Ka Wehena: Aloha Waiahi
Ke Ola Magazine
by Kumu Keala Ching
1M ago
photo courtesy of Karen Valentine Na Kumu Keala Ching Lei hulu mamo ia, kau mai i luna He ‘i‘ini lipolipo i hali‘a ‘ia He aloha e Waiahi Nou ia lei Lei hulu poepoe, puni ke aloha Kū hulu wili ‘ia pūkahi kua ē He aloha e Waiahi Nou ia lei Lei hulu kāmoe, moemoeā ē Moe a‘e wili ‘ia pūlua kūkahi ē He aloha e Waiahi Nou ia lei Puana ‘ia mele i lohe ‘ia Lei hulu mamo ia, kau mai i luna He aloha e Waiahi Nou ia lei Puana ‘ia mai kū ke aloha Nou ia lei o nā kūpuna He aloha e Waiahi Nou ia lei He mele aloha, he mele ia e Waiahi Precious lei honored majestically Cherished one fully remembered Ind ..read more
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Mālama Mokupuni: Caring for Our Island Environment — A Rare Night Visitor: ‘A‘o, the Newell’s Shearwater
Ke Ola Magazine
by Ke Ola Magazine
1M ago
Adult ‘a‘o fly far out to sea to dive for fish and squid. photo courtesy of Alex Wang, DLNR By Rachel Laderman The strange, croaking-squawking calls started in August. Was it a sick chicken? A keiki’s squeaky toy? A lost donkey? I asked neighbors, I did a web search. I stayed up to listen closely: it had to be a bird. The sound came and went. It first called just after dark, flying in from the ocean, and then again at 4:30am, circling for an hour—calling loudly. Finally, I searched the web for “brays like donkey night bird Hawai‘i” and there it was: “‘A‘o, Newell’s Shearwater, 30-to-35-inch wi ..read more
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Building Business with Soul: Compassion and Resilience in Business
Ke Ola Magazine
by Arliss Dudley-Cash, MA, MBA
1M ago
By Arliss Dudley-Cash The last couple of years have been challenging for businesses in one way or another. Many businesses did not survive the shutdowns of the pandemic which makes many wonder how those businesses that did survive managed to be resilient. Resiliency is our ability to bounce back from challenging situations which impact every area of our lives. Often when we think of being resilient, we think of pushing ourselves to our limits and beyond. What if I told you there is a different, more gentle way, to step into resiliency and more easily bounce back from adversity through the sup ..read more
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Medicinal Plants from the Garden—Lemongrass: A Hawai‘i Island Garden Staple
Ke Ola Magazine
by Brittany P. Anderson
1M ago
By Brittany P. Anderson Bowls of creamy red curry teeming with chunks of kabocha squash, eggplant, and green beans quickly leave the kitchen. The cook expertly ladles from an oversized pot, choosing the perfect amount of vegetables and broth while avoiding the aromatic spices floating at the top. The entire restaurant smells of sweet heat and citrus that only increases as the bowls of curry are shuttled to eager diners. Lemongrass is one of the key fragrant spices used in Thai curry and other Asian cuisines. For thousands of years, lemongrass has been flavoring soups, curries, and teas. The p ..read more
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Ka Puana: Auwē Ke Ola ē
Ke Ola Magazine
by Kumu Keala Ching
1M ago
The post Ka Puana: Auwē Ke Ola ē appeared first on Ke Ola Magazine ..read more
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Education on the Ocean: Pua Ka Ilima Treats Keiki to Sailing Adventures
Ke Ola Magazine
by Ke Ola Magazine
1M ago
Captain Ralph, Tobias Perkins aboard Pua on the day of the blessing. photo by Ma‘ata Tukuafu By Ma‘ata Tukuafu It was a 19-day adventure on the open seas for Ralph Blancato and his crew to pilot a 42-foot sailboat from California to Hawai‘i Island. In July 2022, Ralph and his team of three people sailed successfully into Hawaiian waters after traversing 2,200 nautical miles. A mariner with 50 years of sailing experience on the ocean, Captain Ralph said the trip was demanding, but pleasant. Click the cover to see this story in our digital magazine. “It’s not for everybody,” he says. “It can be ..read more
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Sampans, Mahai‘ula Bay, and the Big Bang
Ke Ola Magazine
by Pete Hendricks
1M ago
Aeriel view of current day Mahai‘ula Bay. photo use licensed by dreamstime.com, credit Dirkr By Pete Hendricks Click the cover to see this story in our digital magazine. I was enjoying a pleasant morning one day back in 1996, snorkeling at Mahai‘ula Bay (now known as Kekaha Kai State Park) in North Kona. Just off one of the lava fingers of the reef, I spotted what looked like an old metal rack on the shallow ocean floor. A closer look made me hesitate. The rack contained five drums, which looked like miniature oil barrels, with a hole in the center on each end. From my US Navy service, I recog ..read more
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Beauty and the Beasts: The Art and Craft of Hawai‘i’s Big Game Lures
Ke Ola Magazine
by Ke Ola Magazine
1M ago
Trailing lure skirts are made from vinyl, rubber, or fine iridescent synthetic hair. By Jim Harrold Click the cover to see this story in our digital magazine. If you ever venture on a Kona sportfishing charter, you’ll likely note that the fanciful handcrafted lures trolled behind the boat don’t look anything like common bait for ono, mahimahi, ahi, and marlin. The colorful lure heads, with their large eyes and fluttering skirts, their sparkles and mother of pearl accents, seem more like creatures from another planet than ‘ōpelu, aku, mālolo, and squid—favorite fare of big game fish. Yet, they ..read more
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Kōnea o Kukui: To Restore the Light
Ke Ola Magazine
by Jan Wizinowich
1M ago
An aerial view of Kōnea o Kukui. The pavilion was built in four weeks by recovering community members and Nani’s husband, Don with material passed hand to hand down the trail. photo courtesy of Nani Svensen By Jan Wizinowich With the passage of time, a place becomes layered with the spirits of beings and events that hold the stories and wisdom of those who have gone before. Many may not notice or recognize the spirit of the land, but on Hawai‘i Island, it is still very much alive, if one listens to what Hawaiians call mana. Nani Svendsen is one such person. Along with the hearts and hands of m ..read more
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‘Ohana Wa‘a Laulima: Making Paddling Accessible
Ke Ola Magazine
by Malie Larish
1M ago
Athletes and volunteers celebrate at the conclusion of the first annual King Kamehameha Awesome Athletes Inclusive Canoe Race in June of 2022. By Mālielani Larish On a bright Sunday morning, half a dozen members of ‘Ohana Wa‘a Laulima respectfully hold the hull of a sleek canoe while Kahu (Reverend) Kauila Haumea invokes a Hawaiian prayer of blessing. ‘Ohana Wa‘a Laulima (the canoe family with many helping hands) is one of the few canoe clubs in the state of Hawai‘i dedicated exclusively to giving individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to learn the sport of paddling. Click the cove ..read more
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