Coffee break, Kittiwake
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
2w ago
Mines a flat white, maybe a gingerbread biscuit too. There’s a Herring gull at my feet, trying to look cute, but mostly just looking intimidating, circling the table and carefully watching with piercing pale eyes as I eat. Like many seaside towns, the cries of gulls ring out through the streets, but here, it’s a slim, snow white gull, repeating it’s name over and over again. The Kittiwake, an elegant seabird with greenish yellow bill, wingtips dipped in the blackest ink and a silver grey back. These pretty birds nest in colonies on rocky cliffs, but with the absence of cliffs in this part of t ..read more
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Rodney
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
1M ago
Affectionately known as ‘Rodney’ to locals, (thanks to Mike Webb’s brilliant cartoon ‘Mere Quacks’ in our local newspaper, the Diss Express), this special arachnid can be found down at Redgrave and Lopham Fen, managed by Suffolk Wildlife Trust. The Fen Raft Spider (Dolomedes plantarius) is one of our largest and rarest spiders. Thanks to extensive and determined conservation efforts it can now be found at 7 sites in the UK, up from just 3 in 2003. But it is still very much a rarity. I’ve lived near here for over 30 years now, and have only seen this magnificent animal 3 times! Despite bei ..read more
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Orchids and Auroras
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
2M ago
My social media feeds have turned pink and green. As many others did, I left the comfort of my warm bed on Friday night and travelled a short distance to avoid the glow of Norwich on the horizon. As I stepped out of the car I could see a pale misty band across the Northern sky and knew straight away the lights were beginning to show. I took a couple of test shots and there it was, a soft green light alive on my preview screen. It’s like suddenly discovering something hidden. To the naked eye merely a grey mist of light, but to my camera, green and glowing. I took photos and looked around, and ..read more
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Love on the red cliff
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
4M ago
Late February. I’ve been visiting one of the very few seabird colonies in Norfolk. East Anglia is well known for it’s general flatness, so the sheer cliffs required to attract breeding sea birds are very rare. One place however, is Hunstanton, with it’s famous red and white cliffs. The red rocks are actually made of chalk with iron providing the rich red colour, and on top of that is a layer of white chalk, both of these laid down in shallow marine conditions during the Cretaceous period. The soft crumbling rock face provides plenty of ledges and nooks for a mini albatross to rest. These hands ..read more
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Hello 2024
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
6M ago
There’s nothing like a new year and upcoming milestone birthday to put you in a reflective mood. Photography has always been my passion, and by that I mean, puts me in the ‘satisfyingly busy’ freedom of flow state. When watching wildlife and creating images, time passes without a trace. Meditation with a camera. I always want to do more. I have this creeping anxiety that I just haven’t achieved enough in my life so far, but I can never fathom what the big amazing thing is that I should have done. It makes me feel forgetful. Anyway, to quash the anxiety and fulfill my wish to simply get out wit ..read more
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Jurassic gardens
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
10M ago
Don’t move. He can’t see us if we don’t move. The reptile tips his head. Patterned scales glint in the sun, golden eye, unblinking, watches us, time slows. But we’re not keeping still because we’re trying to avoid becoming a dinosaur’s dinner. We’re not moving so we don’t disturb the mini velociraptor in front of us. I’m being dramatic. This little lizard is about as far removed from a dinosaur as you and I, but they do look the part. We have 3 native lizard species in the UK: the glorious golden Common or Viviparous Lizard, Zootoca vivipara, (feature of my last blog post), often found on the ..read more
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The Littlest Dragon
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
1y ago
Ok, I admit it. Lizards. My favourite species to photograph. Don’t get me wrong, I love the hares and the barns owls too, but lizards, so full of character, so fascinating in their little macro world. It absorbs me, my attention, I could spend hours watching, yet to me feels like barely a few minutes. I’m watching one now, well I’m trying. The gravel path is fighting against me. A slow approach is best. Lizards have different characters, some bold or calm, some skittish, and it depends on the weather too. This one is relaxed, so I edge closer, wincing in pain as my elbow meets yet another ston ..read more
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Tails from Scotland
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
1y ago
Just back from a week away in Dumfries and Galloway, and I must say, what a stunning place to visit. The landscape is beautiful, with a view around every corner, the coastline rugged and filled with nature, and birds and wildlife abound. Whilst I did attempt to have a relaxing time as I really did need a break, I couldn’t resist trying to get my camera in front of some wildlife. One species I was really hoping to see was the Red squirrel, our native squirrel whose decline is well documented. This little russet rodent is still hanging on in there, and I’m really hoping the ongoing conservation ..read more
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Green-winged Glory
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
1y ago
I spent a morning in May at a local meadow, photographing these beautiful native orchids. I often think our native botanical riches are a bit overlooked, but we do have a fascinating selection of species here, and I will definately be trying to explore more in the future. The Green-winged orchid is one of around 45 orchid species to be found in the UK, it grows in unimproved grassland and flowers between May and June. The attractive spikes of flowers are highly variable in colour, ranging from deep magenta, to delicate pale pink, right through to white. The sides of the individual flowers are ..read more
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Bempton Cliffs
Dawn Monrose Nature Photography Blog
by Dawn
1y ago
I have only ever visited Bempton out of season, when the Gannets still swoop and soar, but not much else is around. Trips to the rugged, windswept cliff tops have caused both sunburn and a soaking on previous occasions. From May the area is a seabird city, with half a million nesting birds. The Gannets are the real stars of the show, huge prehistoric looking birds, white and shining against the sea below with creamy, golden necks and startling blue eyes. They really are incredible to watch as they glide past so closely and then curl away over the water. As we walked along the cliff top path ..read more
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