Sarongs in Bali: Purpose and Purchasing
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1w ago
By Bradley Phelps Sarongs Tourists in Bali partake in various activities, some of which are recreational, cultural, or spiritual in nature. Visiting temples and appreciating the Hindu influence on Balinese is a common activity. Temples are found in nearly all villages and towns. Some are water temples connected to the subaks on Bali, while others are simply local temples unconnected to the water sharing system. Sarongs are required at many temples, especially to enter certain sections of the temples. The cultural importance is understood even by the government, as shown by President Jokowi’s e ..read more
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“When in Bali, Expect a Wayan” — Balinese Naming Traditions
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
3w ago
By Sharon Elinam Yorms-Brobbey “I wish Anglo names had more meaning to them than just how good they sound,” said a colleague as we sat at the table after dinner in Medan, the biggest city in North Sumatra and third biggest city in Indonesia, as we engaged in small talk and sipped our drinks. Our conversation revolved around the naming practices in Ghana, where I grew up, and how the Ghanaian names indicated the day of the week someone was born, leading to a sense of connection even among strangers. We shared a laugh as he mentioned his former classmate named “Kofi,” a name peculiar to Ghanaian ..read more
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A Taste of Bali: A Brief Look Into the Island’s Culinary Traditions
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
3w ago
By Bradley Russ Bali is an island renowned for its beautiful views, bustling tourism industry, and friendly people. It is also an island with a rich food culture. Delicious meals all start at the market, where you can find everything you’d need to make a delectable Balinese dish. Balinese people historically went  to the market daily, and did all of their cooking in the morning, storing the rest of the day’s meals for lunch and dinner. It’s for this reason that Balinese prefer their meat and fish cooked well done to prevent spoilage and ruin their later meals. However, refrigeration has c ..read more
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The Magical Balinese House
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
3w ago
By Tania Lamprea Once upon a time, in the enchanting land of Bali, there stood a village filled with houses that held secrets and stories as unique as the vibrant culture itself. This is the tale of the Balinese house, where superstitions, offerings, and timeless rituals whispered tales of connection and harmony.  In the heart of the village, families craft their homes with a special wisdom, mirroring the design after the human body. Picture this: An entrance like a welcoming mouth, a narrow path resembling a digestive tract leading to a central courtyard, the main room as the head, and a ..read more
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Discovering Harmony: The Canang Sari Offering in Bali
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1M ago
By JaKyah Beatty In the heart of Bali’s rich cultural tapestry lies a tradition that whispers a profound message to those willing to listen: the Canang Sari offering. As I roamed the tourist-filled streets of Ubud, I found myself surrounded by small, flower-shaped creations adorning every corner. They are literally everywhere, in doorways, on sidewalks, in front of temples, on shelves. I found myself playing a game of hopscotch trying not to step on them. Little did I know, these intricate colorful flower-shaped creations were offerings that held the key to a lesson in balance, gratitude, and ..read more
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Global warming and the shifting landscape of deforestation in Indonesia: Can economic opportunity and environmental sustainability coexist in the future?
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1y ago
◆ ◆ ◆ “The fact is that no species has ever had such wholesale control over everything on earth, living or dead, as we now have. That lays upon us, whether we like it or not, an awesome responsibility. In our hands now lies not only our own future, but that of all other living creatures with whom we share the earth.” –– Sir David Attenborough, Life on Earth, 1976. Source: http://earth.org/endangered-species-quotes/. ◆ ◆ ◆ Forests worldwide play a critical role in mitigating climate change and supporting life on Earth. These verdant ecosystems have a strong influence on the terrestrial carbon c ..read more
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Forest Management – Economically Productive and Environmentally Responsible
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1y ago
Indonesia’s size, tropical climate, and archipelagic geography supports one of the world’s highest levels of biodiversity with 74 types of ecosystems, 15.5 percent of world’s flora, and 16 percent of the world’s mammals (CIFOR – ICRAF, 2022). Additionally, trees and forests in the country are critical to the economy, livelihoods, and the environment as 120 M ha (about 64 percent) of the land area is forest, 34 percent of Indonesian villagers live inside or on the fringes of forest areas, more than 285,000 ha Indonesians grow food on land under social forestry licenses in 30 provinces, and more ..read more
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Questionable Practices of Animal Welfare in Indonesia
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1y ago
I. Preface:   I titled this piece questionable practices related to Animal Welfare instead of something more directly critical because I think there’s a missing piece in a lot of the articles that I read while researching this topic.  I think articles from the West criticizing Indonesian behavior need to do a better job of acknowledging the direct role colonialism and neocolonialism play in modern Indonesia.  Although the Dutch were the primary colonizers of Indonesia, the Portuguese, Spanish, British, and Japanese, all had their turns extracting massive amounts of Indonesi ..read more
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Snapshot: Wildlife trafficking in Indonesia
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1y ago
Indonesia has been the epicenter of the wildlife trafficking crisis across the world. One generation ago, the islands in SouthEast Asia were covered with rhinos, elephants, orangutans, tigers, and so much biodiversity. Since then, there has been a steady decline in the population of all of these animals, some resulting in extinction. There are many factors that have contributed to this decline, including climate change, deforestation, and lack of protection from the government. By far, the most impactful has been the lack of protection from the government. Indonesia has the largest market for ..read more
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Snapshot: Traffic in Jakarta
Public Policy Indonesia
by publicpolicyindonesia
1y ago
According to Novelist Seno Gumira Ajidarma, the average Jakartan spends 10 years of their life in traffic (Mead, 2016), and you don’t need to spend much time in the Indonesian capital to believe it. We had several opportunities to witness the worst of traffic during our time in Indonesia, but the most memorable one was while we were traveling from Bogor to Jakarta to visit a Mangrove Restoration Project. According to a 2015 rating based on satellite navigation data, Jakarta has the worst traffic in the world, with the average vehicle making more than 33,000 starts and stops each year (Mead, 20 ..read more
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