Supreme Court unanimously concludes that anti-abortion groups have no standing to challenge access to mifepristone – but the drug likely faces more court challenges
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
3w ago
Activists on both sides of the abortion battle are gearing up for it to be a major issue in the 2024 election. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images Naomi Cahn, University of Virginia and Sonia Suter, George Washington University On June 13, 2024, the Supreme Court of the United States unanimously decided to uphold access to mifepristone, one of two pills used in medication abortion. Mifepristone has long been used safely and effectively in medication abortions around the world. Shortly after the 2022 Dobbs decision that overturned 50 years of abortion rights, anti-abortion groups and do ..read more
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American womanhood is not what it used to be − understanding the backlash to Dobbs v. Jackson
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
3w ago
Abortion rights activists rally outside the Supreme Court in April 2024. Associated Press Linda J. Nicholson, Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis As someone who over the past 50 years has thought about and written many books and articles on U.S. feminism, I should have been less surprised by the strong electoral backlash to the Supreme Court’s 2022 Dobbs V. Jackson Women’s Health Organization ruling, a judgment that overturned the 1973 Roe V. Wade decree and thus 50 years of national abortion rights. True, I expected massive street demonstrations and marches after Dobbs ..read more
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Quick adoption in 34 states of Erin’s Law to prevent child abuse shows power of one individual to make policy
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
1M ago
Advertisement Erin Merryn, center, flanked by Senators David J. Valesky, left, and Jeffrey D. Klein, at the New York state senate discussing Erin’s Law in October 2011. New York State Senate Sanghee Park, Indiana University and Joel Vallett, Southern Utah University Policymaking, a process by which governments make decisions about how to address social issues, is shaped by various factors, such as the political climate, socioeconomic conditions and cultural and historical backgrounds. Some factors are obvious, others not. Often, policy is made by groups of people working together – advocate ..read more
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Louisiana reclassifies abortion pills as controlled, dangerous substances − here’s what that means
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
1M ago
Advertisement Misoprostol has a long history of safe and effective use. AP Photo/Allen G. Breed Jamie Rowen, UMass Amherst and Tami S. Rowen, University of California, San Francisco Louisiana’s governor signed a bill on May 24, 2024, that reclassifies two abortion pills, mifepristone and misoprostol, as “controlled, dangerous substances.” Both pills have a long history of safe and effective use in medication abortions as well as for treatment of miscarriages and other conditions. The law makes it illegal to possess either of the pills without a prescription. Surgical and medication abortion ..read more
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Femicide: many countries around the world are making the killing of women a specific crime – here’s why it’s needed
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
2M ago
Advertisement Madhumita Pandey, Sheffield Hallam University In 1782, a judge in England gave husbands the right to use violence on their wives as long as any implement used was not thicker than their thumb. This standard of measurement led to the coining of the term “rule of thumb”. Society has thankfully made enough progress to find such archaic ideas abhorrent. However, tens of thousands of women continue to be killed every year around the world just for being women. UN data shows that, on average, five women or girls are killed every hour by someone in their own family. Some countries a ..read more
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Arizona’s 1864 abortion law was made in a women’s rights desert – here’s what life was like then
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
2M ago
Advertisement A group of men and women, including two soldiers, on a porch in Fort Verde, Ariz., in 1886. Buyenlarge/Getty Images Calvin Schermerhorn, Arizona State University Dora Juhl, a 15-year-old teenager, walked into Dr. Rosa Goodrich Boido’s obstetrical practice in Phoenix in January 1918. Juhl wanted to end her pregnancy. But abortion was illegal in Arizona. Boido, the city’s sole female physician, asked Juhl for US$100 – about $2,000 today – to perform the abortion. Juhl said she could pay $27 – her entire savings – but Boido explained the legal risks, including the prison time she ..read more
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In the age of cancel culture, shaming can be healthy for online communities – a political scientist explains when and how
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
2M ago
Advertisement Public shaming can help uphold online community norms. bo feng/iStock via Getty Images Jennifer Forestal, Loyola University Chicago “Cancel culture” has a bad reputation. There is growing anxiety over this practice of publicly shaming people online for violating social norms ranging from inappropriate jokes to controversial business practices. Online shaming can be a wildly disproportionate response that violates the privacy of the shamed while offering them no good way to defend themselves. These consequences lead some critics to claim that online shaming creates a “hate stor ..read more
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Other states, like Arizona, could resurrect laws on abortion, LGBTQ+ issues and more that have been lying dormant for more than 100 years
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
3M ago
Advertisement Pro-abortion rights demonstrators rally in Scottsdale, Ariz., on April 15, 2024. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images Dara E. Purvis, Penn State When the Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to get an abortion in June 2022, Justice Clarence Thomas suggested that the court “should reconsider” other rights it currently recognizes – like the rights for same-sex couples to have sex and marry. If the Supreme Court overturns legal precedents on these and other issues, old state laws that haven’t been enforced, possibly for centuries, can suddenly spring back to life ..read more
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Traditional Japanese diet associated with less brain shrinkage in women compared to western diet, says research
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
3M ago
Advertisement Many traditional Japanese foods are high in vitamins and minerals which may help to keep the brain healthy. Nishihama/ Shutterstock Giovanni Sala, University of Liverpool and Shu Zhang, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology Cognitive decline and dementia already affect more than 55 million people worldwide. This number is projected to skyrocket over the next few decades as the global population ages. There are certain risk factors of cognitive decline and dementia that we cannot change – such as having a genetic predisposition to these conditions. But other risk facto ..read more
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Why are Americans fighting over no-fault divorce? Maybe they can’t agree what marriage is for
Femalista | Women's Rights News
by WRN Editor
4M ago
Advertisement Marcia Zug, University of South Carolina “First comes love, then comes marriage” – so goes the classic children’s rhyme. But not everyone agrees. Increasingly, the idea that love is the most important reason to marry – or at least to stay married – is under attack. Republican pundits and lawmakers have been pushing back on the availability of no-fault divorce, challenging the idea that not being in love is a valid reason to end a marriage. Speaking as a professor of family law, I know such views aren’t new. Zsa Zsa Gabor once quipped, “Getting divorced just because you don’t l ..read more
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