Audubon insta a los líderes mundiales a tomar medidas inmediatas para combatir la crisis climática y de biodiversidad
Audubon
by National Audubon Society
12h ago
WASHINGTON (7 de noviembre de 2022) -- Mientras el mundo se reúne en Sharm El-Sheikh, Egipto, para la última Conferencia de las Partes de la CMNUCC (COP27), la National Audubon Society, la principal organización de conservación de aves de las Américas, insta a los líderes del mundo a tomar medidas contra la crisis climática. Cada año, la necesidad de una acción global colaborativa no solo se vuelve más evidente, sino más apremiante. “En la COP de este año, los líderes mundiales deben trabajar juntos para implementar una transición energética justa para proteger tanto a la vida silvestre como ..read more
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An Ode to Weird Duck Time
Audubon
by Rosemary Mosco
12h ago
As a birder living in the Northeast, I love to watch the seasons change because each one brings its own joys. In the spring I look for migratory songbirds in their dazzlingly fresh breeding plumages. During the summer I spend lazy days watching herons fish and hummingbirds zip between flowers. Fall is a time for sipping tea from a steamy thermos as southbound hawks stream by. And then there’s winter—and winter is special. Winter is Weird Duck Time. Many duck species nest at high latitudes, raising their young in boreal forest wetlands or on the Arctic tundra. But soon the abundance of t ..read more
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Birdist Rule #71: Figure Out What Kind Of Chickadees You’ve Got
Audubon
by Nicholas Lund
1d ago
I’ve probably said this about every bird at one time or another, but this time I mean it: Chickadees are the best birds. They’re just the best. They’re cute. They’re cool-looking. They make a lot of noise to let you know they’re coming. No one has ever been disappointed to see a chickadee. But how much do you really know about the chickadee you see in your woods or at your feeder? Do you know, say, which of the seven chickadee species found in the United States it happens to be? You don’t?! Do you realize how much cooler you’d be if you DID know? Maybe cool enough to finally make some headwa ..read more
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Cattle ranching for birds: a song for sustainability
Audubon
by Audubon Americas
6d ago
This Fall, Audubon Americas launched the Sustainable Cattle Ranching Playbook, an illustrative publication for producers to showcase how cattle ranching can boost productivity while helping birds.  The playbook shares best practices and information that, although showcased in Colombia, can be used in almost any farm in Latin America and the Caribbean, regions where the transition to sustainable cattle ranching practices is urgently needed to stop deforestation, land exhaustion, and overall environmental degradation.  Cattle ranching for birds: a song for sustainability inv ..read more
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Top Audubon Successes of 2022
Audubon
by National Audubon Society
6d ago
Throughout 2022, Audubon continued its rich tradition of advocating for and securing the space, clean air, and clean water that birds and people need to live and thrive. This past year, Audubon and the Audubon Action Fund helped more than 150,000 people make their voices heard, fighting for stronger climate actions in the Inflation Reduction Act, for Lights Out and Native Plant proclamations in cities across the country, for coastal community protections and natural infrastructure that also supports bird colonies, and for better water policies across the West. Audubon staff, chapters, and pa ..read more
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The Colorado River Compact at 100
Audubon
by Jennifer Pitt
1w ago
On November 24, 1922, representatives of the seven Colorado River basin states—Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming—gathered in Santa Fe, N.M., to sign the Colorado River Compact, cementing into law a regime for dividing the river’s water. Without exception, these men were newcomers to a region inhabited since time immemorial by Native American Tribes. Two of them represented states just a decade old, none represented states more than 75-years-old, and their purpose was to enable colonial settlers to establish a foothold through irrigation-driven economic deve ..read more
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Hooded Oriole and Lawrence's Goldfinch by Christian Penn
Audubon
by National Audubon Society
1w ago
Painted: 10/28/2018 Sponsored by: George Olive & Ingrid Nordgard About the Birds: A classic California combo, the Hooded Oriole and Lawrence’s Goldfinch face very different futures in a warming climate. The oriole thrives in hot weather and often nests in palm trees, and its overall territory is likely to expand. Lawrence’s Goldfinch, by contrast, is a finicky nomad that requires certain native plants and a reliable supply of fresh water. Audubon projects the goldfinch will lose much of its breeding range as temperatures rise. About the Artist:  His roots in the graff ..read more
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Five Fantastic New Birdy and Nature-Themed Books for Kids
Audubon
by The Editors
1w ago
Nature is the ultimate entertainer, providing endless opportunities to explore, observe, and make connections—between species and habitats, and among humans. These five books will delight children of various ages, and maybe even inspire them to take action.  Love Birds By Jane Yolen/Illustrated by Anna Wilson (Cameron Kids, 2022; 32 pages; ages 4 to 8) Jon is a quiet, solitary boy who seeks out the company of birds, always listening for the calls and songs of cardinals and wrens, jays and chickadees, that bring happiness to his life. One evening he he ..read more
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Six Books for Bird Nerds and Nature Lovers
Audubon
by The Editors
1w ago
Conversations with Birds By Priyanka Kumar (Milkweed Editions; 296 pages; $26) In 20 vignettes and essays, Priyanka Kumar lovingly narrates how encounters with birds have molded her outlook on life, family, and nature, bridging the mountains of her childhood in India to her adult wanderings in California and New Mexico. A spark was Kumar’s chance “mango-colored bird” sighting—a Western Tanager—that stirs her to “aliveness” during a near-death experience; her powerful musings take off from there. Her writing is full of beauty but also tells of destruction of the interconnected ecosystem ..read more
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Let's Talk Turkey Beards
Audubon
by Jenny McKee
1w ago
Wild Turkeys are spectacular birds, coming in an array of colors and sporting a variety of eye-popping appendages. The wattle—the colorful flap of bare skin hanging from a turkey’s head—may be the most familiar feature to folks. Both it and the fleshy growth on a male’s forehead and bill, called a snood, turn brilliant hues of pink, red, white, and blue when males display during the breeding season. But in addition to all that flashy flesh, there’s another curious trait that turkeys tout: their beards. Turkey beards are plumes of dark brown or black feathers—more hair-like than a typical fea ..read more
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