TinyAgent: Function Calling at the Edge
BAIR
by
2w ago
The ability of LLMs to execute commands through plain language (e.g. English) has enabled agentic systems that can complete a user query by orchestrating the right set of tools (e.g. ToolFormer, Gorilla). This, along with the recent multi-modal efforts such as the GPT-4o or Gemini-1.5 model, has expanded the realm of possibilities with AI agents. While this is quite exciting, the large model size and computational requirements of these models often requires their inference to be performed on the cloud. This can create several challenges for their widespread adoption. First and foremost, uploa ..read more
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Modeling Extremely Large Images with xT
BAIR
by
3M ago
As computer vision researchers, we believe that every pixel can tell a story. However, there seems to be a writer’s block settling into the field when it comes to dealing with large images. Large images are no longer rare—the cameras we carry in our pockets and those orbiting our planet snap pictures so big and detailed that they stretch our current best models and hardware to their breaking points when handling them. Generally, we face a quadratic increase in memory usage as a function of image size. Today, we make one of two sub-optimal choices when handling large images: down-sampling or cr ..read more
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2024 BAIR Graduate Directory
BAIR
by
3M ago
Every year, the Berkeley Artificial Intelligence Research (BAIR) Lab graduates some of the most talented and innovative minds in artificial intelligence and machine learning. Our Ph.D. graduates have each expanded the frontiers of AI research and are now ready to embark on new adventures in academia, industry, and beyond. These fantastic individuals bring with them a wealth of knowledge, fresh ideas, and a drive to continue contributing to the advancement of AI. Their work at BAIR, ranging from deep learning, robotics, and natural language processing to computer vision, security, and much more ..read more
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The Shift from Models to Compound AI Systems
BAIR
by
4M ago
AI caught everyone’s attention in 2023 with Large Language Models (LLMs) that can be instructed to perform general tasks, such as translation or coding, just by prompting. This naturally led to an intense focus on models as the primary ingredient in AI application development, with everyone wondering what capabilities new LLMs will bring. As more developers begin to build using LLMs, however, we believe that this focus is rapidly changing: state-of-the-art AI results are increasingly obtained by compound systems with multiple components, not just monolithic models. For example, Google’s AlphaC ..read more
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Ghostbuster: Detecting Text Ghostwritten by Large Language Models
BAIR
by
7M ago
The structure of Ghostbuster, our new state-of-the-art method for detecting AI-generated text. Large language models like ChatGPT write impressively well—so well, in fact, that they’ve become a problem. Students have begun using these models to ghostwrite assignments, leading some schools to ban ChatGPT. In addition, these models are also prone to producing text with factual errors, so wary readers may want to know if generative AI tools have been used to ghostwrite news articles or other sources before trusting them. What can teachers and consumers do? Existing tools to detect AI-generated t ..read more
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Asymmetric Certified Robustness via Feature-Convex Neural Networks
BAIR
by
7M ago
Asymmetric Certified Robustness via Feature-Convex Neural Networks TLDR: We propose the asymmetric certified robustness problem, which requires certified robustness for only one class and reflects real-world adversarial scenarios. This focused setting allows us to introduce feature-convex classifiers, which produce closed-form and deterministic certified radii on the order of milliseconds. Figure 1. Illustration of feature-convex classifiers and their certification for sensitive-class inputs. This architecture composes a Lipschitz-continuous feature map $\varphi$ with a learned convex functio ..read more
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Goal Representations for Instruction Following
BAIR
by
8M ago
Goal Representations for Instruction Following A longstanding goal of the field of robot learning has been to create generalist agents that can perform tasks for humans. Natural language has the potential to be an easy-to-use interface for humans to specify arbitrary tasks, but it is difficult to train robots to follow language instructions. Approaches like language-conditioned behavioral cloning (LCBC) train policies to directly imitate expert actions conditioned on language, but require humans to annotate all training trajectories and generalize poorly across scenes and behaviors. Meanwhile ..read more
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Rethinking the Role of PPO in RLHF
BAIR
by
8M ago
Rethinking the Role of PPO in RLHF TL;DR: In RLHF, there’s tension between the reward learning phase, which uses human preference in the form of comparisons, and the RL fine-tuning phase, which optimizes a single, non-comparative reward. What if we performed RL in a comparative way? Figure 1: This diagram illustrates the difference between reinforcement learning from absolute feedback and relative feedback. By incorporating a new component - pairwise policy gradient, we can unify the reward modeling stage and RL stage, enabling direct updates based on pairwise responses. Large Language Models ..read more
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Training Diffusion Models with
Reinforcement Learning
BAIR
by
1y ago
Training Diffusion Models with Reinforcement Learning replay Diffusion models have recently emerged as the de facto standard for generating complex, high-dimensional outputs. You may know them for their ability to produce stunning AI art and hyper-realistic synthetic images, but they have also found success in other applications such as drug design and continuous control. The key idea behind diffusion models is to iteratively transform random noise into a sample, such as an image or protein structure. This is typically motivated as a maximum likelihood estimation problem, where the ..read more
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On the Stepwise Nature of
Self-Supervised Learning
BAIR
by
1y ago
Figure 1: stepwise behavior in self-supervised learning. When training common SSL algorithms, we find that the loss descends in a stepwise fashion (top left) and the learned embeddings iteratively increase in dimensionality (bottom left). Direct visualization of embeddings (right; top three PCA directions shown) confirms that embeddings are initially collapsed to a point, which then expands to a 1D manifold, a 2D manifold, and beyond concurrently with steps in the loss. It is widely believed that deep learning’s stunning success is due in part to its ability to discover and extract useful repr ..read more
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