Feds Run Away From Impact Assessment — and Environmental Protection
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
1d ago
As with the Monty Python knights fleeing the ferocious bunny, “Run away! Run away!” appears to be the federal legislative response to the Supreme Court of Canada’s October 2023 opinion on the constitutionality of the Impact Assessment Act (IAA).  The proposed government bill to revise the IAA would severely undercut existing federal authority to assess impacts of proposed oil sands projects, dams, or marine terminals that cause serious transboundary environmental effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, reduced water flows in international and interprovincial rivers, or destruction of ..read more
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Canada Continues to Underestimate Emissions from Logging in Latest GHG Inventory, Ignoring Calls from Policymakers, Scientists, and Civil Society
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
2w ago
In its 2024 National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, released yesterday, Canada has continued its longstanding practice of downplaying the logging industry’s role in driving the climate crisis. Amid a growing chorus of scientists, policymakers, and civil society organizations calling for Canada to transparently report emissions from logging, the federal government has instead clung to its controversial accounting practices that, due to unbalanced methodologies, erase a significant proportion of the sector’s emissions from the ledger books. Earlier this year, a peer-reviewed paper found that, betwee ..read more
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Our Orange Crush: A Baltimore Oriole Love Story
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
3w ago
Thank you to our Nature Network partner Bird Friendly Hamilton Burlington for sharing this month’s blog. It’s hard not to become smitten with the beautiful Baltimore Oriole that graces us with its presence each spring and summer across most of southern Canada. The striking, brilliant orange plumage of the males, and yellow-orange plumage of the females, isn’t something we’re used to seeing in the birds of Canada—like something out of the tropics! But then again, given that they spend the remaining seven months of the year in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America, can they not also ..read more
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Barbara’s Story
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
3w ago
Georgian Bay is my idea of heaven—I loved being in the canoe, peacefully slipping through the water alongside mergansers and loons. I vividly recall once on a calm, lovely day I had my binoculars, camera, and field guides, and I set out in the canoe. A little family of loons swam right up close, and we journeyed together for a bit along the water. I didn’t take a picture or note it down, I just enjoyed it. Even to this day, I can go back to that moment. I can hear my paddle in the water, I can hear the wind in the pines and smell their needles as the breeze brushes my face… Being in nat ..read more
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Nature Canada’s Partners Are Meeting With Over 60 MPs and Ministers’ Offices in Annual “Nature on the Hill” Event in Ottawa
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
3w ago
Unceded Algonquin Territory — Ottawa, ON (April 29, 2024) — Nature Canada’s annual Nature on the Hill event is connecting nature groups from across Canada with Members of Parliament and senior ministers to push for whole-of-government support for a National Biodiversity Strategy and a Nature Accountability Act that will give the country the tools and resources to meet the government’s ambitious biodiversity targets. Dozens of meetings, both virtual and in-person, are lined up.  Meetings include MPs from all of the parties in parliament as well as high-level meetings with the following Mi ..read more
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The Small but Mighty American Kestrel — Recovery, Rehabilitation & Research
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
1M ago
Photo Credit: Ann Brokelman Their plentiful populations are indicators of ecosystem health, but they face numerous threats in urban and rural areas. This ranges from vehicle strikes and collisions with reflective glass windows (a common risk along their migratory paths), to pesticide exposure and habitat loss. Kestrels have adapted well to surviving with the increase of human infrastructure, but some can end up sick, injured or orphaned because of the urban challenges they face. When that happens, Toronto Wildlife Centre (TWC) can help. The registered charity has dedicated the last 31 years ..read more
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The Aptly Named Wood Duck
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
1M ago
You’ll Know if You’ve Seen a Wood Duck! These are distinct, stunning ducks! The male is a patchwork quilt made up of an iridescent green and chestnut-brown head with a red eye, bright red and yellow on the beak, white-spotted brown chest, delicately patterned buffy belly, blue accents on the wings and bold white markings delineating each area. The female has lovely blue feathers accenting her wings – a “speculum” patch – providing contrast to her primary grey/brown colour, and a lovely white teardrop around the eye complemented by a striking yellow eye-ring. Environment for the America’s has ..read more
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Every Bird Rescued and Rehabilitated is a Victory for Its Species
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
1M ago
Cliff Swallows are social birds that forage and migrate in flocks, consisting of hundreds of cooperative individuals. They also construct their nests side-by-side in colonies that can have thousands of active nests at a time. Observing a colony of nesting Cliff Swallows, from a respectful distance, as hundreds of parents fly back and forth to feed their hungry young is truly a fascinating experience. You might be surprised to know that you could be driving past one of these colonies on your way to work without even realizing it! Cliff Swallows are skilled masons who build gourd-shaped nests ..read more
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Nature Network Showcase: Raincoast Conservation Foundation — Advocating for Wild Salmon and Killer Whale Conservation Measures
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
1M ago
Raincoast Conservation Foundation (Raincoast) is a team of conservationists and scientists empowered by research to protect the lands, waters, and wildlife of coastal British Columbia. We use rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement to further our conservation objectives. We call this approach informed advocacy. As a charitable, non-profit conservation science organization that operates a research lab at the University of Victoria, a land trust, a conservation genetics lab, and a research/sailing vessel, we are unique in Canada. Our organizational mandate is Investigate. Infor ..read more
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Nature Network Showcase: Coastal Action — Working for Nature in Nova Scotia
Nature Canada Blog
by Nature Canada
1M ago
My name is Taylor Wilson, and I am the Species at Risk and Biodiversity Team Lead at Coastal Action located in Nova Scotia, Canada. Coastal Action, established in December 1993, is a charitable, research-based organization that addresses environmental concerns in Atlantic Canada, mainly within the Kespukwitk (South Shore) region of Nova Scotia. Our goal is to promote the restoration, enhancement, and conservation of our environment through research, education, action, and community engagement for future generations. Coastal Action is currently tackling many environmental issues that fall unde ..read more
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