Anglo-Catholic Missions in Africa and Why they Matter
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
18h ago
      I had the pleasure of offering a presentation on this topic last week at the historic Church of the Advent in Boston. Here I will give you a precis of the talk. This is valuable not least because of the strong Anglo-Catholic history of our own diocese. We think of the high church movement pertaining to liturgical, spiritual and doctrinal renewal. But at its origins it was also a missionary movement. Its story, however, cannot be told without saying something about its counterpart, the evangelical revival. While sometimes they competed, they also goaded each othe ..read more
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Sermon at Grace Community
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
1w ago
Sermon for Lent 1 preached at Grace Community, Plano, and translated into Farsi and Arabic Last time I preached here, I mentioned chess, which, I learned had a very clear Persian connection! I want to start this sermon with another one, though more obscure.  A little more than a century after the death and resurrection of Jesus, there was a disciple of His who died in Adiabene, which was a northern province of Persia. His name was Tatian. He was faithful, though some of ideas were seen by some as extreme, for example about fasting. But he did ask a very reasonable question- why have four ..read more
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Above the Below
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
2w ago
Sometimes the deepest questions are both obvious and surprising at the same time. The very first question for the early Christians was this: how could God’s chosen be the crucified, since this was an accursed kind of death?  They weren’t expecting that, for the most part. They worked it out by listening again to the books that we call ‘the Old Testament,’ though they were simply ‘the bible,’ since the book we call the New Testament were only beginning to be written.  But wait a minute. The good news about Jesus were new. And their proclamation of grace was different than the holy wor ..read more
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What if the Most Radical Thought is the Simplest: A Pre-Lenten Memo to Myself
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
3w ago
Thirty years ago, I read an article about some youth groups of liberal Presbyterian Churches in the bay area. The teenagers stumbled upon the Jesus Prayer, silent devotion, lectio divina, and icons. Youth group meetings got very quiet. The parents became worried- was this some kind of cult the kids had gotten into? Suddenly traditional Christian prayer had an edge of rebellion, which only made it more appealing!  And, even in that simpler age tech-wise, the young people came to enjoy the silence.  Similarly I have heard of Catholic youth groups saying the Rosary as they meet  in ..read more
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The Roots of our Catholic and Reformed Identity
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by
3w ago
Dear brothers and sisters, A year ago I taught a course on Anglicanism at Truett/Baylor. I thought that I would post from time to time parts of lectures for that course. Here is one that deals with the prelude to the Reformation, and the roots of our thinking of ourselves as both catholic and reformed. Peace +GRS In this talk I want to set him in the context of the late medieval period for the  Anglicanism of the Reformation period. Here we are borrowing from the perspective of scholars like Heiko Oberman and Stephen Ozment, for whom the break between late medieval and reformation is not ..read more
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The Sacrament of Unity
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
1M ago
Sunday by Sunday I visit parishes, usually to confirm and receive into our Church. These liturgies by their very nature have an ‘Episcopal specific’ nature, which is in fact explicit in the formula for reception: ‘we receive you into the fellowship of this Communion.’ For this reason, it is important to recall how the service begins, with a quotation for Ephesians 4: ‘one Lord, one faith, one baptism…one God and Father of all.’  Baptism as our ecumenical sacrament is the launch-pad for everything else we have to say and pray (one might push back by observing that the baptism of infants re ..read more
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The God Who Runs into the Burning Building
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
1M ago
What are the dates in history about which we all recall where we were we heard the news? For sure, the assassination of President Kennedy- I was on the playground at recess in third grade at Norway Street School in Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Another, for sure, was the first step taken on the moon, in the evening of July 20, 1969.  Alas 9-11. Then there are local add-ons: for me game four of the Series in 2004 as the Red Sox team that called themselves ‘the idiots’ run onto the field.  I would venture to guess some of you Ranger fans would say November 1, of this year!  And with ..read more
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God Who Runs into the Building
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
1M ago
What are the dates in history about which we all recall where we were we heard the news? For sure, the assassination of President Kennedy- I was on the playground at recess in third grade at Norway Street School in Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Another, for sure, was the first step taken on the moon, in the evening of July 20, 1969.  Alas 9-11. Then there are local add-ons: for me game four of the Series in 2004 as the Red Sox team that called themselves ‘the idiots’ run onto the field.  I would venture to guess some of you Ranger fans would say November 1, of this year!  And with ..read more
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Hot and Cold
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
1M ago
Stephanie and I were recently in a cab in London on the way to Paddington Station. The cabbie was half driver half tour guide, in a entertaining way. We drove past a corner of Hyde Park, and he said that it was what the locals called ‘Hot and Cold Corner.’ What does that mean? It turns out it was where the National Geographic Society building, with two statues on the front wall looking out on the corner in question. The first one, Hot, is David Livingstone, doctor-missionary-activist-explorer through east Africa, in the mith century, and the second, Ernest Shackleford, sailor and trekker in th ..read more
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All Sermons Are Equal
The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas » Bishops' Blog
by The Rt. Rev. George Sumner
4M ago
(Delivered at Founders’ Chapel, Wycliffe College, Toronto, October 15, 2023)      All sermons are equal, but some are more equal than others. The bishop visiting the seminary tries to take his or her homiletical game up a notch, by doing some homework. In my case this has involved reading a slim volume called Primitive Christian Catechism. The immediate reason was that the author was Philip Carrington, bishop of Quebec a century ago, and biographer of his predecessor, the great missionary bishop George Mountain, depicted shooting the rapids another century earlier, in his c ..read more
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