Golfers Elbow (Medial Epicondylitis) Prevention & Treatment
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
6d ago
What is Golfer’s Elbow? Golfer’s elbow (also called baseball elbow) is the common term used to describe medial epicondylitis. This sports injury occurs from overuse or repetitive stress to the tough tissue of the elbow tendons and forearm muscles, specifically where they attach on the medial side of the elbow. It’s also a cousin to another popular repetitive sports injury known as “tennis elbow“.  Golfer’s Elbow Symptoms Those experiencing golfers elbow will typically feel pain on the inside of their elbow ranging from the forearm down to the wrist. They may also feel: Weakness in the wr ..read more
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Tennis Elbow Causes, Prevention and Brace Placement
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by scribe
1M ago
“Tennis Elbow” is a common term that refers to lateral epicondylitis, affecting around 1-3% of the population. Whether you’re a professional or casual tennis player, it’s important to know the proper prevention techniques and treatment options to help you take care of your body while playing this common racquet sport.  What Causes Tennis Elbow? The culprit behind tennis elbow is overuse. The extensor muscles in your forearm are responsible for extending your wrist and fingers. Activities like gripping a racket in tennis and pickleball, swinging a golf club, chopping vegetables, or even us ..read more
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The Sacrum Paradox: Keystone or Suspension?
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
3M ago
Why It Matters: The Sacroiliac Joint For proper treatment of our body’s structural core, the sacroiliac joint, it is important that we understand how it functions properly. Misconceptions regarding the interrelationship of ligaments and muscles, the shape and movement pattern of the sacroiliac joint, and other factors disguise many complications and contraindications that make treatment challenging. Is The Sacrum a Keystone or is it Suspended? Whether the sacrum functions as keystone or is suspended from the ilia has been debated for well over one hundred years. In the early 1990s Vleeming and ..read more
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Tensegrity: The Interplay Between Muscles and Ligaments
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
1y ago
  Figure 1 Figure 2 Relationship of structural and soft tissue elements To understand how our musculoskeletal system functions, it is important to understand the interplay between soft tissues, such as the ligaments and muscles, and the body’s structural elements, the bones. This relationship is expressed through a principle called tensegrity (Tensional Integrity). Tensegrity is based on a principle discovered by one of Buckminster Fuller’s students, Kenneth Snelson, who named it “floating compression.” It may be described as a triangulated structure composed of stick-like stru ..read more
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SCREWED: Bilateral SIJ Fusion
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
2y ago
Hilton’s Law[1] forms the basis of the relationship between the structural elements of our musculoskeletal system; it states that the nerve supplying a joint also supplies both the muscles that move the joint and the skin covering the articular insertion of those muscles. The innervated parts of joints consist mainly of three ligamentous structures; the ligaments that hold the joints together, the capsule that encases the joint, and the synovium which allows smooth movement. As the pelvis moves, the ligaments within the two SIJs and pubic symphysis act to both regulate the muscles to ensure sm ..read more
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GOOD POSTURE: A State of Relaxation
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
2y ago
What is Posture?Do you ever notice when you see people with good posture? They walk erect, their heads lifted, shoulders back, their arms swing evenly, and they move with a simple, efficient gait. Unfortunately, most of us have some structural imbalance that causes us to alter our posture. Many people think that by stiffening their back to stand up straight, they are correcting their posture but the tension in their spine will reflect in other places. In actuality, correct posture is a state of relaxation. Posture is the position in which we hold our bodies while standing, sitting, or lying do ..read more
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The Biomechanical Cause of Lumbar Disc Herniation
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
2y ago
During normal anatomical standing, with balanced weight bearing, the spine should not be laterally flexed or rotated. The sacral apex should be neutral, evenly spaced between the right and left ischia. The height of the ilia should be even, with no rotation. If I am correct, this pattern may not exist on any back-pain patients. CLARIFYING SIJ MOVEMENT Balanced Movement In normal movement of the spine, most vertebrae move in unison, in the same direction as the ones immediately above and below. But, in normal movement of the pelvis, there is a significant difference; the sacrum and ilium move i ..read more
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Pain Relief vs Healing
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
2y ago
With joint injury, sprained ligaments initiate a complex chain reaction as the body compensates for the resulting hypermobility. To explain this better, we should consider that ligaments serve two main functions, proprioception and joint stability. Proprioception is a means of sensing the movement pattern of the joint, including direction, speed, and acceleration, and then balance the tension of the muscles to maintain even, smooth movement; this is an essential component of maintaining stability. In a normal joint, at the endpoints of range of motion (ROM), the ligaments not only physically s ..read more
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The Fallacies of the Keystone Form and Force Closure Concept
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
2y ago
Over the past 30 years, I have researched the literature on the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) and matched it to what I found in my patients. In the early 1990s, the keystone concept of form and force closure was introduced by a group of physiotherapists in Europe[1]. They came upon an idea after finding that “A commercial device used in painting ceilings helped us to conceive the concept of the SIJ functioning as a friction joint. This was, of course, scientific heresy since the main characteristic of a joint is its capacity to function smoothly.” They continued “Twelve years later, there is ample ev ..read more
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The Serola Difference in Sacroiliac Belts
Serola Biomechanics, Inc
by Dr. Serola
2y ago
Understanding a problem may do little good if you can’t do anything about it. For this reason, I am taking the helpful step of writing an informational blog that explains the biomechanics behind the development of the Serola Belt. The primary purpose of a sacroiliac belt (aka pelvic belt or trochanteric belt) is to keep stress off the ligaments within the joint; it does this by keeping the SIJ within normal range of motion (ROM). The more the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is kept within normal ROM, the less stress is put on the ligaments, the less the muscles tighten, and less pain is experienced. Th ..read more
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