Why the University of Chicago’s Museum Changed Its Name
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Robert Bronder
2d ago
Kiersten Neumann, Curator of the ISAC Museum The Institute for the Study of Ancient Cultures (ISAC) Museum at the University of Chicago, known until last year as the Oriental Institute Museum, houses one of the foremost collections of West Asian and North African antiquities in North America, with more than 350,000 artifacts. Kiersten Neumann, Curator of the ISAC Museum, offers some insights on the name change, the continuing appeal and relevance of the institute and its work, and her experience as its curator. Why was the ISAC Museum originally called the Oriental Institute Museum? NEUMANN ..read more
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Rare Chalk Box Discovered in Jerusalem
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Nathan Steinmeyer
4d ago
The box discovered during the IAA excavations in the City of David. Courtesy Zohar Shemesh, Israel Museum. Chalk vessels were a common feature of Judean life during the late Second Temple period (c. 200 BCE–70 CE), but what could have been the purpose of this strange box? Excavated by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) in Jerusalem’s City of David Archaeological Park, the rare chalk box, which measures about 12 by 12 inches, was carved from limestone and and is divided into nine equal-sized compartments. Become a Member of Biblical Archaeology Society Now and Get More Than Half Off ..read more
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Excavating Jerusalem with Cosmic Rays
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Nathan Steinmeyer
1w ago
Mapping Jerusalem with Cosmic Rays: Aerial view of the City of David. Courtesy AVRAM GRAICER, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons. One of the most difficult ancient sites to excavate, Jerusalem is rife with archaeological mysteries. With excavation limited to specific and often narrow parts of the age-old city, archaeologists are often forced to think outside the box to answer their questions. Enter a team of archaeologists and physicists from Tel Aviv University (TAU) who are using cosmic rays, in the form of muons, to map the ancient city without ever even picking up a trowel. FREE ebo ..read more
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Back to School in Babylonia
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Robert Bronder
1w ago
COURTESY INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF ANCIENT CULTURES / UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Through March 24, 2024 ISAC Museum Chicago, Illinois isac.uchicago.edu This special exhibition at the Institute for the Study of Ancient Cultures (ISAC; formerly the Oriental Institute) explores what scribal training was like in ancient Babylonia. Since literacy in the ancient Near East was reserved for priests and royal scribes, most of the documents that survive from Babylonia were created by skilled professionals who worked for the king, temples, and local authorities. A highly specialized art, reading and writin ..read more
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Spring 2024 Caption Contest
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Michele Barasso
1w ago
Take part in our ever-popular Caption Contest. Write a caption for this cartoon based on Exodus 16:15–16: “When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another, ‘What is it?’ For they did not know what it was. Moses said to them, ‘It is the bread that the Lord has given you to eat. This is what the Lord has commanded: Gather as much of it as each of you needs, an omer to a person according to the number of persons, all providing for those in their own tents.’” Submit it online here. Please include your name and address. The deadline for entries is May 15, 2024. The author of the winn ..read more
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More Queries & Comments Spring 2024
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Michele Barasso
1w ago
The Millo THE ARTICLE “The Millo: Jerusalem’s Lost Monument,” by Chris McKinny et al. is excellent and makes a good case for the purpose and location of the Millo. I would like to add some points to support the article by following a possible chronology of events in the life of the Millo as the authors have cited it. In 2 Samuel 5:8, we read that David suggested the Jebusite city be taken by “going up the water shaft.” My interpretation had been that Joab and his men climbed up Warren’s Shaft or something similar.  However, I do not know whether the shaft existed at that date. In any cas ..read more
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Winter 2023 Caption Contest Winners
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Michele Barasso
1w ago
And the Winner Is … “I’m burning for some spirited conversation!” —Claudia McAdam, Highlands Ranch, Colorado Thank you to all those who submitted caption entries for our Summer 2023 cartoon, based on Acts 2:3–4: “Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.” We are pleased to congratulate Claudia McAdam of Highlands Ranch, Colorado, who wrote the winning caption.   Runners-up: “I’m telling you, if you use Babbel, the flame gets big ..read more
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Dig Scene Investigators
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Nathan Steinmeyer
1w ago
Students using a total station at Tell el-Badawiya. Courtesy Clemens Voigt, The Tell el-Badawiya Hannathon Archaeological Project. Editor’s Note: This blog article contains an image of human skeletal remains. Since the early years of archaeology, the discipline has gradually become more specialized, with archaeologists seeking to answer ever more minute and complex questions. But what are these specializations and how do they affect an excavation? To answer this question, BAR caught up with specialists to ask them what they do in the field. In the free eBook, A Digger’s Life: A Guide to ..read more
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More of Megiddo’s Roman Legionary Camp Revealed
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Nathan Steinmeyer
2w ago
Excavation of the Roman legionary camp of Legio. Courtesy Emil Aladjem. IAA. During excavations at the site of Legio, at the foot of Tel Megiddo in northern Israel, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) uncovered the main road and monumental buildings of the Roman legionary camp of the VIth Ferrata Ironclad Legion. Uncovering roads, architecture, weapons, and more, the excavation sheds further light on the largest legionary camp ever discovered in Israel. FREE ebook: Masada: The Dead Sea’s Desert Fortress. Discover what archaeology reveals about the Jewish rebels’ identity, fortificatio ..read more
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Hiker Finds 2,700-Year-Old Scarab Seal
Biblical Archaeology Society Blog
by Nathan Steinmeyer
2w ago
Bottom of the Assyrian scarab seal. Courtesy Anastasia Shapiro, IAA. While hiking in the Lower Galilee, a man was surprised to spot a small scarab seal sparkling on the ground. Used by Near Eastern cultures for millennia, seals are important indicators of the various peoples who lived in or passed through different places. In this case, the iconography of the seal, carved in the shape of a scarab beetle, identified it as Assyrian, possibly dating back to the eighth century BCE and, therefore, suggesting the presence of Assyrians in Israel at that time. In the free eBook, A Digger’s Life ..read more
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