The Benefits of Camomile Tea
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Marnie
1M ago
What is Camomile Tea?  Camomile tea is a staple in many households, and for good reason! With its abundance of benefits for babies and adults, camomile is a reliable herbal tea that can be used to minimise discomforts and stress. The famous tea is made from the dried flowers of the chamomile plant (Matricaria chamomilla or Chamaemelum nobile), used to calm the mind and bodily discomfort.    Why Is Camomile Tea Popular? For centuries it has been used as a herbal tea and natural remedy, due to its potential health benefits. To better absorb the calming elements of the flower it ..read more
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Why Are Herbal Teas Preferable?
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Maddy
2y ago
Herbal medicine is the rightful medicine of all human beings. Caring for yourself and your family by using herbs is an empowering experience—it allows you to tap into the power of nature and take responsibility for your health and well-being. Over the last thirty years at the ASOHM we’ve collected many rare, out-of-print books on herbs and their uses, discovering valuable recipes and ancient formulae that may otherwise have been forgotten.  Herbal teas, the most ancient form of herbal medicine, are still popular today as they are  gentle and soothing on the stomach, as well as bein ..read more
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Peppermint: The Ancient Healer
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
2y ago
Peppermint is an aromatic perennial herb, native to Europe and Asia, that is a cross between spearmint and watermint. Its Latin name is Mentha x piperita  which comes from the word “Mintha”, the Greek name of a nymph who was transformed into a mint plant, and “piper” meaning pepper, due to its spicy, pungent flavour.   Used for thousands of years for its pleasant taste, particularly in breath mints and sweets, peppermint is often enjoyed as a refreshing, caffeine-free tea. However, as the leaves contain several essential oils including menthol, menthone and limon ..read more
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Antenatal & Postnatal Remedies
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
2y ago
Further to my previous blog titled SAFE Herbs for Mums & Bubs, the following is a selection of recipes and/or remedies for different issues that may arise, either before or after giving birth. Blood Building  50g  Calendula 50g  Red clover 50g  Stinging nettle Directions: Prepare the herbs as below* and drink three to four cups daily, as required. Also, drink one glass (150ml) of organic beetroot juice every day to build up the red corpuscles in the blood and eat iron-rich foods, such as red meat, liver, dried fruit, fortified cereals and dried beans. Breastfeeding/L ..read more
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Safe Herbs For Mums & Bubs
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
2y ago
Expecting your first baby can be a wonderful but daunting experience, as there is so much information available these days. Foremost, is keeping mum well and delivering a healthy, happy baby which means some lifestyle changes are advisable. There are many things that can be detrimental during this time, alcohol and recreational drugs being among them, but it is also advisable to limit caffeine, as it can interfere with sleep, contribute to nausea and lead to dehydration. With this in mind, the following are safe herbs that may help to facilitate the happy event. CAMOMILE Drinking camomile tea ..read more
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Shepherd’s Purse Tightens Without a String!
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
2y ago
English physician Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654) wrote: “This plant is a remarkable instance of the truth of an observation. Few plants possess greater virtues than this, and yet it is utterly disregarded. It helps all fluxes of blood, either caused by inward or outward wounds. It is also used where there is flux of the belly and bloody flux, and spitting and voiding of the blood. It will stop the terms for women. The juice dropped into the ears, heals the pains, noise and mattering’s thereof.” Shepherd’s purse was carried by migrating Europeans and established itself wherever they settled by ..read more
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Ginseng – Prized Root of the East
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
3y ago
For thousands of years the Chinese have credited ginseng as the “king of the herbs”, believing it to be good for everything from sex problems to terminal diseases! Its botanical name Panax is derived from the Greek word panakos, a panacea, in reference to the miraculous virtue ascribed to it by the Chinese. The History of Ginseng During various periods of Chinese history, ginseng was worth more than gold. Physicians used it only in their very best prescriptions and sometimes an emperor would send a few grams to a distinguished friend who was suffering from a serious ailment that had not respo ..read more
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Ancient & Current Uses Of Knotgrass
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
3y ago
What is knotgrass? In the past, knotgrass has been known as pigweed, swine’s grass, nine-joints, allseed and bird’s tongue. The plant is a member of the Polygonaceae familyand its botanical name is Polyganum aviculare. Knotgrass is generally regarded as a useless weed – it grows in roadsides, ditches, waste lands and meadows, as well as in cultivated soils, world-wide. Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654), an English botanist, herbalist, physician and astrologer, lists the many uses of knotgrass in “Culpeper’s Complete Herbal & English Physician” book, and starts off by saying: “It is generally k ..read more
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The Healing Magic of Club Moss
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
3y ago
Common club moss is found world-wide and grows abundantly in moors and dry, evergreen forests. If the forests are cut down, the plant shrivels up and turns yellow due to the direct sunlight. The four-year-old plants develop yellowish spikes which yield spores called club moss powder. Belonging to the moss family lycopodiaceae, its botanical name is lycopodium clavatum but it is also known as vegetable sulphur, stag’s-horn, wolf’s claw and running ground-pine. The benefits of club moss In herbal medicine, the plant has an important place for its haemostatic, anti-spasmodic and healing propertie ..read more
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How to give up smoking for GOOD!
Australian School of Herbal Medicine Blog
by Hilde Hemmes
3y ago
Breaking the habit of smoking Remember that smoking can kill but it is a preventable cause of death – for you to kick the habit, you personally must reverse the process that hooked you. “The decision has to be made deep inside. Once this decision is made, the biggest part of the battle is over”, says a medical journal. The major element in success will be your own willpower. Herbal Remedy for Giving Up Smoking • 50g Plantain • 50g Thyme Directions: Infuse one heaped teaspoon of the above mixed herbs with one cup of boiling water for 3-5 minutes, strain and drink 3-4 cups daily. Important thin ..read more
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