Home Assistant Display Uses E-Ink
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Al Williams
1M ago
[Markus] grabbed an ESP32 and created a good-looking e-ink dashboard that can act as a status display for Home Automation. However, the hardware is generic enough that it could work as a weather station or even a task scheduler. The project makes good use of modules, so there isn’t much to build. A Waveshare 2.9-inch e-ink panel and an ESP32, along with a power supply, are all you need. The real work is in the software. Of course, you also need a box to put it in, but with 3D printing, that’s hardly a problem. Well, it isn’t a problem unless — like [Markus] — you don’t have a 3D printer. Inst ..read more
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2024 Home Sweet Home Automation: The Winners Are In
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Tom Nardi
1M ago
Home automation is huge right now in consumer electronics, but despite the wide availability of products on the market, hackers and makers are still spinning up their own solutions. It could be because their situations are unique enough that commercial offerings wouldn’t cut it, or perhaps they know how cheaply many automation tasks can be implemented with today’s microcontrollers. Still others go the DIY route because they’re worried about the privacy implications of pushing such a system into the cloud. Seeing how many of you were out there brewing bespoke automation setups gave us the idea ..read more
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Combadge Project Wants to Bring Trek Tech to Life
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Tom Nardi
1M ago
While there’s still something undeniably cool about the flip-open communicators used in the original Star Trek, the fact is, they don’t really look all that futuristic compared to modern mobile phones. But the upgraded “combadges” used in Star Trek: The Next Generation and its various large and small screen spin-offs — now that’s a tech we’re still trying to catch up to. As it turns out, it might not be as far away as we thought. A company called Vocera actually put out a few models of WiFi “Communication Badges” in the early 2000s that were intended for hospital use, which these days can be ..read more
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A Smart Power Distribution Unit for Home Automation
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Bryan Cockfield
1M ago
Power distribution units, as the name implies, are indispensable tools to have available in a server rack. They can handle a huge amount of power for demands of intensive computing and do it in a way that the wiring is managed fairly well. Plenty of off-the-shelf solutions have remote control or automation capabilities as well, but finding none that fit [fmarzocca]’s needs or price range, he ended up building his own essentially from scratch that powers his home automation system. Because it is the power supply for a home automation system, each of the twelve outlets in this unit needed to be ..read more
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Garage Door Automation With No Extra Hardware
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Bryan Cockfield
2M ago
Home automation projects have been popular as long as microcontrollers have been available to the general public. Building computers to handle minutiae so we don’t have to is one of life’s great joys. Among the more popular is adding some sort of system to a garage door. Besides adding Internet-connected remote control to the action of opening and closing, it’s also helpful to have an indicator of the garage door state for peace-of-mind. Most add some sensors and other hardware to accomplish this task but this project doesn’t use any extra sensors or wiring at all. In fact, the only thing add ..read more
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Baseboard Heaters Get Automated
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Bryan Cockfield
2M ago
If you’re lucky enough to have central heating and/or air conditioning, with an automatic thermostat, you probably don’t have to worry too much about the outside temperature. But central HVAC is far from the only way of maintaining temperature in a home. From wood stoves to boilers there are many options depending on your climate and home type, and [Murphy’s Law] has a decentralized baseboard system instead of something centralized. An ESP8266 solution was found that was able to tie them all together. There are other types of baseboard heaters, but in [Murphy’s Law]’s case the heaters were el ..read more
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A Giga-Sunset For Gigaset IoT Devices
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Arya Voronova
2M ago
In today’s “predictable things that happened before and definitely will happen again”, we have another company in the “smart device” business that has just shuttered their servers, leaving devices completely inert. This time, it’s Gigaset. The servers were shuttered on the 29th of March, and the official announcement (German, Google Translate) states that there’s no easy way out. It appears that the devices were locked into Gigaset Cloud to perform their function, with no local-only option. This leaves all open source integrations in the dust, whatever documentation there was, is now tak ..read more
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Retrogadgets: Butler in a Box
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Al Williams
2M ago
You walk into your house and issue a voice command to bring up the lights and start a cup of coffee. No big deal, right? Siri, Google, and Alexa can do all that. Did we mention it is 1985? And, apparently, you were one of the people who put out about $1,500 for a Mastervoice “Butler in a Box,” the subject of a Popular Science video you can see below. If you think the box is interesting, the inventor’s story is even stranger. [Kevin] got a mint-condition Butler in a Box from eBay. How did it work, given in 1983, there was no AI voice recognition and public Internet? We did note that the “appli ..read more
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2024 Home Sweet Home Automation: A DIY SCADA smart home
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Dave Rowntree
3M ago
Touch-screen control and monitoring Supervisory control and data acquisition, or SCADA, systems sit in the background in industrial settings, performing all kinds of important jobs but in an ad-hoc setup, depending on the precise requirements of the installation. When we think about home automation systems, they’re pretty much the same deal: ad-hoc systems put together from off-the-shelf components and a few custom bits thrown in. [Stefan Schnitzer] clearly has significant knowledge of SCADA in an industrial setting and has carried this over into their home for their entry into the Hackaday 2 ..read more
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Our Home Automation Contest Starts Now!
Hackaday - Home Automation
by Elliot Williams
4M ago
Your home is your castle, and what’s better than a fully automatic castle? Nothing! That’s why we’re inviting you to submit your sweetest home automation hacks for a chance to win one of three $150 DigiKey gift certificates. The contest starts now and runs until April 16th. [Matej]’s Home Buttons gets the job done in open-source style.We love to play around with home automation setups and have seen our fair share, ranging from the simple “turn some lights on” to full-blown cyber-brains that learn your habits and adapt to them. Where is your project on this continuum? Whether you’re focused on ..read more
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