Stories are now on Substack
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2M ago
The stories are now an archive of writings from 2016-2020, which provide a good base of case studies, investigations, and thoughts. I paused a bit on regular writing but now have begun to provide updated explorations of topics starting in 2024, check out the new substack “Hidden Hydrology” and become a subscriber ..read more
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Restoring Swede Hollow
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
An interesting project in St. Paul, Minnesota emerged in this Star Tribune article “Work could begin soon to bring St. Paul’s Phalen Creek back to the surface,” which highlights the mix of ecological and cultural benefits of urban stream daylighting. Through a focus on both the benefits to wildlife habitat and ecosystem function and the connection of cultural heritage for native people and early immigrants to the area, it shows a rich story that is told through multiple lenses to provide solid rationale for daylighting projects. One major idea of daylighting is visibility. As mentioned in the ..read more
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Landscape and Memory
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
A project from artist Cristina Iglesias (see a post of some of her previous work here) again dives into the idea of hidden hydrology, this time in New York City. Entitled Landscape and Memory (referencing the title of one of my favorite books by Simon Schama), the work unearths a buried stream in Madison Square Park. From The Architect’s Newspaper: “Manhattan is crisscrossed by streams and rivers that have since been buried but continue to flow, flooding their banks and the basements above when it rains. For Landscape and Memory, Iglesias will exhume an impression of Cedar Creek ..read more
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Captured Streams
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
In response to the NY Times article related to the Tibbetts Brook daylighting to boost capacity for sewers and some discussion on Twitter, Adam Broadhead (@losturbanrivers) sent a great 2013 journal article in Water Research, “Captured streams and springs in combined sewers: A review of the evidence, consequences and opportunities” by Broadhead, Horn, Lerner, which addresses the issue with some research. The article is paywalled, but let me know if you’d like a copy and I can email it to you. It’s more of a deep dive into some of the research, but the general thrust is that water intrusion in ..read more
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A Brook in the City
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
The recent article in the New York times on the daylighting project at Tibbetts Creek reminded me, based on some of the comments, of the poem by Robert Frost called “A Brook in the City”. I knew of the poem, but hadn’t really made the connection to hidden hydrology, but the tones of industrialization that . Some analysis of the poem explains the context, as the poem “was written somewhat in early 1920 when history was witnessing Industrial Revolution and urbanization. It was at that time man became an evil and the outcome was the devastation and extinction of nature.” West Running Br ..read more
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Memory Recall at Sumas Lake
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
The connections between climate and hidden hydrology is a continuing theme, and inevitably will result in more examples that can be documented making the connections between present and future impacts and historical ecological systems. Each of these has a specific context, which influences the extent of impacts (urban/rural) and the hydrological dynamics (lakes, rivers, shorelines). The recent flooding in November of this year in the town of Abbotsford, which lies near the border of Washington State and British Columbia is one recent example. The connection was made via Twitter by @tornadodc ..read more
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Clip: Let Water Go Where It Wants to Go
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
A September 2021 NY Times opinion piece “Let Water Go Where It Wants to Go” by one of my inspirations, Eric Sanderson points out the connections between historical ecology and the future city with a simple statement: “Water will go where water has always gone” – Eric Sanderson I feel like I’ve been overcomplicating my explanations of the connections of climate change and hidden hydrology and Sanderson just nailed the concept in a few words. While the explanation is simple, the complex interactions between that hidden (buried) strata beneath the surface that have been erased from our urban are ..read more
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Evolution of Hidden Hydrology
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
2y ago
After bit of a break I’m hoping to write more frequently on all things Hidden Hydrology. For some context, in this time away I have been researching more deeply Portland’s Hidden Hydrology, delving into archives for stories of my local disappeared streams, buried creeks, and filled wetlands around the metropolitan area. I’ve also compiled a composite map of Portland spanning the 1850s through the 1900s to piece together the most complete version of the hidden hydrological layers that existed pre-settlement. I’ve kept up doing research more informally in the broader and mostly sharing on Twitte ..read more
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Lost Waterways of Dublin
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
4y ago
Dublin is another city with a rich history of lost waterways, so as a quick follow-up to the previous post about Belfast, let’s keep the focus on Ireland for a bit longer. The best source for this is a great article by Arron Henderson, “The Poddle and Dublin’s Hidden Rivers“, which mentions that there were over 60 watercourses flowing at one time. While a few remain such as the Liffey, Dodder, Santry, and Tolka – most are either completely gone or mostly underground. Henderson focuses on the Poddle, “…which runs underground for the majority of its course.” The Poddle flows under Bridge and ov ..read more
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Belfast’s Hidden Rivers
Hidden Hydrology
by Jason King
4y ago
A recent article on Belfast’s River Farset jogged my memory that I’ve got a ton of great info the hidden rivers in many cities around the world, so figured I’d start writing about them. For this post, I’ll focus on Belfast, and return shortly to discuss Dublin to round out Ireland, then move on to other locales. As mentioned in the most recent article, “For 170 years, the river that gave Belfast its name has been buried underground in a hidden tunnel.” It goes on to discuss how, similar to many stories of cities worldwide, the river was slowly changed from vital aquatic resource that fueled ma ..read more
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