An ABC Journey through books.
GSQ Blog
by Guest Blogger
5d ago
By Jill Ball. AA Great Britain and Ireland 2019 edition. After reading Shauna’s recent post I decided to write another genealogy ABC, focusing on books. Throughout my genealogy journey hundreds of books have supported me, many are listed on my Librarything and/or Goodreads pages. Please join me as I remember some. A is for …(Road) AtlasesWhen we hit the research road, we follow a paper map in addition to GPS devices. Road Atlases are easier to handle than a large map and provide a lot of detail. We have purchased several, for the UK, Europe and the US, which fit nicely into a suitc ..read more
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Who in the family will take my family history notes?
GSQ Blog
by Christine Leonard
1w ago
Author’s Wall family A4 folders and display books. Another year turns over and a question nibbles away in the back of my mind, like mice hidden in the interior walls of a house, sneaking the odd bit of cheese when you least expect it. On the floor in my studio tucked away in the garden sit three plastic crates, a transparent shade of white as plastic crates commonly are, revealing the edges of old newspaper cuttings, letters, photo albums, and photocopies of records passed down by distant cousins and my late aunt. Beside the crates too heavy for stacking higher up, is a wooden unit of two sh ..read more
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Shauna’s family history A – Z.
GSQ Blog
by Shauna Hicks
2w ago
Outside the FamilySearch library in Salt Lake City. Author’s own collection. It is always a challenge when asked to do a guest blog for GSQ. What do readers want? January is a time of looking forward to what we might do during the year. Here are a few of my thoughts for genealogy in 2024. Apologies in advance, I am a bit wordy. A is for ArchivesMy visits to the Runcorn State Archives are few and far between mainly because of distance, traffic and driving on freeways. It is about a 4 or more-hour return trip. But with my PhD research I do need to make more frequent trips. To make the most of ..read more
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Accentuating the positives 2023
GSQ Blog
by Pauline Williams
3w ago
2023 was a difficult year for me and it was not easy to find positives in a sea of losses. I wasn’t able to answer many of the topics that Jill Ball listed in her annual quest to accentuate the positive. This post therefore represents a personal review of my genealogy-related experiences in 2023 that I feel able to share. I spent some time in 2023 revisiting research on my paternal ancestry. I wrote an article on the family of my 2x great aunt that was published in the Derbyshire Family History Society magazine early in 2023. At the beginning of that article I mentioned the connection to my gr ..read more
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Remembering to Accentuate the Positive 2023 – Jill Ball’s yearly challenge.
GSQ Blog
by Bobbie Edes
1M ago
Jill Ball has set a January challenge on GeniAus for a yearly blog to Accentuate the Positive, 2024 is my fifth yearly effort looking back over 2023 this time.  The challenge has 20 set points to cover, and some I’ve varied just a smidge. Challenge 1. Revisiting old research: timeline created to sort out who is whom On revisiting some old research I found that doing an involved timeline of all instances of events within the surname within the subject’s locality helped ‘zone in’ on possible folk to consider and research deeper. In 2023 I hooked up with another new (to me) GSQ membe ..read more
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The Wheeler Project.
GSQ Blog
by Guest Blogger
2M ago
By Geraldine Lee. Originally published as GSQ Blog on 23 Oct 2016 Mrs Annie Wheeler, c.1920. Image courtesy of Capricornia Coast Historical Society. One hundred years ago the world was engulfed in conflict. Men and women from every nation were conscripted or volunteered to fight when hostilities broke out in Europe in August 1914. Some 416,809 Australian men and women enlisted in the First Australian Imperial Force (AIF), the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army.  By the end of the war, over 60,000 Australians had been killed and 156,000 wounded, gassed or taken prisoner. One ..read more
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My grandmother Eileen Evans and the photo in a locket.
GSQ Blog
by Guest Blogger
2M ago
By Catherine Thompson. I knew nothing about Eileen Evans my paternal grandmother, or her early life until I started doing family history in the 1990’s, many years after her death in 1969. Stored in the bottom of a wardrobe was a shoe box of photos, inherited by my father from a maternal aunt and his mother’s cousin, Evelyn Walls. There were a lot of photos of people I didn’t know, and my first reaction was to want to throw them away. I admit to committing this genealogical sin for some photos until I realized that I had the beginnings of my family history in this box. The Maypole dance and ch ..read more
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Threads of memories
GSQ Blog
by Christine Leonard
3M ago
Portrait of John (Jack) H. Wall. Image courtesy of Helen Killiner, his granddaughter. ‘Weaving threads of memories’ a phrase from the subtitle of my book on the Wall family, remains ever constant through my ongoing interest in family history. Those words manifested recently, demonstrating to me how memories and past events linger in archival records and family correspondence only to emerge in surprising ways as golden threads in the tapestry of our research or quest. The Internet can be the cause of a lot of problems, but it is also a source of good. Recently I connected with two people of n ..read more
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Arriving under protection.
GSQ Blog
by Janice Cooper
3M ago
Four single women arrived in New South Wales on the barque, Theresa on 25 August 1842 as bounty immigrants. They had travelled under the protection of my 2x great-grandfather, Christopher Cooper, his wife Magdaline and their children. Two of the four were related to Christopher and Magdaline. My family group came from the northern Irish counties of Fermanagh and Tyrone, two counties which were strongly represented among the passengers on board Theresa with her Irish, English and Scottish immigrants. The conditions under which these single women immigrated to New South Wales were outlined in Re ..read more
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Strong women.
GSQ Blog
by Beverley Murray
3M ago
A few months ago, I accompanied my family to watch the exciting soccer match between the Matildas and France and subsequently followed the final games of the Women’s World Cup. I discovered and read an article about the Danish player Nadia Nadim. What an extraordinary young woman!  However, it’s not my purpose here to explain her story, you can seek it out if you enjoy reading about strong women.  I will tell you that Nadia certainly grabbed at chances that came her way. Bonks Hill Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire. Photo collection of author. After reading Nadia’s story, I started to ..read more
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