Top 5 Tips for Finding Birds Nesting Near You
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
1w ago
Mourning Doves on a nest under a building overhang in Arizona. Photo by Michael Sadat / Macaulay Library. Originally published in the Spring 2016 issue of Living Bird; updated and expanded April 2024. Finding a bird’s nest offers a rare chance to discreetly witness the intricacies of breeding bird biology. But birds have spent millions of years evolving ways to hide their nests from onlookers—so it takes skill to find these camouflaged gems. But take heart—if you have birds around your house, and even just a little bit of habitat such as shrubs or trees, birds are probably nesting near you. An ..read more
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What to Do About Predators
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
1w ago
Photo © Robert J. BakerDealing with Predators Although nest boxes provide nesting opportunities for many native birds, they also can make easy targets for predators. Common predators of nests in nest boxes include raccoons, cats, snakes, and squirrels. Here are some tips to help you thwart these common nest box predators. The most passive way to prevent predation is to avoid placing nest boxes in areas where predators are prevalent. But, because some predators are prevalent everywhere, you should consider protecting your nest boxes with predator guards. Recent research using NestWatch data sug ..read more
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Birdword: An Illustrated Guide to Some Tongue-Twisting Ornithological Terms
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
3w ago
Birdword is a recurring feature in Living Bird magazine. Subscribe now. They’re sometimes called technical terms, eight-dollar-words, jargon, or just plain gobbledygook. But hidden inside those multisyllabic ornithological utterances are keys to fascinating behaviors, time machines to take you back to ancient Greek and Latin, and sly insights to the minds of scientists at work. In this recurring feature by illustrator Rosemary Mosco we break down a few of the “birdwords” we enjoy the most. For more, check out our earlier Birdword items written by Living Bird staff writers. Brood Parasite Broo ..read more
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Oberwerk Sport ED 8×42 Binoculars: Our Review
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Hugh Powell
1M ago
At A Glance Oberwerk Sport ED 8×42 binoculars. Image courtesy Oberwerk.PROS: Very good image Good focus wheel movement Generous field of view Good close focus CONS: Metal focus wheel can be slippery Loose eyecups and lens covers Eye relief on the low side STATS: Price: $349.95 MSRP at press time. Prices often fluctuate, so check with retailers Close focus: 6.6 feet (200 cm) Field of view: Reported as 8.1° (425 feet at 1,000 yards). More about field of view  Weight: 26.9 oz (763 g)—that’s about 2.0 oz (57 g) heavier than the average for 8×42 binoculars in our review Eye relief: 15.0 m ..read more
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Providing Nest Material for Birds: Dos & Don’ts
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Hugh Powell
2M ago
Rufous Hummingbird by Penny Hall/Birdshare. Originally published April 2009; updated February 2024. Most birds build some kind of structure to contain their eggs and nestlings. A bird’s nest may be as simple as a nighthawk’s or Killdeer’s depression on the ground, a hole in a tree excavated by a woodpecker, or an elaborate pouchlike nest woven by an oriole. The most familiar nest type is a cup made of vegetation and sometimes mud. Often, the outer layers are of coarse material, and the inside is lined with softer or finer material. Depending on the species, cup-nesters may hide their nests in ..read more
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The Great Backyard Bird Count is February 16–19
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Pat Leonard
2M ago
Global Bird Count in February Join the world in connecting to birds – February 16–19, 2024. Watch the video to learn more about the count. Peregrine Falcon by Marky Mutchler/Macaulay Library Video Transcript Spend time in your favorite places watching birds–then tell us about them! In as little as 15 minutes notice the birds around you. Identify them, count them, and submit them to help scientists better understand and protect birds around the world. If you already use eBird or Merlin, your submissions over the 4 days count towards GBBC. Beyond the Backyard: All About the Great Backyard Bird C ..read more
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An Eye for Beauty: Remembering Tom Johnson
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
3M ago
Most birders dream of seeing one Ross’s Gull at a time. Tom Johnson’s adventurous spirit and impeccable camera skills captured this beautiful photo from Alaska’s North Slope. Photo by Tom Johnson / Macaulay Library. From the Winter 2024 issue of Living Bird magazine. Subscribe now. More From Living Bird Living Bird Winter 2024—Table Of Contents Living Bird Magazine—Latest Issue Living Bird Magazine Archives In July 2023, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology community lost a dear friend and colleague when Tom Johnson passed away unexpectedly at the age of 35. Tom’s extraordinary ski ..read more
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A Third of American Adults Are Birdwatchers, According to Nationwide Survey
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
3M ago
From the Winter 2024 issue of Living Bird magazine. Subscribe now. Photo by Alli Smith. Around 96 million people in the U.S. closely observed, fed, or photographed birds; visited public parks to view birds; or maintained plantings and natural areas around the home for the benefit of birds in 2022. That’s more than 35% of the nation’s population aged 16 and over. The eye-popping figures come from the latest Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The estimated total number of birdwatchers is more than double the figure cite ..read more
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Tinder for Akikiki
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
3M ago
Akikiki by Grigory Heaton / Macaulay Library. From the Winter 2024 issue of Living Bird magazine. Subscribe now. This story was adapted from a post on TWS Wildlife News, published by The Wildlife Society. A study model that’s being called an avian version of the dating app Tinder is showing that giving females a bit of choice between prospective mates can drastically improve the output of a captive breeding program for a critically endangered species of Hawaiian honeycreeper. More From Living Bird Living Bird Winter 2024—Table Of Contents Living Bird Magazine—Latest Issue Li ..read more
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Endangered Willow Flycatchers in San Diego Are Adapting to Climate Change
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology - All About Birds
by Victoria Campbell
3M ago
Willow Flycatcher by Sam Zhang / Macaulay Library. From the Winter 2024 issue of Living Bird magazine. Subscribe now. Recent research has uncovered an endangered Willow Flycatcher population’s ability to undergo genetic change in order to adapt to climate change. More From Living Bird Living Bird Winter 2024—Table Of Contents Living Bird Magazine—Latest Issue Living Bird Magazine Archives In a study published in the journal Nature Climate Change last June, researchers documented a genome-wide shift within a population of Willow Flycatchers in San Diego, which scientists think ..read more
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