Icelanders reap the costs and benefits of living on a volcanic island and more…
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
1w ago
We now know what happened to a supernova discovered by a Canadian 37 years ago (0:58) A mystery about the ultimate fate of an exploding star has been solved. Canadian astronomer Ian Shelton discovered the new bright light in the sky back in February 1987, and recognized it as the first supernova to be visible to the naked eye in 400 years. In a new study in the journal Science, astrophysicist Claes Fransson from Stockholm University, confirmed that the remaining cinder collapsed into a super-dense neutron star. A vibrating pill makes pigs feel full (10:30) There’s a lot of interest in weight ..read more
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A post valentine’s look at humpback mating songs and a marsupial that’s sleepless for sex
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
2w ago
Atlantic ocean circulation edging closer to potentially catastrophic climate tipping point The stability of much of the world’s climate depends on ocean currents in the Atlantic that bring warm water from the tropics north and send cool water south. New research in the journal Science Advances confirms what scientists have long feared: that we are on course to this tipping point that could cut off this important circulation pattern, with severe consequences. René van Westen from Utrecht University, said if we reach this critical threshold, it could plunge Europe into a deep freeze, disrupt rai ..read more
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Scientists explore which came first, the chicken or the egg, and more…
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
3w ago
Blue whales are genetically healthy but are breeding with fin whales, study suggests (1:03) Researchers have sequenced the genome of a blue whale that washed up in Newfoundland in 2014, and used it to do a comparative study of North Atlantic blue whales. A team led by Mark Engstrom, curator emeritus at the Royal Ontario Museum found that despite their small population, the whales are genetically diverse and connected across the north Atlantic, but that on average blue whales from this group are, genetically, about 3.5 per cent fin whale. The work was published in the journal Conservation Genet ..read more
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An ancient tree’s crowning glory and more…
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
1M ago
Shark declines: finning regulations might have bitten off more than they can chew In recent years governments around the world have attempted to slow the catastrophic decline in shark numbers with regulations, including on the practice of shark finning. But a new study led by marine biologist Boris Worm and published in the journal Science suggests that these regulations have backfired and shark mortality is still rising. The reason is that shark fishers responded by keeping all of the shark, and developing ever more markets for shark meat and oils, such as in supplements, cosmetics, and even ..read more
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The aftermath of a record-smashing volcano: Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai two years later, and more...
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
1M ago
Oil sands produce more air pollution than industry’s required to report, study says (0:54) The volume of airborne organic carbon pollutants — some of the same pollutants that lead to smog in cities — produced by Alberta’s oil sands have been measured at levels up to 6,300 per cent higher than we thought. John Luggio, a research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada, said their cutting edge techniques in their new study picked up many pollutants industry hasn’t been required to track. Mark Cameron from Pathways Alliance, the industry group representing several oil sands companies ..read more
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Could buried hydrogen help save the world, and more…
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
1M ago
*** How history’s largest ape met its end *** For nearly two million years, a gigantic ape, three meters tall and weighing a quarter of a tonne, lived in what is now southern China, before mysteriously disappearing. Exactly why the Gigantopithecus Blacki went extinct has been a huge mystery for paleontologists, especially because other apes were able to thrive at the time. Now a massive study, co-led by geochronologist Kira Westaway of Macquarie University, reveals their size was a disadvantage, and left them unable to adapt to a changing climate. The research was published in the journal Natu ..read more
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A Cave of bones could rewrite the history of human evolution, and more…
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
2M ago
Hurricanes carry microplastic pollution in the oceans back to land Humans communicate in several ways with birds who lead them to honey Bird brains have evolved to tolerate a high-speed impact into water How to make people more easy to hypnotize Unearthing a small-brained hominid species that challenges human exceptionalism ..read more
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Our annual holiday question show
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
2M ago
Questions ranging from moths to mustard, moonlight to migraines ..read more
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Seasonal science with reindeer, special stars and miracle babies…
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
2M ago
Reindeer and arctic seals have complex nasal passages to keep them warm; Reindeer can eat and sleep at the same time; This penguin species sleeps by taking about 14,000 micronaps each day; ‘Naked’ stars are stripped by their partners before they explode; Miracle babies in bags: How close are we to an artificial womb?; Why don’t any deer's legs freeze ..read more
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The Quirks & Quarks holiday book show!
Quirks and Quarks
by CBC
2M ago
How studying long-lived animals might give us the key to longer, healthier life; Looking deep inside planets, under our feet and out there in space; Honouring the overlooked legacies of women in science ..read more
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