Copper Age Necropolis Discovered in Italy
Archaeology Magazine
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2d ago
SAN GIORGIO BIGARELLO, ITALY—A 5,000-year-old necropolis containing 22 tombs has been discovered in northern Italy, according to a Live Science report. The cemetery is situated on a dry, sandy hill, which helped to preserve the human remains, explained Simone Sestito of the Italian Ministry of Culture. Flint daggers, arrowheads, and blades have been recovered from the tombs, in addition to the bones. “Some of the tombs also had burial goods like necklaces made with soapstone beads,” Sestito said. Many of the individuals were interred with their heads to the northwest, on their left sides, with ..read more
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Neolithic Child’s Burial Excavated in India
Archaeology Magazine
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2d ago
CHENNAI, INDIA—According to a report in The New Indian Express, a burial of a child estimated to have been between the ages of nine and 11 at the time of death has been unearthed at the site of a small settlement in southeastern India by a team of researchers led by Jinu Koshy of the University of Madras. The child was buried with pottery that has been dated to the Neolithic period, between about 5000 and 1500 B.C. Radiocarbon dating will be conducted to obtain a more precise age for the burial. To read about a 2,300-year-old terracotta sarcophagus found near Chennai, go to "Double Vision ..read more
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Medieval Toy Unearthed in Poland
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2d ago
TORUŃ, POLAND—Knewz.com reports that an 800-year-old horse figurine was found during an excavation conducted as part of the construction of a new fire station in Toruń, a medieval town on the Vistula River in north-central Poland. The small clay horse was glazed and has a hole in its underside. Researchers think a stick may have fit into the hole so that playing children could pretend to make the horse gallop or use it as a puppet. The excavation also uncovered traces of a medieval tower, pottery fragments, a buckle, a knife sheath made of bone, and an amber ring. To read about pig figurines f ..read more
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Ancient Genomes from Eastern Arabia Analyzed
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3d ago
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND—According to a statement released by the University of Birmingham, an international team of researchers attempted to analyze DNA samples taken from the remains of 25 people who lived in what is now Bahrain between 300 B.C. and A.D. 600. Only four of the samples were sequenced to higher coverage due to poor preservation of the ancient remains in the region’s harsh climate. The study determined that three of these four individuals carried the G6PD Mediterranean mutation, which provides protection from malaria. Many people who lived in the region may therefore have had some na ..read more
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Piece of 17th-Century Armor Identified in Maryland
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3d ago
ST. MARY’S CITY, MARYLAND—Live Science reports that X-rays of a piece of metal unearthed at the colonial fort at Historic St. Mary’s City confirm that it once formed part of a suit of armor. The tasset, a slightly concave slab of metal, would have hung from a breastplate to protect the wearer’s thighs during battle. Travis Parno of Historic St. Mary’s City said that the X-rays made it possible to see the individual bands of steel making up the tasset, which was decorated with rivets. Parno and his colleagues suggest that the armor was likely brought to the site by the first European colonists ..read more
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Excavation in England Extends Known Border of Saxon City
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4d ago
LONDON, ENGLAND—According to a Euronews report, Lundenwic, the Saxon trading post that grew from the Roman city of Londinium, was larger than previously thought. An excavation conducted at the National Gallery in London uncovered evidence of a hearth dated to the seventh or eighth century, postholes, stake holes, pits, and ditches at what would have been the western end of the Saxon settlement. Researchers led by archaeologist Stephen White of Archaeology South-East also found surviving segments of city walls constructed in the seventeenth or eighteenth centuries at the site. To read about tol ..read more
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13th-Century Inscription Discovered in Southern India
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4d ago
TAMIL NADU, INDIA—According to a report in The New Indian Express, an inscription dated to the thirteenth century has been uncovered near the southern tip of India by researchers from Manonmaniam Sundaranar University. The text reveals that Kulasekarapandian, a king of the Pandya Dynasty who ruled between A.D. 1190 and 1216, built a temple on the banks of the Thamirabarani River. The researchers suggest that the structure may have been demolished by later Chola rulers, or damaged during floods, and its stones reused to build the dam where the inscription was discovered. To read about a structu ..read more
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Medieval Abbey Cemetery Excavated in Northern Ireland
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4d ago
CARRICKFERGUS, COUNTY ANTRIM—BBC News reports that the remains of more than 140 people were found in an area where a medieval abbey is thought to have been located during an investigation conducted ahead of a construction project. Woodburn Abbey was built in 1326 by the Premonstratensians, a Roman Catholic religious order, and dissolved in 1542 when the community moved away. The abbey building was then partially demolished in 1558 and eventually lost. The abbey cemetery is thought to have been situated alongside the main structure, explained Chris Long of Gahan and Long Archaeological Services ..read more
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Possible Bronze Age Cosmetic From Iran Analyzed
Archaeology Magazine
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5d ago
PADUA, ITALY—A small stone vial holding a bright red pigment may be an early example of lipstick, according to a Live Science report. The vial was discovered in southeastern Iran after several Bronze Age cemeteries near the city of Jiroft were flooded by the Halil River in 2001. Massimo Vidale of the University of Padua and his colleagues analyzed the artifact, which has been held at the Jiroft Archaeological Museum. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the dark, powdery substance in the vial is about 4,000 years old, Vidale said. “The container, made of a fine chloritic green rock, replicates th ..read more
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Traces of Bronze Age Copper Mine Found in Oman
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6d ago
WARSAW, POLAND—Science in Poland reports that evidence for the processing of copper ore has been found in the rocky, mountainous Qumayrah region of Oman. Piotr Bieliński and Agnieszka Pieńkowska of the University of Warsaw were looking for traces of copper mining, processing, and smelting because it is known that the metal was exported from the region to India and Mesopotamia throughout the Early Bronze Age, between about 2600 and 2000 B.C. “On [the] ground surface, we found dozens of stone tools used for crushing ore and numerous fragments of furnace walls used for smelting copper,” Pieńkowsk ..read more
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