Is the “NZYQ” verdict a new guiding principle against the indefinite detention of illegal immigrants?
LSE Human Rights
by Wain1,L
1w ago
Following the High Court of Australia’s landmark ruling against indefinite detention of illegal migrants, reversing its 2004 decision, Shaharyaar Shahardar explores the vital role the judiciary must play in scrutinising immigration laws globally, ensuring adherence to human rights despite populist pressures. On 9 November 2023, the High Court of Australia delivered a landmark judgement ruling against the indefinite detention of illegal migrants, some of whom have remained in prison for years. The decision overturned an earlier verdict passed in 2004 which justified the indefinite detention as ..read more
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Silence is violence: If Canada defends human rights, what about Palestine?
LSE Human Rights
by Maddie Giles
2w ago
Ameera Es-Sabar discusses the concept of silent violence in the context of Canada, drawing parallels between Canada’s exclusionary approaches towards its Indigenous inhabitants and its (lack of) response to ongoing events in Palestine and Israel. By highlighting similarities in Canada’s approaches towards Indigenous peoples both at home and abroad, and its contrasting responses to events in Ukraine and Palestine, she exposes Canada’s silent violence and complicity in national and international state violence.  “Defending human rights and democracy has always been, and will continue t ..read more
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Eradicating manual scavenging: a step toward upholding human rights and social justice
LSE Human Rights
by Wain1,L
1M ago
The practice of manual scavenging is a violation of human rights that needs to be addressed in health and sanitation policy reform. Caste-based discrimination and lack of technological innovation is at the root of the issue. Arunbalaji Selvaraj, explores how law enforcement, economic empowerment, increasing awareness and upgrading sanitary infrastructure are essential to upholding human rights. Manual scavenging, a practice distinct and far more perilous than regular janitorial work, involves the hazardous and inhumane task of manually handling human waste from dry latrines and sewers. Still s ..read more
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Protecting the Rights of Older People: One of the Most Neglected Human Rights in the World
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
4M ago
Globally, the demographic shift is changing at a faster rate. According to the World Health Organization, the number of people aged 60 or older is expected to rise to 2.1 billion in 2050. As life expectancy increases and fertility declines, the population structure in many countries has shifted to an inverted population pyramid. Despite the global demographic trend, many countries are not fully ready to confront this aging phenomenon. Due to the lack of governmental effort in building age-friendly environments and infrastructures, older adults are negatively influenced in both direct and indir ..read more
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Inequalities in Access to Healthcare Among Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Communities: “It’s Like We Don’t Exist”
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
5M ago
Religious, cultural and linguistic minorities have long faced discrimination in relation to their distinctive identity. Although a great variety of minority situations exist, Gypsies[1], Roma, and Travellers (hereafter termed using the acronym “GRT”) can be described as an ‘invisible’ ethnic minority group in the United Kingdom in terms of academic and policy-making discourse, often unseen and unheard, isolated, and lacking impartial evaluation. Of course, the issue of ‘visibility’ is ironic (Clark, 2001). The invisibility of GRT communities in an academic and policy space contrasts with their ..read more
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Uganda’s draconian Anti-Homosexuality legislation and Africa’s anti-LGBTQ attitude
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
5M ago
On May 29, President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda signed one of the world’s stringent anti-LGBTQ legislations, that restricts LGBTQ rights and introduces harsher penalties for certain types of homosexual acts. While the new legislation enjoys support from a significant portion of the population in this East African nation, it has faced widespread condemnation from rights activists and others abroad. The Act enforces a punishment of life imprisonment for engaging in consensual same-sex acts, and the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality”. According to the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual ..read more
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Kashmir Graves and their Codes of Silence
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
5M ago
Introduction In 2009 the International People’s Tribunal on Human Rights and Justice in Kashmir released a report entitled ‘Buried Evidence: Unknown, Unmarked and Mass Graves in Indian-Administered Kashmir’. The report documented the existence of 2700 ‘unknown, unmarked, mass graves’ containing over 2900 bodies in three districts across 55 villages in the part of the Kashmir region administered by India. 87.9 % of the bodies discovered could not be identified. In 2017, the State Human Rights Commission of Kashmir called for a detailed investigation to be completed within 6 months. Almost six y ..read more
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Biometrics and International Aid: Time to Democratise Digitalisation
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
5M ago
Digitalisation, which involves ‘leveraging digitisation to improve business processes’ has permeated a plethora of sectors. Humanitarian aid is no exception. One such subset of digitalisation is biometric verification: a technological means used to identify a person based on their biological features, including but not limited to ‘fingerprints, hand and earlobe geometries, retina patterns, voice prints and written signatures’. The United Nations’ (UN) and, in particular, the UN Refugee Agency’s (UNHCR) drive to embrace biometrics is perhaps unsurprising. This is in light of the UNHCR’s commitm ..read more
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Basic Needs Approach And Missing Refugee Label: Strengthening The Refugee Regime For Environmental Refugees In India
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
6M ago
International law guarantees certain inherent rights which cannot be violated by states. It imposes an obligation on states with regards to economic, social, and cultural rights that can be achieved through international cooperation and assistance. Such extraterritorial obligations on states are necessary for the protection of fundamental rights of refugees. However, as India is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention, it is only bound by the rules of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation. Further, there is no formal refugee policy in India. These can be considered a majo ..read more
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Analyzing the Environmental and Food Security Extraterritorial Obligations in the Russia-Ukraine Conflict from a TWAIL-centric Perspective
LSE Human Rights
by Rahman2,Y
6M ago
The Russian invasion of Ukraine has had a devastating impact on the environment and global food market, particularly in Third World nations (also referred to as the Global South). Several instances of explosions in nuclear facilities, oil refineries and distribution pipelines have greatly contributed to the indiscriminate destruction of crops, agricultural land, and vital infrastructure in the region. Inevitably, such destruction has had an immediate impact on the people’s access to food supply in the North African and Middle Eastern countries that are dependent on the region for the same, lea ..read more
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