Current Archaeology 408 – ON SALE NOW
Current Archaeology
by CA
1M ago
Our cover story features Warham Camp, a hillfort that is ‘normal for Norfolk’ (as a Norwich girl, I’m allowed to say that!) inasmuch as it is built on flat ground, but its ramparts and ditches are no less impressive than those of its loftier counterparts. What has a recent excavation revealed about its purpose? Warham Camp is an Iron Age monument with a Roman aftermath – and our next feature also explores the impact of empire in East Anglia. At Offord Cluny in Cambridgeshire, an isolated rural burial tells the story of a child who crossed continental Europe c.1,800 years ago, and of the man ..read more
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Excavating the CA Archive – Somerset Part II
Current Archaeology
by Joe Flatman
1M ago
After last month’s rural rambles around the archaeology of central and south Somerset, I will now head north and east to consider urban concerns in and around Bristol, Bath, and their environs, then journey on to Frome in the south-east of the county. BRISTOL At one point or another, virtually the entire history of Bristol has been explored in the pages of Current Archaeology, from its medieval origins to its later history as a port city with major links to the transatlantic slave industry, through to its 20th-century trials and tribulations. These complex histories have helped create the mod ..read more
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Warham Camp
Current Archaeology
by CA
1M ago
Investigating an Iron Age enigma Overlooking the impressive Iron Age earthworks of Warham Camp, towards the sea. Immediately to the left of the monument runs the River Stiffkey, which was rerouted in the 18th century, destroying a portion of its outer bank. The test-pits that can be seen in its interior were dug in July of last year. IMAGE: Cambridge Archaeological Unit Last summer, excavations at Warham Camp – a monumental Iron Age enclosure in north Norfolk – revealed intriguing clues to the site’s date and purpose. Carly Hilts visited the project and spoke to Andy Hutcheson to find out more ..read more
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Oxford Archaeology at 50
Current Archaeology
by CA
2M ago
Exploring half a century of excavations Founded in 1973, Oxford Archaeology is today one of the largest commercial units operating in the UK. Here we see one of its recent excavations, exploring a Roman villa estate at Priors Hall, Corby. IMAGE: Oxford Archaeology With one of the UK’s oldest commercial units recently celebrating its 50th birthday, Carly Hilts spoke to its founding director, Tom Hassall, and current CEO, Ken Welsh, about how the archaeological profession has changed over this period – and what the future might hold for the ways in which we engage with the past Back in CA 40, ou ..read more
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Excavating the CA Archive – Somerset Part I
Current Archaeology
by Joe Flatman
2M ago
Somerset has been a fertile hunting-ground for Current Archaeology since the magazine’s inception. There is a wealth of archaeological sites and landscapes there, from the uplands of the Mendips to the lowlands of the Levels and many points in between, including some significant urban settlements. In addition, there are strong personal connections that led the founders of Current Archaeology, Andrew and Wendy Selkirk, to visit the county regularly, including with the archaeologists Philip Rahtz (1921-2011); John Coles (1930-2020) and Bryony Coles (born 1946), John’s research partner and later ..read more
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The Klein Hollandia
Current Archaeology
by CA
3M ago
Discovering a 17th-century Dutch warship off Eastbourne Illuminating the past: a diver investigates a cannon (and its resident conger eel) belonging to the Klein Hollandia, a 17th-century Dutch warship that sank off the Sussex coast. ALL IMAGES: Martin Davies, unless otherwise stated The discovery of an anonymous shipwreck off the coast of Sussex set archaeologists on the trail of a 350-year- old mystery. Mark Beattie-Edwards reports on efforts to identify the sunken vessel and to protect its historic remains, sharing a story of bravery in battle, acts of ‘piracy’, and tragic loss of life. For ..read more
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Excavating the CA Archive – Dorset
Current Archaeology
by Joe Flatman
3M ago
Dorset is home to some stunning archaeological sites, among the most remarkable in the country. Maiden Castle near Dorchester, for example, is to many the definitive Iron Age hillfort (see CA 336, March 2018), and the Cerne Abbas giant is another perennial favourite, its more overt attractions masking the conundrum of its age and origins (see CA 365, August 2020, and CA 376, July 2021). There is no shortage of coverage of the county in Current Archaeology, and so here I will provide some of my personal favourites. To begin with, there are some superb multi-period sites: for example, Bestwall ..read more
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Current Archaeology 406 – ON SALE NOW
Current Archaeology
by CA
3M ago
This month’s cover story takes us 32m below the waves off the Sussex coast. There, a previously enigmatic wreck has been named as the Klein Hollandia, a Dutch warship that sank in 1672 following an attack that helped to spark the Third Anglo-Dutch War. We piece together the archaeological detective-work that helped to pin down the sunken vessel’s identity, and share what has been learned of its past – as well as how its remains are being protected for the future. Our next feature explores the aftermath of an earlier conflict, tracing the evolution of Venta Icenorum, a Roman town and regional ..read more
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Book of the Year 2024 – Nominees
Current Archaeology
by CA
3M ago
Below are some of the publications we feel most deserve to be recognised for their contribution to the field – the nominees for the Book of the Year award. Voting closes 5 February and all the winners of the Current Archaeology Awards will be announced on 24 February as part of Current Archaeology Live! 2024. Click here to find out more about the event. Once you’ve made your selection from the nominees below, click here to cast your vote. Picts: scourge of Rome, rulers of the North Gordon Noble and Nicholas Evans, CA 395 Drawing on the latest research, this book com ..read more
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Research Project of the Year 2024 – Nominees
Current Archaeology
by CA
3M ago
This has been another exceptional year for archaeological research. The following are some of the most exciting projects to have featured in CA over the last 12 months – the nominees for Research Project of the Year. Voting closes 5 February and all the winners of the Current Archaeology Awards will be announced on 24 February as part of Current Archaeology Live! 2024. Click here to find out more about the event. Once you’ve made your selection from the nominees below, click here to cast your vote. Sponsor of Research Project of the Year The Ness of Br ..read more
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