Canterbury Tales Intervention
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
1M ago
by Jack Heerema  I suffer from a heroic mindset, aggravated by the romance of historical fiction. There is no twelve-step program. There is no cure. My thought processes have become irrelevant. Is the miller telling his tale in Procol Harum’s Whiter Shade of Pale the same miller who is telling his tale in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales? How can this be! I have clung to the desperate hope that the person who borrowed the Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History will return it. I have never admitted to anyone ever that I have a hard bound copy of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and only I know where ..read more
Visit website
The Oaks Mine Christmas Disaster
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
7M ago
by David A. Jacinto December 12th, 1866,  began not unlike most winter days in the village of Hoyle Mill. Two weeks before Christmas, a foggy mist drifted through the valley and gripped the bitterly cold and wet morning. Enthusiasm for Christmas  was running high.  Most men and boys in the village had been putting in overtime at the Oaks Coal Mine south of Barnsley to make a little extra Christmas money.  That morning, well before dawn,  the coal miners shared a final word over tea and crumpets, bangers and mash, or blood sausage, kissed their wives and mothers goodby ..read more
Visit website
The British Women who Flew in World War Two
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
10M ago
 The Second World War was the first in which women played a role in aviation. Russian women flew combat missions as bomber and fighter pilots, but in Great Britain and the United States the role of women pilots was supportive rather than direct. Below is a short description of the important role of British women pilots in WWII.   In the U.K. women flew with the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA), which was founded almost immediately after the start of WWII by senior executives of British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) to employ pilots not fit for military service in supporting roles ..read more
Visit website
Angevin History
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
10M ago
   The 19th century historian’s work was not complete unless infused with a touch of misogyny. This is particularly prevalent during the period of the Angevin kings. This was not done in a grand scheme as Lord Macaulay’s desire to have everyone in India speak English. Historians have characterized Queen Eleanor as being headstrong, contrary and willful, of course, these terms could never be applied to King Henry II, who standardized laws uniformly across England. There is always a reason behind the reason. He needed money and quickly to finance his continental wars.    The ..read more
Visit website
British Women at War: The Women's Royal Navy Service
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
11M ago
 The smallest and most elite of the women's services in the U.K. was undoubtedly the Women's Royal Naval Service or WRNS. Because its numbers never exceeded 75,000, the WRNS was never dependent upon conscription; volunteers were sufficient to fill its needs. It also cultivated and maintained a reputation as being exclusive and having higher standards. Like the other women's services, the Women's Royal Naval Service had its roots in the First World War when it was created in late 1917 to help meet manpower shortages. The women were used to free up male ratings from shore-based duties prim ..read more
Visit website
British Women at War: The Role of the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) in WWII
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
1y ago
  From the start of the war, British women were encouraged to volunteer for one of the three women's auxiliary military services: Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS), the Women's Royal Naval Service (WRNS) and Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF). The oldest, largest and least glamorous, of the three was the ATS.   The ATS was officially authorized by Royal Warrant in September 1938 and was intended to bring together under a single structure a variety of voluntary organizations which sought to recruit women volunteers to support the military in time of war. Some of these groups had ro ..read more
Visit website
Liverpool's Role in the US Civil War
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
1y ago
Liverpool in the 1860s   Unlike the rest of Britain, Liverpool’s population and economic status plummeted after World War Two. Go back 80 years further, though, and you have Britain’s second great metropolis, thriving off King Cotton and still benefitting hand-over-fist from the transatlantic slave trade. In modern terms, it would be a city of four million people, or nearly twice the size of Paris. A confident, arrogant world player grasping at city statehood. Liverpool sucked money into its Cotton Exchange and banks directly from the trade winds and favourable currents from the new world ..read more
Visit website
Woman at War - British Factory Girls in WWII
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
1y ago
As in the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany and, indeed, the United States, by far the largest number of women mobilized in support of the war effort went into the civilian labor force to replace men called to arms. Yet whereas women in U.S. factories were all volunteers and the Germans relied heavily on slave labor from the Concentration Camps, POWs and occupied Europe, Britain conscripted women into the munitions and aircraft factories from 1942 onwards. Already by 1941, it was obvious to the British government that there was a serious shortage of manpower both to fight the war and to produce the ..read more
Visit website
British Women at War -- The "Land Girls"
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
1y ago
 by Helena P. Schrader Throughout history, when men went to war, the burden of maintaining agricultural production — often the mainstay of the economy — fell to the family members left behind. That meant old people and children – and women. Yet in WWII, something new happened. Rather than relying on whatever family members happened to remain behind, the British government organized an external labor force to help farmers cope; it called on women to help out on the land and created the “Women’s Land Army.” The Women's Land Army (WLA) had its origins in WWI. Established in 1917, the Women ..read more
Visit website
Four interesting facts about Henry VIII
English Historical Fiction Authors
by
1y ago
Part of a blog series about 'I am Henry,' the new novel and award-winning short film of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, by Jan Hendrik Verstaten & Massimo Barbato During the period we were writing ‘I am Henry,’ we stumbled upon some interesting facts. Some of them made it into the book as part of a conversation or a scene, while others were just interesting to us. Here, we want to share some of those facts. 1. Henry VIII was a loyal friend to his horses It did not surprise us that as a king, Henry VIII would have an interest in horses, but what we did not know was that despite his reputatio ..read more
Visit website

Follow English Historical Fiction Authors on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR