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Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2w ago
Ahoy there! Happy birthday to Rob. My first homemade card that includes a porthole ..read more
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Were-Wolf Walking
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
My first experiments for part of a longer animation celebrating Baring-Gould’s Centenary, using Procreate and the new animation program, Procreate Dreams ..read more
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Flame, Flood and Were-Wolves
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
Baring-Gould in Horbury In 2024, the Baring-Gould Centenary year, we’re celebrating – in artwork and animation – his work inspired by the time he spent as a young curate in Horbury: the hymn ‘Onward Christian Soldiers’, his folklore study ’The Book of Were-Wolves’ and his semi-autobiographical novel, set in a thinly disguised version of Horbury, ’Through Flood and Flame’. Cue thwarted love, dramatic disasters and the villainous Richard Grover, man-monkey and firebrand preacher. Special thanks to local historian Keith Lister, author of ‘Half My Life’, the Story of Sabine Baring-Gould and ..read more
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Trouble at t’Mill
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
As the title is Through Fire and Flood, I don’t think that peril number 2 will be a plot-spoiler for anyone who hasn’t read Sabine Baring-Gould’s melodramatic novel ..read more
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Hugh Arkwright, ‘Through Flood . . .’
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
Meet our hero, Hugh Arkwright of Arkwright’s Mill in Sabine Baring-Gould’s thinly disguised version of Horbury in his semi-autobiographical novel of 1868, Through Flood and Flame. I’ve gone for him encountering peril number one, the flood. I based the action-hero pose on an Indiana Jones movie poster but as Indy is holding his trademark bullwhip and our hero Hugh was negotiating the flood walking along a garden wall clinging onto a clothes line to keep his balance, I’ve shown him in a later scene which involves a rescue by boat (although in that case Hugh is catching the lifeline rather ..read more
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Annis Greenwell, Mill Worker
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
Despite the melodrama and the larger-than-life characters, Baring-Gould’s novel Through Flood and Flame was semi-autobiographical. Annis Greenwell was closely modelled on Grace Taylor, a young worker at Baines’s Mill, who – in real life – he met, fell in love with and, a few years later, in May 1868, married at St Peter’s, Horbury ..read more
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Richard Grover, Man-Monkey
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
The first character for my Baring-Gould Centenary display is taken from his Horbury-inspired novel Through Flood and Flame: Richard Grover, man-monkey (and firebrand preacher ..read more
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Wonka and Were-Wolves
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
2M ago
Willy Wonka raising his hat on the cover of last week’s Radio Times struck me as the perfect gesture to show Sabine Baring-Gould introducing himself when he arrived in Horbury in 1865 as the new curate. My first rough (on the right) for the main display in my Baring-Gould centenary exhibit results in awkward shapes to fit the characters into, so I’ve decided to go for simple rectangles (left). The characters will be cardboard cut-outs to give the effect of a Victorian toy theatre ..read more
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Werewolf Storyboard
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
4M ago
My next practice exercise in illustrator Martín Tognola’s Animated Illustration in Procreate: Tell a Story with Movement Domestika course is to use word lists, mind maps and a ‘visual data dump’ to come up with an idea for a short looping animation. As I’ve been thinking about my Baring Gould centenary show in Horbury’s Redbox Gallery for a while now, I’ve skipped the word list stage and gone straight on to a visual mind map. I’m a visual rather than word-based thinker. I realise that I’m not short of potential material. With mid-Victorian factory smoke and steam in the air plus the ‘Fla ..read more
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Autumnal Animations
Wild Yorkshire
by Richard
4M ago
My latest Domestika course is illustrator Martín Tognola’s Animated Illustration in Procreate: Tell a Story with Movement. Our first practice exercise is to ‘start testing and see how the animation tool works, discovering what each thing is for,’ so I’ve gone for some simple seasonal subjects. ‘I invite you to do your own experiments,’ he suggests, ‘Start by drawing simple objects and see how magical it is to animate them. This is the ideal place to make mistakes, learn and clear up doubts.’ He starts us off by explaining how to animate this looping bird, this is my version, closely f ..read more
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