Blogging is Hard – Thoughts on Side Projects and Self-Care
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
Here we are again, or should I say, here I am? It’s been over six months since I posted anything here. If I’ve been keeping track (I have), I’m a year behind on posts. My experience can be summed up by that phrase, it goes something like, “Even the best laid plans don’t work out.”   Let’s do a brief recap and start over. Hi, I’m Aime. If you’re just tuning in, here’s how this whole food blog thing started.   I had a plan, a plan I knew was too ambitious, that slowly but surely came unhinged. One week would pass, then two, then three, a month, two months, and on it went. It’s like I ..read more
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Mulukhiyah, the Collard Greens of the Middle-East
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
When someone invites you over to cook with their mom, especially when their mom’s a chef, don’t decline. Back in May, a Palestinian-American co-worker’s eyes lit up when I told her I was learning how to make Syrian food. She insisted that I come to her apartment to cook with her mom. Me being me, I ignorantly said, “But…you’re not Syrian…” to which she nonchalantly replied, “It’s all the same, we come from the same people.” (Please reference my brief history lesson here.) And so, on a rainy Thursday evening after work, ingredients in tow, I ventured to my co-workers apartment in Brooklyn. Mulu ..read more
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Kunafeh – Shredded fillo dough, cheese, and oh, so much butter
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
I know, I know it’s been a while. Sorry guys and gals. Summer is the busiest time of year at my job, so I’m finally starting to catch up. If you’re lucky enough to follow my insta, @food_hopping, you’ll see that I’m still cooking and taking photos each week, just behind on blog posts. Insta-stories are too easy. Back in May, my friend Rima invited me over to her apartment to make a Syrian dessert. She sent me a list of ingredients, and I met her at her place, completely unaware of what she had planned. Kunafeh or Kunafa is a middle-eastern dessert made with shredded fillo dough, cheese, and a ..read more
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Kibbeh: The National Dish of Syria
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
If you’ve ever had a mediterranean platter, you’ve likely had kibbeh. Kibbeh, pronounced KI (as in KITH) -BEH, is most often (in the US) deep-fried, torpedo-shaped, and filled with some kind of ground meat. In this post, I’ll be showing you how to make stuffed kibbeh, the Syrian way. And, what makes it Syrian exactly?   Time for a brief history lesson…if it’s TL;DR you can scroll down to the recipe. Historically, many countries located east of the mediterranean sea fall into an area called ‘The Levant’. The Levant is generally said to include Cyprus, Israel, Iraq, Jordan, Lebano ..read more
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A month of Syrian food – Humanizing a Crisis
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
I’m sure wherever you’re reading this from, no matter what background you come from, that you’ve heard something about what’s going on in Syria. At the very least you’ve heard something about refugees. You may not know the details of how the country ended up where it is now, you may not realize how much has been lost, and you may not even know how you can help. From what I’ve seen in the media in the US, there is a refugee crisis, there’s no question that millions of civilians, families, mothers, and children have been uprooted and forced to flee, to find somewhere they can call home, someplac ..read more
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5 Things I Learned After Cooking and Eating French Food for One Month – April Recap
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
1. The best food is the simplest. When I think of French food, I think of expensive restaurants, creme brulee, filet mignon, french onion soup. I thought to master it you had to study in France under only the best chefs possibly becoming a total dick (not that I’m a master at this point or a dick, hopefully). Turns out my vision of French food consisted only of fine dining. I had no idea how simple it could be once I broke the recipes down at home. Granted I only made a months worth of food, so I could be wrong. I went into April thinking I was going to spend hou ..read more
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The Best Croissants in New York City – Manhattan Edition
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
In the middle of French month, I made it a mission to find the best croissants in New York City. Growing up, the only croissants I ate were from Walmart, a shame I know. I can’t say they were good…but popped in a toaster oven for a few minutes and they became a warm and crispy treat. (You can’t really go wrong with warm bread, am I right?)   What makes a good croissant? To me, a good croissant must be bought first thing in the morning from a local bakery. A true bakery makes its croissants fresh each day. A good croissant will hold up thro ..read more
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Crème Brûlée Recipe – My Favorite Dessert
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
If crème brûlée is on the menu, I’m ordering it. Of all the crazy new flavors chef’s are making these days: earl grey, chai, passionfruit, green tea, even black sesame crème brûlée, I’m still a purist. There’s nothing better than vanilla bean crème brûlée with a perfectly torched top. Seriously. In college I bought a dozen ramekins thinking I would learn how to make it. Six years later…it finally happened. I did have to buy a torch and all. Here’s what you’ll need:   Print this recipe Ingredients: makes 12 servings 1 whole vanilla bean (or 1 tsp vanilla extract) 1 quart hea ..read more
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Cassoulet – A Bean Casserole from the South of France
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
This is quite possibly the richest casserole I’ve ever eaten. When I think of casserole, I think of 50s housewives in frilly aprons, pulling ‘all-American,’ easy-bake meals out of hot ovens. The stereotype in the US for casseroles (at least while I was growing up) is not at all appetizing. Tuna casserole is the first thing that comes to mind, blech.   Who knew casseroles are originally French? Or at least, the word has a French origin. Cassoulet (CASS-OO-LAY) is a French bean casserole made with an assortment of meats like duck, sausage, pork, and/or chicken. “Cassoulet, that b ..read more
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Pot-au-Feu Recipe – French Beef Stew
Food Hopping
by aimew
2y ago
I’m a big fan of throwing a bunch of meat and vegetables into a pot, then letting them simmer till tender and full of flavor. In figuring out how to plan my months, I’ve been dancing around the idea of consistently making the national dish of each country I do. I think from here on out that’s where I’m going to start, makes sense, right? So…not knowing what to cook the third week in April, I looked up the national dish of France:  Pot-au-feu (POT-O-FOO). Pot-au-feu is a classic French stew made with cheap cuts of beef on the bone, carrots, turnips, leeks, and onions. It’s super ..read more
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