners, Great Pizza and Mars 2112
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Kieran Gannon, Greg Young, Tom Meyers
1M ago
Greg and Tom -- with some help from producer Kieran Gannon -- reflect nostalgically upon old New York City restaurants from the 1990s (Mars 2112, anyone?), wonder what it was like to eat at a chop suey restaurant, praise the strange wonders of Chez Josephine and Congee Village and reveal their favorite places to get pizza in New York City.  --- Here’s the first episode of Side Streets, a conversational show about life and culture in New York City, an exclusive podcast for t hose that support the Bowery boys on Patreon. We’re giving you this preview of the first episode with hopes that you ..read more
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#402 The World Before Wordle: Talking Puzzles With AJ Jacobs
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by AJ Jacobs, Greg Young, Tom Meyers
1M ago
Crosswords, jigsaws, mazes, rebuses, Rubik's cubes, Myst, Words With Friends -- and now Wordle? Not only have people loved puzzles for centuries, they've actually gone wild for them. Every few years, a new tantalizing puzzle comes along to captivate the nation. But each of these little games has an extraordinary history and for this special show, we have the "the puzzler" himself to help us unravel these unique mysteries. Joining the show today is AJ Jacobs, author of The Puzzler: One Man’s Quest to Solve the Most Baffling Puzzles Ever, from Crosswords to Jigsaws to the Meaning of Life, who le ..read more
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#400 Jacob Riis: 'The Other Half' of the Gilded Age
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Greg Young, Tom Meyers
2M ago
In 1890 the Danish-American journalist Jacob Riis turned his eye-opening reporting and lecture series into a ground-breaking book called How The Other Half Lives, a best seller which awoke Americans to the plight of the poor and laid the groundwork for the Progressive Era. Riis exposed more than a humanitarian crisis. He laid bare the city's complacent Gilded Age divide in revolutionary ways, most notably with the use of a new tool -- documentary photography. For our 400th episode, following our tradition of exploring the legacies of urban planners in past centennial shows (#100 Robert Moses ..read more
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#399 The Changing Lower East Side: A View From Seward Park
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Greg Young, Tom Meyers, Chana Pollack, Lynn Harris, Ginna Green
2M ago
To wrap up our 15th anniversary celebration -- and to set up our big 400th episode -- we take a fond look at one corner of New York City which taught us to love local history. Perhaps you know this area for Seward Park, the first municipal playground in the United States, or for Straus Square, named for Nathan Straus, philanthropist and co-owner (with his brother Isidor) of Macy's Department Store. Today, trendy artists and influencers instead spend their weekends in Dimes Square, just one block (and seemingly one world) away. In the 19th century, as Rutgers Square, this area became a small po ..read more
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#398 Marilyn Monroe in New York
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Tom Meyers
3M ago
In the mid-1950s Marilyn Monroe moved New York City in a disguise. She was the most famous woman in the world but she needed a break. The year 1955 was her year of "finding herself," her year of education, rediscovery and reinvention. She intended to spend most of her life here. Monroe -- the biggest movie star in the world when she arrived -- spent nearly all of 1955 in New York City, exploring the city, working on her craft, falling in love and being the toast of the town. But this show is a very different portrayal of Monroe's life.. Recent portrayals of her life have focused on the most sa ..read more
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Rewind: Birth of the Five Boroughs
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
by Greg Young, Tom Meyers
3M ago
On January 1, 2023, New York City will celebrate a special moment, the 125th anniversary of the formation of Greater New York and the creation of the five boroughs — The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. In honor of this special moment in New York City history, we are celebrating a bit early, reissuing our episode (originally #150) on the Consolidation and the formation of the boroughs, with a new introduction. And stay tuned for new episodes of the Bowery Boys Podcast for the rest of the year! ---- Here’s the story of how two very big cities and a whole bunch of small town ..read more
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