Improve your dressage scores: how and why to ride a give and retake of the reins
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Oscar Williams
1M ago
COMPETITION FEEDBACK JUDGE SHOWING WRONG MOVE HELP HELPING HELPFUL CHESTNUT HORSE DRESSAGE OUTDOOR COMPETING EMOTION UPSET SAD STOCK A well-ridden give and retake of the reins shows that your horse is capable of maintaining self-carriage and balance without relying on your hands to hold them up. It also tests the rider’s reliance on their hands for control, emphasising the importance of an independent seat and legs. Think of the movement as a diagnostic tool for judges. A horse on the forehand will stumble or lose its balance when the reins are given. This shows a reliance on the rider’s hands ..read more
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Want to improve your riding away from the saddle? Try this breathing exercise
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Bethany Stone
2M ago
Most riders are striving to improve their skills, and a breathing exercise could help. Library image. What if I told you there’s a breathing exercise for riders that’ll help you unlock your potential in the saddle and beyond? Like for most equestrians, improving my riding technique is a major priority. However, we in the equestrian community are typically pushed for time with tasks in all areas mounting up – most days there’s barely time for a cuppa, let alone a workout. I found myself thinking: “Can I work on my riding while going about my normal day?” What is diaphragmatic breathing? Accordi ..read more
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We spoke to the British team’s equine physio about cooling down your horse after riding – here’s what you need to know
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Bethany Stone
4M ago
Cooling down your horse after riding is one of those horsemanship practices that should be ingrained in the mind of every rider. It’s the kind of thing we must have been taught at some early stage, but feels like a piece of wisdom that’s been planted in the brain since time immemorial. As a cornerstone of the equestrian community’s collective mental handbook, it stands to reason that cooling down your horse properly is something never to be skipped. But have you ever really drilled down into the mechanics of a cool down, and considered what makes those 5–10 minutes of walk at the end of your ..read more
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10 commandments for competition riders
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Gemma Redrup
4M ago
Sport psychologist Inga Wolframm — who specialises in equestrian sports and offers advice across the disciplines — gives her 10 top pieces of advice for success on competition day. 1. Know your level Ideally, at home you should be training a couple of levels above the one you’re planning to compete at. Why? Because it gives you confidence. A competition is stressful enough without the additional worry of whether you and your horse are able to pull off all the movements in a test or cope with the height/technical requirements of a course. If you can be sure though that the demands of the compe ..read more
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‘Remember you’re dealing with an unpredictable animal’ — how top riders cope when things go wrong
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Becky Murray
5M ago
However much we have prepared, things don’t always go exactly to plan on competition day. Top riders tell us how they stay focused when their competition plans go adrift Library image. How do you cope when things go wrong on competition day? Oliver Townend “I think you just do. You learn to. You just have to! It’s going to happen all the time in eventing where things don’t go to plan and you just have to be quick thinking and change the plan. Often I’ll set off on novices trying to be competitive and they’ll go a little green and I’ll change the plan from being competitive to trying to get a d ..read more
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Master the 10m loop to improve your horse’s balance and earn higher dressage marks
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Bethany Stone
5M ago
Schooling sessions can include a range of moments, including the 10m loop. When watching others ride, the 10-metre loop can look relatively straightforward. But when you’re in the saddle, it can feel like there’s a lot going on. If you feel this way, you might find yourself avoiding them altogether in your schooling sessions. Sound familiar? If so, you could be missing out on a whole host of benefits you could be enjoying by learning how to ride a 10m loop. For starters, 10m loops feature in plenty of dressage tests and lack of accuracy will lose you marks. More broadly, 10m loops are an excel ..read more
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Learning to ride as an adult – what you need to know before you get started
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Emily Bevan
6M ago
One of the beauties of horse riding is that it is never too late to start, or return if you’ve taken a break. It can be done by anyone at any age – The late Queen was riding into her 90s – so if want to get in the saddle, don’t let age be a barrier when learning to ride as an adult. “Even if you have never ridden before, you are never too old to enjoy the company of horses. Many riding schools can cater for tiny tots to riders in their 70s and beyond,” says a BHS spokesperson. “Learning to ride as an adult also means you are fully in control of your progress. The important thing to remember i ..read more
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Laura Tomlinson’s top 5 novice dressage training tips that suit all types of horse
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Oscar Williams
6M ago
Laura Tomlinson shares her top novice training tips. At the British Dressage National Convention (25 November), Horse & Hound columnist Laura Tomlinson hosted a masterclass on how to prepare less experienced horses for competition and shared her top novice dressage training tips. She was joined in the arena by her demo riders, Abbie Newbury on the then five-year-old Seagry Viceroy and Sophie Wallace on the then seven-year-old First Light. We’ve rounded up her top five tips below. 1. The basics matter “Growing up, riding with my Dad and all through my career so far, I was never allowed to ..read more
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Master advanced movements with top tips from Gareth Hughes and Richard Davison
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Oscar Williams
7M ago
Gareth HUGHES (GBR) riding Classic Briolinca during the Grand Prix for the Blue Hors FEI World Dressage Team Championship at the ECCO FEI World Championships in Herning in Denmark between 6th – 14th August 2022 Gareth Hughes and Richard Davison hosted the “Dressage Unwrapped” masterclass at the London International Horse Show 2023, sharing exercises and tips on how to introduce the more advanced dressage movements into your horse’s training. They were joined in the New Horizon Plastics London Arena by their demo riders: Gareth’s daughter and grand prix rider, 16-year-old Ruby Hughes and Class ..read more
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Why rollkur is so damaging to horses: an equine osteopath’s view
Horse & Hound – Horse and rider training
by Jennifer Postollec
8M ago
Jennifer Postollec is a French equine osteopath specialising in biomechanics with more than 15 years experience. She has been living in the UK since 2015 and is the UK’s only certified algotherapy practitioner. She aims to educate owners and riders on why understanding the horse – both physiological and mentally – is key to enhancing the performance and the relationship of the horse and rider partnership. Rolkur/ Hyperflexion of the neck Rollkur or hyperflexion – whatever you choose to call it, this training method is not in the best interest of our horses. But do you understand why it is so ..read more
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