Some Good News in Alzheimer’s Treatments
The Incidental Economist
by Tiffany Doherty
1w ago
The surprising approval of the extremely expensive and maybe not that effective drug Aduhelm has been dominating the conversation around Alzheimer’s treatments in recent memory. Today, we’re getting positive and talking about a very promising drug that’s making its way through the research and approval pipeline.    The post Some Good News in Alzheimer’s Treatments first appeared on The Incidental Economist ..read more
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A Polio Case in the United States. What Does it Mean?
The Incidental Economist
by Tiffany Doherty
2w ago
A vaccine-derived polio case was reported in the United States recently, despite the fact that the polio vaccine effectively eradicated polio in the US decades ago. What is polio exactly? How did a polio case crop up in the US and what is vaccine-derived polio? What does this mean for future community spread?    The post A Polio Case in the United States. What Does it Mean? first appeared on The Incidental Economist ..read more
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Prison health care is only available if you can afford it
The Incidental Economist
by Cecille Joan Avila
3w ago
Often, people who are incarcerated are required to pay a co-pay for medical care that they initiate. While the cost of this co-pay may appear low, it can have high human costs, especially if it means that individuals ultimately delay seeking care. In a recent piece for Prism Reports, I talk about prison co-pays and the impact that they can have on people who are incarcerated, particularly for women and people of color: These risks become even higher for marginalized people in carceral facilities, who tend to be Black, Latinx, and other people of color, often in poorer health than the general ..read more
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President Biden’s Executive Order isn’t enough to end Conversion Therapy
The Incidental Economist
by Kristina Carvalho
3w ago
Content Warning: Sensitive topics are discussed throughout this article, including suicide. This summer, President Biden signed an executive order to prohibit federally-funded programs from offering conversion therapy, an ineffective and unethical practice to change an individual’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity. While an important political statement, it’s likely not enough to end the practice altogether. Forward progress will only happen with legal and regulatory changes at both the national and local levels. Originating in 1973, conversion therapy became an umbrella term to descr ..read more
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Who is innovation in the US health care system actually for?
The Incidental Economist
by Gabriella Aboulafia
1M ago
Innovation is considered one of the American health care system’s strengths. In theory, innovation makes health care better and less expensive because it leads to new treatments and lower costs. But because innovation and new therapies exist in the context of disparities in coverage and access to care, these benefits are not felt equally across the population; innovation itself has the potential to exacerbate and deepen existing disparities. Innovation, particularly in drug manufacturing, has become a significant priority for the private industry. In 2019, the pharmaceutical industry spen ..read more
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Why Isn’t there a Birth Control Pill for Males?
The Incidental Economist
by Tiffany Doherty
1M ago
Condoms and vasectomies remain pretty much the extent of birth control options for people who produce sperm, and both have problems. So why is almost all hormonal birth control aimed at those with ovaries? There have been some successes targeting the biological feedback process for hormones that regulate new sperm production, but progress is slow.    The post Why Isn’t there a Birth Control Pill for Males? first appeared on The Incidental Economist ..read more
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Without supports for direct home care workers, older adults are at risk of unwanted nursing home admissions
The Incidental Economist
by Melissa Garrido
1M ago
The need for direct home care workers — health professionals who work with individuals in their homes — is growing, and demand outpaces supply. In the US, states can use American Rescue Plan funds to expand their direct care workforce, but this funding expires in 2025. Without a sustainable plan to recruit and retain direct care workers, aging Baby Boomers are at risk of unwanted nursing home admissions. Direct care workers include personal care aides, home health aides, and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). All provide assistance with activities of daily living — tasks like feeding or bath ..read more
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The middle-age update post
The Incidental Economist
by Austin Frakt
1M ago
I really had no intention of posting an update on some of the middle-age ailments I’ve written about before. But I keep getting questions about them, some by email. Because of ailment number one below, I just can’t respond at length to each email. So, here goes. You asked for this. (No, not all of you. If you didn’t, just stop reading.) 1. Arms: Backstory here. For work, and a little bit for non-work, I spend a lot of time with my hands on a keyboard, to say nothing of my face in a screen. Because I have to manage the tendinitis in my arms (see backstory), I can’t write as much email or other ..read more
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The end of the public health emergency and impending coverage loss
The Incidental Economist
by Gabriella Aboulafia
1M ago
In a new op-ed for MedPage Today, Paul Shafer and I explain how the end of the public health emergency (PHE) and Medicaid continuous enrollment condition (CEC) will lead to significant coverage loss, specifically among people who are still eligible for coverage. When regular Medicaid redeterminations resume after the end of the PHE, if people don’t update their contact information or respond to state notices within a certain amount of time, they’ll be at risk of losing their coverage, despite still being eligible. The effect of the end of the CEC won’t be felt equally across populations. Peopl ..read more
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What Does “Good” Qualitative Research Look Like?
The Incidental Economist
by Izabela Sadej
1M ago
Qualitative research uses non-numerical data to explain what, why, and how something happened. It provides a contextual understanding of people, behaviors, and situations that quantitative studies often can’t. There are ongoing conversations in the scientific community about what a “good” qualitative study entails. While the specific criteria are subject to debate, there are some widely accepted guidelines to consider. These include: Use of theory to inform research questions, design, and interpretation of findings. Explaining the decision-making process behind choosing study design, methodol ..read more
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