An Unexpected Pairing of Francesca Woodman and Julia Margaret Cameron
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1w ago
This spring, the National Portrait Gallery in London has staged an unexpected pairing of Francesca Woodman and Julia Margaret Cameron, whose bodies of photographic work were made a hundred years apart. The lushly titled Portraits to Dream In, the result of a thoughtful and imaginative curatorial inquiry, provides a compelling guide to their posthumous resemblances and describes a cultural arc of Romanticism from the mid-nineteenth-century to the turn of the twentieth, from luminous and pastoral to haunted and opaque. Both artists were engaged with the past, and the exhibition places them in a ..read more
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Avion Pearce Creates a World between Reality and Dreams
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1w ago
In her poem “A Litany for Survival,” Audre Lorde speaks of the precarious experience of living with the knowledge that one’s survival is not only without guarantee but actively, purposefully threatened. Avion Pearce borrowed a line from Lorde for the title of their series In the Hours Between Dawn (2022–24), an ode to the possibilities of the midnight hours. The experience of the queer and trans community of color in Brooklyn that Pearce photographs is a testament to Lorde’s words. Survival—half shrouded, yet insistent—can appear in forms both soft and strong. Pearce, who works with 8-by-10 an ..read more
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A Playful Investigation of Community and Territory
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1w ago
Since the sixteenth-century, mining has been a dominant part of the Bolivian landscape and economy. During the colonial era, silver mining played a vital role in establishing the dominance of the Spanish Empire, and to this day, the region has continued to see extraction for minerals such as tin, zinc, and lithium. In his series MITA (2022–ongoing), the photographer River Claure asks: What are the repercussions of five hundred years of colonial extraction on a person’s sense of identity, history, and territory? Photographing throughout Llallagua, Uncia, and Catavia—all former mining commu ..read more
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In India, an Artist Revives the Legacy of a Small-Town Photo Studio
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1w ago
Abhishek Khedekar grew up by the sea. For most of his childhood, his hometown of Dapoli—which clings to India’s western coastline, about 125 miles south of Mumbai—felt like a precious secret. Flanked on either side by mountains and the Arabian Sea, the town was once a British army camp; today, it’s a beloved regional tourist destination, replete with coconut trees that tower over the graves of colonial officers. Dapoli offered a limitless canvas to a young Khedekar, who spent countless afternoons exploring its verdant expanse with his friends. He didn’t know it back then, but the ima ..read more
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Laila Stevens Seeks Sisterhood in Her Portraits of Black Women
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1w ago
When Laila Stevens first drove from New York to North Carolina to visit her extended family on a summer trip in 2021, she was immediately struck by the historical weight of the Southern landscape. “It was my first experience with seeing swampland, plantations, trees that were reminiscent of things that I’ve seen in history books,” Stevens says. “It was very shocking and moving to me—it felt like it needed to be documented.” Shortly after arriving, she took a walk through the swamplands with her sister. Having just watched Gordon Parks’s film The Learning Tree (1969), she instantly recalled the ..read more
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A Young Photographer Makes a Family Tree about South Africa
Aperture
by Aperturewp
3w ago
A vast and variegated holiday destination, a bottomless repository of cheap Black labor, and a site of bitterly fought wars of resistance against colonial dispossession—South Africa’s Eastern Cape is as beautiful as it is unknowable. The province occupies the moodiest quarter of the country’s coastline and stretches into the semiarid escarpment and the southern edge of the Drakensberg mountain range. Its landscape is at parts lush, rugged, pristine, and broken.  In the Johannesburg-based photographer Lindokuhle Sobekwa’s newest series Ezilalini (The Country) (2020–ongoing), the ..read more
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Kosen Ohtsubo’s Flower Planet
Aperture
by Aperturewp
3w ago
For nearly fifty years, Kosen Ohtsubo has run roughshod over the idea of ikebana as a stately practice of arranging flowers in a vase. He is known for using vegetables, when he sticks to plants at all, and he often sets his compositions in unconventional containers. His 1984 work I Am Taking a Bath Like This was arranged in his own bathroom. On one wall, a cobalt vase in a small alcove holds some flowering irises. But this is only an accent within the wild gaiety of the entire piece, in which iris leaves have been plastered across the tiled room and gather neatly in the tub below, next to an a ..read more
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Aperture Breaks Ground for New Home on Upper West Side of New York City
Aperture
by Lauren Van Natten
3w ago
On April 30, 2024, Aperture hosted a ceremonial ground-breaking at 380 Columbus Avenue to mark the commencement of construction of its new permanent home on New York’s Upper West Side, set within two floors of a historical building. Opening in early 2025, the highly visible and welcoming space signals a renewed, long-term vision for Aperture’s future—one that recognizes Aperture’s critical role in bringing together the array of artists, writers, institutions, and enthusiasts that are transformed by photography every day. While honoring Aperture’s legacy and enduring role in the field, the cel ..read more
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A Biennial in Houston Explores the Politics of Visibility
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1M ago
In the waning decades of Soviet rule in Czechoslovakia, Prague’s T-Club was an open secret. The clandestine gay nightclub had claimed its own gravitational force, tucked into a basement behind Wenceslas Square, where much of the drama of the 1968 Prague Spring and the subsequent “normalization” period were playing out. It was an anxious time, and the country was quickly sliding back into autocratic rule; there were widespread crackdowns on pro-democracy reformists and state eyes were everywhere. For patrons who were marginalized by the sitting regime for their sexuality and politics, T-Cl ..read more
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8 Photobooks that Consider How Artists Engage with the Environment
Aperture
by Aperturewp
1M ago
Robert Adams, New Housing, Reche Canyon, San Bernardino County, California, 1983 American Silence: The Photographs of Robert Adams (2021) For fifty years, Robert Adams has made compelling, provocative, and highly influential photographs that show us the wonder and fragility of the American landscape, its inherent beauty, and the inadequacy of our response to it. Photographing what Adams calls “the silence of light” of the American West, his images capture the sense of peace and harmony that nature can instill in us while questioning the desecration of that beauty by consumerism, industrializat ..read more
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