Exploit Your Characters’ Different Perspectives
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Kelley J. P. Lindberg
3d ago
In any given situation, each individual involved in that situation will perceive the exact same things happening in different—sometimes shockingly different—ways. That’s why crime scene witness testimony is often contradictory. The same concept should be true in every scene we write in our stories. No two characters will experience the events within a scene in the exact same way. Are you taking advantage of these differences? Say your character is a young man. If he walks into a bar, what will he notice first? Now turn him into a young woman. What does she notice first? Now picture an old man ..read more
Visit website
Outlining: An Author’s Dilemma
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Ann Gordon
3d ago
I’m still battling with the age-old writers’ conundrum regarding outlining and plotting.  It could be that my resistance to outlining stems from quite a few years working as a tech writer. I’ve written a hundred user manuals for numerous software programs and technical procedures, none of which I could have started or completed without an outline. During these decades, whenever I had time to write some fiction, I described the images, characters, and events occurring in my head. While acting as the steno for my active imagination, I reveled in the freedom of penning short stories wit ..read more
Visit website
Scrap The “Hobby” Thought
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Mark Stevens
1w ago
Here’s actor Jeremy Renner on a recent episode of the Smartless podcast. “I don’t really believe in hobbies. Either you do something or you don’t, right?  I don’t have time to just dip my toe in the water. I’m not taking a ******* bath here in life.” Where do you categorize your writing? If you’re published and regularly publishing, this blog is not for you. If you’re unpublished and working your way into the business, how do you think of your writing? Of your writing time? It takes no effort—and no money—to move it from the “hobby” category to the “priority” category in your mind. To the ..read more
Visit website
In Praise of Thick Books
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Laurie Marr Wasmund
2w ago
One of my college English professors told the story of a British Shakespeare expert who carried a copy of The Riverside Shakespeare onto a plane. The plane was hijacked by a terrorist with a gun. The terrorist shot at the professor, who shielded his chest with the 1,923-page volume of Shakespeare. The bullet lodged in the book, and the professor lived to read another play. While this story is no doubt apocryphal, it appeals to me as a fan of thick books. I worry, though, that budding authors might be hearing another message. I read this paraphrased advice for authors the other day: “Keep the m ..read more
Visit website
How to Use Hybrid Forms to Build Suspense
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Rachel Dempsey
2w ago
In my MFA program, I learned about hybrid forms as a common technique in experimental literary fiction and poetry, but lately I’ve noticed it more often in the genre fiction I read. In his most recent novel, Horror Movie, Paul Tremblay interweaves scenes from a fictional screenplay with traditional prose. Brian McAuley uses the same structure in his 2022 slasher novel, Curse of the Reaper. Julia Fine’s The Upstairs House incorporates sections of the protagonist’s languishing dissertation on famed children’s author, Margaret Wise Brown. And Hidden Pictures by Jason Rekulak includes, you guessed ..read more
Visit website
What Do I Know?
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Rainey Hall
3w ago
“Why should I read your blog about writing?” Says a man to me at Dairy King. He sucks in fresh banana split malt through a straw. I pull my hair behind my ears so I don’t get fried crumbs in the ends. “Well?” Tempted to open my mouth and show him what’s inside, I instead send my fries further down the digestive system. I grab a handful of napkins and spread them on my lap. “Do you know about self-publishing, with which several writers make a three-figure income?” My fellow customer arches his bushy eyebrows, the left one forming a tent top. Are you aware of all the daily stuff a best-selling a ..read more
Visit website
Moving Beyond “Write What You Know”
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Maggie Smith
3w ago
The adage “write what you know” has been a cornerstone of writing advice for decades. It encourages writers to draw from their own experiences, lending authenticity and depth to their work. But this approach can also be limiting. Confining yourself to only what you know can stifle your creativity and lead to repetitive themes and dull prose. Why not explore two alternative approaches and stretch your creative muscles? Write What You Want to Know Curiosity can be a powerful catalyst for creativity. When you write about something you’re eager to know more about, the process of discovery can infu ..read more
Visit website
10 Ways to Handle Rejection Letters
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Kelley J. P. Lindberg
1M ago
Well, drat. You just received a(nother) rejection letter from an agent or editor. You can spend the next 48 hours sulking, watching Netflix, doom-scrolling, or threatening to move to Belize and take up watermelon farming. Or… you could try one of these methods of dealing with rejection instead: Use it as a trigger to immediately send your piece to someone else. If it’s a form rejection, remember that odds are good the editor or agent was too busy to read their queries and they’re just clearing out their inbox. Send your piece to someone else. If it’s a personalized rejection that says it was ..read more
Visit website
Real Writers Top Eight
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Mark Stevens
1M ago
Real Writers Top Six Why AREN’T you attending “One-Day MFA”? Got a good excuse, do you? Fabulous piece by Angela Ackerman here on How To Write Inner Conflict. A tidy compilation of advice from Raymond Carver. Including this gem: “At the risk of appearing foolish, a writer sometimes needs to be able to just stand and gape at this or that thing—a sunset or an old shoe—in absolute and simple amazement.” I’m thrilled to have a short story (“The Cistern”) in the new RMFW anthology, Without Brakes, Fingers Crossed. Now available to order! Congratulations to editors Paul Martz and Linda Ditchkus for ..read more
Visit website
What Readers Say Behind Our Backs (and Sometimes to Our Faces)
Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
by Rachel Dempsey
1M ago
I recently had the privilege of moderating a discussion between a local author and an inaugural book club in Silverthorne. After the two hour dialogue, my author friend and I shared our impressions over a glass of wine. Number one take-away: most readers are not writers and therefore say things we would never say to each other. It got me thinking about how best to handle conversations around my own work. A common mistake amongst fiction readers is conflating writer and main character. If this happens, I might first concede certain similarities as reflections of the lens through which I see the ..read more
Visit website

Follow Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR