How to Stop Gaslighting Your Memoir Writing Process
Jane Friedman
by Lisa Cooper Ellison
2d ago
Photo by Kristina Flour on Unsplash Today’s post is by writer and editor Lisa Cooper Ellison. Join her on Wednesday, June 19, for the online class The Psychology of Character Development for Memoirists. Here are two of the most hated pieces of feedback I’ve given to writers of tough stories:   Your story needs more levity. Your antagonist needs to be more balanced. In response, I’ve watched writers who’ve endured extensive abuse grit their teeth and force themselves to write about the one time Mom took them for ice cream or said a kind thing in hopes of pleasing me. “There,” t ..read more
Visit website
Is Your Story “Big Enough” to Write About?
Jane Friedman
by Robin Finn
2d ago
Photo by Pixabay Today’s post is excerpted from Heart. Soul. Pen.: Find Your Voice on the Page and in Your Life by Robin Finn (Morehouse Publishing). Limiting beliefs (also called misbeliefs) are judgments or misinterpretations of reality that hold us back or limit what we can do, be, or achieve. One of the most powerful breakthroughs I had while studying spiritual psychology was that I could change my belief system. I learned that I could consciously identify, revise, and release any beliefs I had that did not serve me, made me miserable, or held me back. I did not have to hold onto ..read more
Visit website
Defining Negative Space in Story
Jane Friedman
by Deborah Ann Lucas
4d ago
Photo by Randy Laybourne on Unsplash Today’s post is by author and book coach Deborah Ann Lucas. I’m a writer who struggles to process information audibly and an artist who is not visual: I can’t absorb and remember the shapes I see. Instead, I’m an intuitive learner and writer, perceiving and processing the world through a different channel than most—kinesthetically. I learn best through touch and my sense of space. This could be considered a disadvantage. But I’ve turned it into an advantage by applying spatial concepts to see the shape of things in my writing. In college, I gained creative ..read more
Visit website
The Double-Edged Sword of List Building Promotions
Jane Friedman
by Brenda E Smith
1w ago
Today’s post is by author Brenda E Smith. I realized a lifelong dream when I self-published my first book in August 2023. I followed all the marketing advice I received about entering the publishing world, including creating a website and selecting an email service provider. On the last page of my book, I added a reader magnet meant to collect email addresses of enthusiastic readers who would enjoy receiving my newsletters. Like many new authors, my original email list numbered about 100, primarily family, friends and work colleagues. I had a long way to go to reach the limit of 1,0 ..read more
Visit website
How to Write Compelling Inner Conflict
Jane Friedman
by Angela Ackerman
1w ago
Photo by Alex Vámos on Unsplash Today’s post is by Angela Ackerman, co-author of the new second edition of The Emotion Amplifier Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Stress and Volatility. Readers connect with characters who are true-to-life, so as we build our story’s cast, we want to ensure they think and behave as real people do. This is especially important when it comes to inner conflict as readers are exposed to a character’s personal struggles and insecurities. These moments are powerful points of connection, so how can we show a character’s inner turmoil in a way that rem ..read more
Visit website
5 Reasons You Should Consider Writing Your Memoir in Present Tense
Jane Friedman
by Gina DeMillo Wagner
1w ago
Photo by Fallon Michael on Unsplash Today’s post is by author Gina DeMillo Wagner, author of Forces of Nature. Amazon • Bookshop When my memoir Forces of Nature was on submission with publishers, one editor said she loved the story, but couldn’t get past the fact that I had written it in present tense. In her mind, I’d broken a universal rule: Memoir is about the past and therefore should always be past tense. I respectfully disagreed (and sold the book to a different publisher who shared my vision). From the very beginning, I felt my story demanded to be told in the presen ..read more
Visit website
3 Book Marketing Misconceptions and What to Do Instead
Jane Friedman
by Angie Isaacs
2w ago
Today’s post is by children’s author and digital strategist Angie Isaacs. Show of hands, writers, how many of you love book marketing? I can’t see through your screen, but I know very few of you have your hands up. Authors hate what they think marketing is. Like most writers, I was not initially thrilled with marketing. But the more I learned, the more my feelings about marketing shifted. Not only is my marketing more successful now, I also enjoy it! (Yes, really!) I’ve seen the same thing with other writers—their feelings about marketing shift. Not everyone comes to love it, but th ..read more
Visit website
Embrace Complication to Develop a Can’t-Put-It-Down Narrative
Jane Friedman
by Susanne Dunlap
2w ago
Photo by Espen Bierud on Unsplash Today’s post is by author and book coach Susanne Dunlap. There are many ways to create forward momentum in a story: layering in unanswered questions that create suspense, for instance. Or building a solid cause/effect trajectory from scene to scene, and having your protagonists move inexorably forward on their character arcs via action>reaction>decision>consequence. But there’s another craft element that amps up that momentum not by pushing the story along its established arc more quickly, but by frustrating that progress in a way that acts like ..read more
Visit website
Your Small Press Submission Checklist
Jane Friedman
by Julie Artz
2w ago
Photo by Oleksandr P Today’s post is by author, editor, and book coach Julie Artz (@julieartz). Download her Craft Your Query Workbook. There’s been a lot of discussion recently about the challenges around publishing with the Big Five, some of it overblown and some of it valid. If you’ve been reading this blog for any time at all, you’ve probably seen some really excellent discussion of alternative options, either in Jane’s Key Book Publishing Paths report, or in her deeper dive into how to evaluate small presses, or in a recent post about the case for pursuing a ..read more
Visit website
Avoid, Persevere, Endure, Fight: 4 Goals for Unforgettable Opening Scenes
Jane Friedman
by Ayesha Ali
3w ago
Photo by Nate Neelson on Unsplash Today’s post is by book coach Ayesha Ali. Your protagonist must have a story goal. That is a piece of writing advice that rarely gets elaborated upon. Sure, it’s easy to identify a protagonist’s goal in a quest story, romance or mystery, but even in these novels, the action might not begin until chapters 4 or 5. So what does your character do in these early chapters when things haven’t been shaken up yet? Most story structure guides begin with an exploration of the Normal World. The Normal World serves an important purpose: it introduces you to the protag ..read more
Visit website

Follow Jane Friedman on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR