Elevate Your Next Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Egg
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by ICE Staff
1d ago
On this episode of Epicurious' 4 Levels videos, Culinary Arts Chef-Instructor Rémy Forgues demonstrates his rich and flavorful take on the humble grilled cheese sandwich. Chef Rémy uses homemade sourdough bread, which works well with the richness of two kinds of cheese: Emmental for melting and Parmigiano-Reggiano for saltiness. He layers the sandwich with thinly cut prosciutto for flavor and spreads béchamel on top. Related: 5 Best Cheeses for Grilled Cheese His pro trick: cutting a hole in one slice of bread for an egg yolk and broiling the sandwich after grilling. Watch the video to make a ..read more
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New York Times Best Restaurants 2024 Sees ICE Alumni Thriving
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Abbe Lewis
1d ago
"I should have seen it coming last year when my editors put the following headline on my attempt to name the city’s greatest places to eat...That '2023' implies doing it again in 2024," Pete Wells, Restaurant Critic for the New York Times, quipped in this year's edition of the list. Over the last year, Wells revisited the original 100 restaurants to see if they still held up. Twenty-two new restaurants made the cut, including Hillary Sterling's darling Ci Siamo, Carlo Mirachi's two-Michelin-starred Blanca (also at the number two spot) and Trinciti Roti Shop, a Trinidadian and Tobagonian ..read more
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How Dashi Led to the Discovery of MSG
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Olivia Carter
1d ago
At its core, dashi serves as the foundation upon which countless Japanese dishes are built, extending beyond a mere clear broth. Its delicate yet complex taste, characterized by the subtle interplay of umami-rich ingredients like kombu (dried kelp) and katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes), forms the backbone of soups, stews, sauces, marinades and more. From the humble beginnings of a pot of simmering water emerges a versatile and multi-dimensional liquid that enriches every dish it touches. Related: Common Types of Ramen Dashi Ingredients Kombu is a type of brown algae that grows in underwater ..read more
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Blackberry Basil Arugula Salad with Hyssop Blackberry Vinaigrette
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Olivia Roszkowski
1w ago
Cultivating your very own batch of vinegar can be a simpler and swifter process than anticipated. The benefit of DIY-ing your own brew is that you can adjust the acidity level with how long you let the ferment run its course, while simultaneously being able to customize the flavor of your vinegar. Taste your vinegar weekly, and place it in the refrigerator once it has reached your desired level of tang. Hyssop is a vibrant purple flower of the mint family and carries notes of sweetness, licorice and fennel seeds. It grows in the ICE Hydroponic Farm, along with several varieties of herbs like ..read more
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ICE’s Women Chef-Instructors Reflect on Their Time in the Industry
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by ICE Staff
1w ago
The professional kitchen has always been an environment where women have fought for their place. Through many incredible female mentors, progressive kitchen environments and legal protections put into action over the last several decades, the culinary industry is slowly becoming more welcoming to female and BIPOC culinary professionals, bit by bit. Below some of our own ICE Chef-Instructors share their experiences of what it takes to build a career as a female cook. What has your journey been like as a woman in the industry? Chef Luisa DeGirolamo, Chef-Instructor, Pastry & Baking Arts “My ..read more
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Cookbooks Written by Female Chefs
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Hillery Hargadine
2w ago
Women in the kitchen is not a new phenomenon. In fact, you’ll find interviews with chefs across the world, in all types of cuisine and at all levels of sophistication stating they learned to cook from their mother, their grandmother or their auntie. We asked ICE New York’s head librarian Rose Kernochan to recommend what she considers essential reading for Women’s History Month. Below you’ll find her top picks of cookbooks, memoirs and compiled interviews by and about the women who shape kitchens near and far, whether that’s the grandmothers of Africa or chef-owners right here in the US. Read ..read more
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ICE Launches New Scholarships
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Anna Johnson
2w ago
ICE recently announced two new scholarships worth up to $35,000 and 195 high school scholarships worth up to $651,000. All are for students pursuing their dreams in the culinary and hospitality industries and all scholarships reflect ICE's vibrant history, alumni and commitment to culinary excellence. These new scholarships are steps in ICE's continual journey of growth. Year after year, the school has sought to support students seeking aid, and in 2023, was able to award over $700,000 in scholarships. That's nearly $300,000 more than was awarded in 2022. This year, ICE is set to exceed $700 ..read more
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Three Techniques to Try with Radishes
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Cory Sale
2w ago
It’s March, and while the weather is hinting towards warmer days ahead, the Union Square Greenmarket in New York City is still displaying winter’s produce. One ingredient still in abundance is the humble radish, and that’s what ICE's Director of Culinary Affairs Hervé Malivert chose to showcase. Chef Hervé explains that in French cuisine, radishes are served raw, with salt and butter, which helps to balance their spicy taste. Otherwise, this root vegetable is commonly seen pickled or added to salads. Chef Hervé took a non-traditional approach to preparing the ingredient. View this post on ..read more
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ICE Alumnae Who Inspire
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Hillery Hargadine
3w ago
They’re being recognized by The James Beard Foundation Meet the six ICE alumnae who were recognized as semi-finalists for the 2023 James Beard Awards. They’re leading with heart This Marine Corps veteran transitioned from serving her country to serving up sweet treats. They’re business moguls Alumna and culinary force Chef Rachel Yang’s abilities not just in the kitchen, but in the world of restaurant management, have led to an ever-growing empire in the Pacific Northwest. They’re putting pen to paper These five alumnae jumped from the kitchen to the page with the launch of their cookbooks ..read more
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Types of Soy Sauce
The Institute of Culinary Education | DICED Blog
by Olivia Carter
3w ago
Its origins can be traced back over 2,000 years to China, where it emerged as a cornerstone of the cuisine. Trade then carried this liquid gold across the world, where it became deeply woven into the culinary tapestry of each region. This breakdown of the unique soy sauces of China, Japan, Korea and the Philippines will explore their intricate brewing techniques, unique flavor profiles and the irreplaceable roles they play in defining each nation's cuisine. China: The Birthplace and Master of Soy Sauce In the culinary realm of China, soy sauce reigns supreme, enriching dishes with its distinct ..read more
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