BI 153 Carolyn Jennings: Attention and the Self
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
1w ago
Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Carolyn Dicey Jennings is a philosopher and a cognitive scientist at University of California, Merced. In her book The Attending Mind, she lays out an attempt to unify the concept of attention. Carolyn defines attention roughly as the mental prioritization of some stuff over other stuff based on our collective interests. And one of her main claims is that attention is evidence of a real, emergent self or subject, that can’t be reduced to microscopic brain activity. She does connect attention to more macroscopic brain ..read more
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BI 152 Michael L. Anderson: After Phrenology: Neural Reuse
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
2w ago
Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Michael L. Anderson is a professor at the Rotman Institute of Philosophy, at Western University. His book, After Phrenology: Neural Reuse and the Interactive Brain, calls for a re-conceptualization of how we understand and study brains and minds. Neural reuse is the phenomenon that any given brain area is active for multiple cognitive functions, and partners with different sets of brain areas to carry out different cognitive functions. We discuss the implications for this, and other topics in Michael’s research and t ..read more
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BI 151 Steve Byrnes: Brain-like AGI Safety
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
1M ago
Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Steve Byrnes is a physicist turned AGI safety researcher. He’s concerned that when we create AGI, whenever and however that might happen, we run the risk of creating it in a less than perfectly safe way. AGI safety (AGI not doing something bad) is a wide net that encompasses AGI alignment (AGI doing what we want it to do). We discuss a host of ideas Steve writes about in his Intro to Brain-Like-AGI Safety blog series, which uses what he has learned about brains to address how we might safely make AGI. Steve’s websi ..read more
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Neuro-AI Course Special Offer (quick announcement)
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
1M ago
Click here to learn more about the course ..read more
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BI 150 Dan Nicholson: Machines, Organisms, Processes
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
1M ago
Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Check out my free video series about what’s missing in AI and Neuroscience Dan Nicholson is a philosopher at George Mason University. He incorporates the history of science and philosophy into modern analyses of our conceptions of processes related to life and organisms. He is also interested in re-orienting our conception of the universe as made fundamentally of things/substances, and replacing it with the idea the universe is made fundamentally of processes (process philosophy). In this episode, we both of those ..read more
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BI 149 William B. Miller: Cell Intelligence
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
1M ago
Check out my free video series about what’s missing in AI and Neuroscience Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. William B. Miller is an ex-physician turned evolutionary biologist. In this episode, we discuss topics related to his new book, Bioverse: How the Cellular World Contains the Secrets to Life’s Biggest Questions. The premise of the book is that all individual cells are intelligent in their own right, and possess a sense of self. From this, Bill makes the case that cells cooperate with other cells to engineer whole organisms that in turn serve ..read more
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BI 148 Gaute Einevoll: Brain Simulations
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
2M ago
Check out my free video series about what’s missing in AI and Neuroscience Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Gaute Einevoll is a professor at the University of Oslo and Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Use develops detailed models of brain networks to use as simulations, so neuroscientists can test their various theories and hypotheses about how networks implement various functions. Thus, the models are tools. The goal is to create models that are multi-level, to test questions at various levels of biological detail; and multi-modal, to predi ..read more
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BI 147 Noah Hutton: In Silico
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
2M ago
Check out my free video series about what’s missing in AI and Neuroscience Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Noah Hutton writes, directs, and scores documentary and narrative films. On this episode, we discuss his documentary In Silico. In 2009, Noah watched a TED talk by Henry Markram, in which Henry claimed it would take 10 years to fully simulate a human brain. This claim inspired Noah to chronicle the project, visiting Henry and his team periodically throughout. The result was In Silico, which tells the science, human, and social story of Henry ..read more
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BI 146 Lauren Ross: Causal and Non-Causal Explanation
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
2M ago
Check out my free video series about what’s missing in AI and Neuroscience Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Lauren Ross is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Irvine. She studies and writes about causal and non-causal explanations in philosophy of science, including distinctions among causal structures. Throughout her work, Lauren employs Jame’s Woodward’s interventionist approach to causation, which Jim and I discussed in episode 145. In this episode, we discuss Jim’s lasting impact on the philosophy of causation, the current d ..read more
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BI 145 James Woodward: Causation with a Human Face
Brain Inspired
by Paul Middlebrooks
3M ago
Check out my free video series about what’s missing in AI and Neuroscience Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. James Woodward is a recently retired Professor from the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. Jim has tremendously influenced the field of causal explanation in the philosophy of science. His account of causation centers around intervention – intervening on a cause should alter its effect. From this minimal notion, Jim has described many facets and varieties of causal structures. In this episode, we ..read more
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