Q&A Ambre Hobson, Trek Travel
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
If you saw issue 66 of Cyclist, you’d have seen our phenomenal Big Ride in Montana, USA under the expert guidance of Trek Travel. But Montana is far from theonly destination on Trek Travel’s extensive list of cycling holidays. We chat to Ambre Hobson, Trek Travel outside sales manager, to learn more about what they have to offer riders seeking adventure Interview JACK LYNCH   Cyclist: Hi Ambre. Firstly, congrats on working in what appears to be one of the world’s best jobs. It’s all bikes and beautiful places, right? Ambre Hobson: Hey, shhh, let’s keep this between us, but you’re absolut ..read more
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Q&A Kate Kellett
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
The elite World Solo 24-hour MTB Champ and seven-time Peaks Challenge 11-hour wave leader discusses her love of multiple disciplines, advice for Peaks first-timers and getting closer to gender parity in the cycling community Interview JACK LYNCH Photography OUTER IMAGE COLLECTIVE / RACE ATLAS   Cyclist: Hey Kate. For those unaware of your cycling CV, can you please run our readers through your palmarés and background? Kate Kellett: I grew up on acreage and like most kids in the country, learned to ride quite early on. As an adult I didn’t get into competitive cycling until I was in my ea ..read more
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Met Trenta 3K Carbon Mips helmet
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Met’s Trenta 3K Carbon Mips has a unique construction, which makes it extra strong and hard-wearing. As the name suggests, it embeds a 3K Carbon technology into the shell to improve longevity and, of course, provide greater protection should the rider fall. Further protection is found in the Mips Air system. Mips needs little introduction; ubiquitous in cycling helmets for the better part of a decade, it helps the helmet roll across the rider’s head in a crash, rather than the head roll across tarmac. The Mips Air is more refined than the standard version, allowing for extra comfort and venti ..read more
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Lazer Z1KinetiCore helmet
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
The popular Lazer Z1 has had a facelift that has made it lighter, more comfortable and more aero than previous iterations. Lazer sells the Z1 KinetiCore by outlining its superior fit and feel when compared to its competitors. Every helmet these days is light enough (the Z1 is 220g in M), aero enough and safe enough, but after hours in the saddle a comfortable helmet truly does make a difference – as does an uncomfortable one. The iconic RollSys thumb wheel adjustment is now ponytail-friendly and allows for vertical and horizontal adjustment to achieve a tailored fit. Fashionistas will appreci ..read more
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Northwave Veloce Extreme shoes
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Worn by Ineos Grenadiers’ Filippo Ganna throughout 2023 The Veloce Extreme is the latest shoe to top Northwave’s road line-up. The Italian company says the new shoes build on technology from the Extreme Pro 3 and – unsurprisingly given the price – target the performance end of the market. The Veloce Extreme shoes feature an updated Powershape sole that Northwave dubs Powershape HT. It has a new ‘high tail’ design, using an asymmetric carbon heel cup that aims to provide better support and thus superior power transfer, with a claimed 4% improvement in max power output in comparison to the orig ..read more
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Specialized Tarmac SL8
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Still one of the best in class, but there are some caveats… Words SAM CHALLIS The Specialized Tarmac SL8 launched at the 2023 World Championships, bagging a gold in the women’s road race under Belgium’s Lotte Kopecky, and accompanied by a raft of claimed performance advantages over the popular SL7. Among these claims is a reduction in weight, with the SL8 frameset coming in around 120g less than an equivalent SL7, plus it is said to be comfier and stiffer too. The biggest claim, however, is that the Tarmac SL8 is finally more aero than the Venge the last Tarmac supplanted, with the new bike b ..read more
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The Last Best Place: Big Ride Montana
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Pristine wilderness, turquoise glacial lakes and climbs for days – including the breathtaking Going-to-the-Sun Road. It doesn’t take long to see why people from the US state of Montana call their home ‘The Last Best Place’ on earth. Cyclist discovers for itself on an unforgettable five-day adventure in Glacier National Park with Trek Travel Words TAM ALLENBY Photography SIMON ESJAY JAMES   The ‘World’s Best Road’ competition doesn’t exist, but if it did, I’d be throwing Going-to- the-Sun Road into the mix. It’s midmorning and I’m on two wheels in Glacier National Park, Montana. The road ..read more
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Thrown for a loop: Big Ride Victoria’s High Country
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Victoria’s High Country may have many of Australia’s best climbs, but as we discovered on the Gaps Loop, exploring its many hidden valleys can be surprisingly rewarding too Words JOEL POTTER Photography SIMON ESJAY JAMES Don’t look up. That seems like a silly thing to say if you’re planning a ride in the Victorian Alps. It’s a region that boasts the highest concentration of Australia’s great road climbs, flaunting an embarrassment of riches like Falls Creek, Mount Hotham and Mount Baw Baw. It’s the closest thing we’ve got to those iconic French-style ski resort climbs, mythologised on our scr ..read more
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Running: friend or foe?
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Will running add strength and speed to your cycling or just undermine your performance on the bike? Cyclist finds out Words MICHAEL DONLEVY Illustration TILL LUKAT   It turns out that pedalling a bike isn’t the only thing you can do with your legs. There’s also this thing called running. But should we be doing it? There are two answers to this, says Hunter Allen, former pro cyclist, owner of The Peaks Coaching Group and cofounder of TrainingPeaks: if you like running, yes; if you don’t like running, no. Let’s get the negatives out of the way first. ‘If you force yourself to go running it ..read more
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Weight training – without weights
Cyclist Magazine
by Cyclist Australia/NZ
1M ago
Get the benefits of functional strength training on the bike, not at the gym Photo Danny Bird It’s well documented that weight training off the bike can lead to performance improvements on it, especially in explosive situations such as sprints and short, steep climbs. But for those who don’t have access to a gym or heavy weights at home, a group of Danish sports scientists has developed and tested a method for getting the same results while cycling. Published in scientific journal Frontiers, the test involved 24 cyclists, including a control group who did their usual training, and a grou ..read more
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