Doing Educational Equity Wrong
Education Next Blog
by Michael J. Petrilli
1d ago
This is the final article in a series on doing educational equity right. See the introductory post, as well as ones on school finance, student discipline, advanced education,  school closures, homework, grading and effective teaching. For the past several months, I’ve been pumping out posts about “doing educational equity right.” Given that Eight is Enough, it’s time to wrap things up. Let’s conclude with a twist and look at three ways that schools are doing educational equity wrong: By engaging in the soft bigotry of low expectations. By tying teachers’ hands without good reason ..read more
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Fishing for Rules
Education Next Blog
by Joshua Dunn
2d ago
The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the Department of Education has long been known for its tendency to overstep in its rulemaking. Many federal agencies are tempted to avoid the notice-and-comment requirements of the Administrative Procedures Act (APA) by fabricating administrative law in the form of “clarifications” and “guidance”—but no agency has succumbed to that temptation more than OCR. As Shep Melnick has pointed out (see “Rethinking Federal Regulation of Sexual Harassment,” features, Winter 2018), OCR has used “Dear Colleague” letters (DCLs) to rewrite Title IX and wade into hot-but ..read more
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A Need for More Speed in Education Data
Education Next Blog
by Education Next
2d ago
On Monday, I talked with departing Institute of Education Sciences Director Mark Schneider, who just wrapped up his six-year term. In our conversation, he argued for newer and better research centers at IES, along with a heightened commitment to producing timely and accessible reports. Well, as anyone who knows Mark well can attest, he almost always has more to say. I thought I’d reach back out and see if he had anything else he wanted to get off his mind. Here is Part Two of our conversation. —Rick Hess Rick Hess: On Monday, you mentioned that Marguerite Roza, Emily Oster, and Sean Reardon ..read more
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Generative AI in Education: Another Mindless Mistake?
Education Next Blog
by Benjamin Riley
4d ago
Picture the scene: A new technology has been introduced that is unlike anything we’ve seen before. This technology creates a new means of sharing information that is both interesting and entertaining and promises to generate new forms of knowledge on a regular basis. Indeed, this new creation appears so transformative, it leads one of the world’s most prominent entrepreneurs to predict that the method of transmitting knowledge to students will be radically altered in just a few years. I’m referring, of course, to 1913 and the introduction of motion-picture technology—movies—which led Thoma ..read more
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The Education Exchange: Is Mayoral Control of School Boards Good for New York City?
Education Next Blog
by Education Next
4d ago
Vladimir Kogan, a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Ohio State University, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss a new report from the New York State Education Department which argues that control of schools should move from mayors to school boards. The report, “Mayoral Control of New York City Public Schools,” is available here. Follow The Education Exchange on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or here on Education Next. — Education Next The post The Education Exchange: Is Mayoral Control of School Boards Good for New York City? appeared first on Education Next ..read more
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The 5 Percent Problem
Education Next Blog
by Laurence Holt
1w ago
In 1924, Sidney Pressey, a professor from Ohio State University, invented a teaching machine. The mechanical device, about the size of a portable typewriter, allowed students to press one of four keys to answer questions curated by expert instructors. A later version dispensed candy for correct answers. Education optimists were fascinated, and Pressey promised the technology would accelerate student learning. But the machine was a commercial flop. Exactly a century later, similar programs spangle U.S. classrooms: i-Ready, DreamBox, Khan Academy, IXL, and many others. They are driven by cle ..read more
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The Math Movement Taking Over Our Schools
Education Next Blog
by Ryan Hooper
1w ago
What if I told you that lifeguards have a new method for teaching toddlers how to swim by throwing them in the deep end of a swimming pool without supervision, in hopes that they will learn from their productive struggle? Or that grandma’s cookbook would be thrown out because of its limiting step-by-step approach to baking a pie? Or that 16-year-olds should discover how to drive from their peers or, better still, on their own? For most people, teaching young people skills in this way would seem foolish, counterproductive, even disastrous. However, educators nationwide are adopting similar ..read more
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A School Sector in Search of a Name
Education Next Blog
by Eric Wearne
1w ago
What should we call the growing number of learning environments that lie between traditional homeschooling and conventional, five-days-a-week, brick-and-mortar public and private schooling? So-called “microschools” and “hybrid schools” have gained enormous popularity in the past few years. The first Prenda microschool opened in Arizona in 2018, and Prenda has since served nearly 10,000 students. The King’s Academy, a hybrid school in Georgia, started with just over 100 students and currently serves more than 1,000. Yet these increasingly common terms do not capture the breadth of this burg ..read more
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The Divergent Roads to Post-Secondary Success
Education Next Blog
by Ryan Craig
1w ago
High school seniors have traditionally faced a binary choice upon graduation: go to college or get a job. But today, with skyrocketing college tuition and debt, and with most entry-level jobs paying less than a living wage, another alternative is on the rise: apprenticeships. These training opportunities offer the apprentice remunerative work while also satisfying employers’ desire for skilled employees. Should policymakers seek to expand apprenticeships—and free up public funds to support them? Or should we be leery of steering students into career preparation without the salutary benefit ..read more
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Could Our Assumptions about Who Receives Advanced Education be Wrong?
Education Next Blog
by Jonathan Plucker
1w ago
Advanced education has always been controversial. Whether discussing gifted programs, acceleration, ability grouping, or honors courses, school leaders and equity-minded advocates have questioned the need for and effectiveness of such services. The debate has become especially acrimonious, primarily due to underrepresentation of Black, Hispanic, and low-income groups in these programs. In response, many public schools have reduced or eliminated advanced services, arguing that the programs are both discriminatory and ineffective (see San Francisco, Cleveland, Culver City, among many other e ..read more
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