Theatre in the Real World: Professional Profile
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
11M ago
“I don’t want to be an actor!” is one reason why students may not want to take drama class. However, there are a whole host of careers in the theatre that aren’t acting. The following individual exercise gives students the opportunity to discover and explore different jobs in the theatrical world, including experience needed, responsibilities ..read more
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Theatre in the Real World: Create Your Own Company
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
11M ago
Here is a group project that is a great complement to our last blog post, Theatre in the Real World: Theatre Company Profile. Your students have been introduced to various theatre companies, all with unique histories, facilities, and artistic goals. Now, they’re going to create their own theatre companies, specially tailored to their unique interests ..read more
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Small Group Exercise: Summarize a Play in Verse
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
1y ago
In this small group exercise, students will write a creative summary of the plot of a play using the ABCB, or “simple 4-line” rhyme scheme. This exercise focuses on creative thinking and teamwork. If you wish to expand this exercise, you can add a performance component, where the group members will perform the piece they ..read more
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Classic Improv Game: Commercials
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
1y ago
Advertisements and commercials can be entertaining, educational, heart wrenching, and hilarious. Ultimately though, the goal is to grab your attention, tell you about the product, and get you to part with your hard-earned cash in exchange for whatever they’re selling — as efficiently as possible. In this improv game, students are tasked with improvising an ..read more
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Acting in Everyday Life
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
1y ago
Many students take drama class not because they want to, but because they have to. They might need an arts credit to graduate, or there aren’t any other options for them to have a full class schedule, or they are looking for a class that they think is easy. So how do we engage our ..read more
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Theatre Game: Origin Story
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
1y ago
The following theatre game is a variation of the exercise “The 20 Step Process“. In The 20 Step Process, students are challenged to make a simple task comically complicated. In Origin Story, students separate the aspects of one seemingly simple task and explain how each part came to be. Students will see (in an exaggerated ..read more
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Helping Students Deal With Stage Fright
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Lindsay Price
1y ago
You’ve chosen a play, cast your actors, run lines and are preparing for the rise of the curtain. But as opening night approaches the nerves and the butterflies are taking up more stage time for some actors than they should. How do you help your actors deal with stage fright so their performances can shine ..read more
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Resource: Tons of Fast & Slow Prompts
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
1y ago
Speed up! Slow down! Hurry hurry — but hang on! Sometimes you need some speed-related prompts for your improvisation games or playwriting projects, and we won’t keep you waiting. Here is a collection of 25 speedy and 25 languid prompts (50 prompts total!), with a collection of exit slip questions and a handy link round-up ..read more
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Top 5 Discipline Mistakes New Teachers Make (And how to fix them!)
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Lindsay Price
1y ago
Welcome to Top 5! In this series we look at some of the challenges new teachers face and how to address them. Whether it is avoiding mistakes, improving planning and preparation, or advocating for your program, this information will help new Theatre teachers successfully navigate the first few years in their classroom. Top 5 Discipline ..read more
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Character Movement: Speed Up, Slow Down
The Theatrefolk Blog
by Kerry Hishon
1y ago
The following exercise challenges students to explore character movement by focusing on the speed of movements. This exercise is mental and physical — students will brainstorm a list of characters that move fast and a list of characters that move slow. Then, students will get up as a group and act out the different characters ..read more
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