Occupational Therapy Doctorate OR Master’s
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by cara
6M ago
This post was written by our own Brandi Myles. See her bio after the post. Hello all, As I am nearing the end of my OTD program I have compiled a list of 4 reasons why I am happy I chose the doctoral route. 1) I can be a bit of a perfectionist: An OTD program requires more clinical training with its classification as a clinical or practice-based degree. Along with the additional hands-on training, I had time for additional classes with in-depth training to lead within the field of OT, advocate, and understand and produce clinical research. More time to perfect my craft and learn my personal ..read more
Visit website
20 Summer Activities….Shhhh, they’re therapeutic!
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
SUMMER!     It’s here! Most families look forward to summer’s relaxation and lazy days. However, the lack of routine and structure can be the cause of great stress for families of some children. School routines are predictable and provide consistency and the transition to summer may be a difficult one. In addition, the skills your child has gained in school should be carried over into the summer to stop any regression. No ideas? Feeling overwhelmed? Never fear, our ‘Out of the Pocket Tips’ are here! Try to keep a routine. Look at the calendar together and make a routine for your fa ..read more
Visit website
Google Eye Slime!
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
Everyone LOVES slime! Slime is great for sensory, especially the tactile or touch sense. Kids all over enjoy making and playing with slime. We know that following a recipe and planning the outcome helps children to develop executive function skills. What are they? read my earlier blog post if you are looking for more information on the critical importance of building executive function skills. Let’s build some GOOGLE EYE SLIME…….. Materials: Borax White school glue Water Green food coloring Googly eyes Black glitter Two large bowls Instructions: In one bowl, mix together ¾ of a teaspoon of ..read more
Visit website
MONSTER Eye Cupcakes
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
  Halloween brings out the fun in us. Kids and grownups enjoy dressing up and decorating for fall. Working on life skills includes baking, shopping, and following directions. Making cupcakes is a yummy way to improve fine motor skills, creativity, and executive function. PLUS: While we are on the topic of eyeballs, here’s a link to one of my most popular posts~ Vision, It’s More Than Meets the Eye! Ingredients: 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons baking powder 3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1/8 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons butter, softened 1 1/2 cups white ..read more
Visit website
Halloween Noodles Sensory Play
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
Halloween Noodles – Sensory Play! Halloween-themed noodles make OOEY GOOEY FUN for little fingers! This activity works in sensory, fine motor, visual-motor skills. Searching for items within the noodles makes sensory play fun. This is a Halloween activity BUT feel free to change the color of the noodles (step 4) to ANY color. Instead of Halloween toys, add sea life toys, dinosaurs, as pictured below (I’ve given you my Amazon link to ones I love and use). As with ANY toy, choose toys that are not choking hazards or closely supervise children during play. Halloween Noodles Sensory Activity Here ..read more
Visit website
5 Halloween Tips for Children With Special Needs
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
Halloween!  Awesome for some….torture for others.  To our children with autism, Sensory Processing Disorder, food allergies, and many more, Halloween can be frightful and not because of the ghosts and goblins!  As with any holiday, Halloween brings with it many changes.  The visual stimuli of pumpkins, costumes, and decorations may be quite overwhelming for kids!  It’s true that children with autism can have difficulty with ANY environmental changes.  Not only is the weather changing to cooler temperatures, but also, the clothes kids wear ..read more
Visit website
Auditory Processing Disorder 101
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
Auditory processing disorders are often masked as other things. Sometimes, people think kids aren’t paying attention or are daydreaming. In fact, it can take the brain some extra time to process the information coming through the auditory system. What are some signs of auditory processing disorder or APD? Is your child easily distracted or unusually bothered by loud or sudden noises? Are noisy environments upsetting to your child? Does your child’s behavior and performance improve in quieter settings? Does your child have difficulty following directions, whether simple or complicated? Does yo ..read more
Visit website
Idioms, What Did You Say and What Do You Really Mean?
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
It’s Raining Cats and Dogs! Idioms or phrases that cannot be understood through their literal meaning can be rather confusing for students with language difficulties. Teaching children and students common idioms can help them navigate verbal communication with adults and peers as well as improve their writing skills. My sons had SUCH a difficult time (and still sometimes do) with idioms. We use so many in conversation but not knowing what others mean can cause social communication trouble.   Out of the POCKET Tips: Here are some common idioms used in writing. Idioms About Money There are ..read more
Visit website
5 Ways to Add Movement to Learning
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
Sit Still and Pay Attention! How many times have we heard this in our lives? I know my generation was expected to sit without fidgeting or moving during learning activities. If we didn’t, there was punishment or reprimand. Unfortunately, things are changing and research has shown that movement and brain breaks should be built into every child’s daily routine. My earlier post gives tips for brain breaks, breathing, and fidgets. Check it out here. We learn best when we involve multiple senses. Our brains crave new or novel activities. Kids are full of excitement for learning and their brains are ..read more
Visit website
What Are Pre Writing Skills?
PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist
by HustleFish
7M ago
What are pre-writing skills and why does my child need them? Babies are born with hands that are curled up and only reflexively grasp their caregiver’s finger. Through practice and play they quickly learn that their actions cause their toy to light up or their body to move around in space. The hands become stronger and their fine motor (small muscle) skills become more refined. Of course, we would not give a baby a pencil and ask him/her to write in cursive! The use of a crayon comes through practice holding other – more interesting items to baby like food and their bottle. Then comes big and ..read more
Visit website

Follow PocketOT | The Pocket Occupational Therapist on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR