I’m about to have a mastectomy and need some skincare advice
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Anita Bhagwandas
2d ago
Got a beauty dilemma? Our expert is here to help. This week, Sarah is looking beyond cancer surgery First of all, sending lots of love during what can’t be an easy time. Your surgical team will tell you what to do straight after the operation. “It’s important to follow their instructions,” says breast surgeon Chloe Constantinou. “After surgery, the dressings will be taken off if everything has healed, and you’ll be given advice on caring for the skin.” If you’re worried, speak to your team, but generally speaking it’s best to use a gentle cleanser that’s fragrance-free ..read more
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Scientists make potential breast cancer breakthrough after preserving tissue in gel
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Matthew Weaver
5d ago
Ability to preserve tissue in a special gel solution for at least a week will help doctors identify most effective drug treatments Scientists say they have a made a potentially “gamechanging” breakthrough in breast cancer research after discovering how to preserve breast tissue outside the body for at least a week. The study, which was funded by the Prevent Breast Cancer charity, found tissue could be preserved in a special gel solution, which will help scientists identify the most effective drug treatments for patients ..read more
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‘Breasts are a serious political problem’: one woman’s quest to reclaim her chest
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Emine Saner
1w ago
Sarah Thornton had dismissed them as ‘dumb boobs’ until a double mastectomy changed everything. Her new book, Tits Up, explores what our beliefs about breasts mean – from feeding babies to bra design and Baywatch Throughout her life, Sarah Thornton hadn’t given much thought to her breasts. They were there, of course, and they’d fed two children. But they had also attracted unwanted attention, and latterly they’d become a source of concern – with a history of breast cancer in her family, and after years of vigilance and tests, in 2018 Thornton was about to undergo a preventive double mastectomy ..read more
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What if HRT isn’t right for me? And is cold-water swimming really the answer to everything? Your menopause questions answered
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Interviews by Suzy Walker
1w ago
We asked the experts for advice on how to ease your path through menopause and what alternative treatments work best A: Prof Aimee Spector is professor of clinical psychology of ageing at UCL Most studies of menopause symptom management focus on hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and physiological symptoms. This restricts treatment options for women who are concerned about the risks of HRT and overlooks the wellbeing of women with non-physiological symptoms, such as brain fog and mood problems, which are highly prevalent. We have just published in the Journal of Affective Disorders the most up ..read more
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Pills or patches, sprays or gels … everything you need to know about HRT
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Nicola Davis
1w ago
Is hormone replacement therapy right for you and, if it is, what type should you take? All your key questions answered When it comes to menopause, awareness of symptoms and ways to mitigate their impact are changing. Chief among treatments that have undergone an image change is hormone replacement therapy (HRT). While many women have been wary of such medication because of concerns over an increase in the risk of breast cancer, it has recently become a focal point for high-profile campaigners such as Davina McCall, who have stressed its benefits for managing symptoms from low mood to hot flush ..read more
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Kris Hallenga obituary
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Zoe Williams
2w ago
Campaigner who founded the CoppaFeel! cancer awareness charity to encourage women to check their breasts When Kris Hallenga, the founder of the CoppaFeel! breast cancer awareness charity, was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer, she was 23. Things had initially moved very slowly, as doctors were sure that her symptoms were harmless consequences of the pill and hormonal changes; then, once cancer was suspected, very fast, as they raced to discover its extent. Almost immediately, though, they found out that there was secondary cancer in her spine, and everything ground to a halt. The questio ..read more
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Tell us: how have you been affected by the CoppaFeel! breast cancer awareness campaign?
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Guardian community team
2w ago
We would like to hear from young women who benefited from the campaign and spotted the early signs of breast cancer The founder of the charity CoppaFeel!, Kris Hallenga, which raises awareness of checking for early signs of breast cancer in young women, has died aged 38. She was 23 when she was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer and started the charity to encourage young women to check their breasts ..read more
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Deprivation linked to higher second cancer risk among England breast cancer survivors
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Anna Bawden Health and social affairs correspondent
1M ago
Cambridge study finds those from poorest areas have 35% higher risk of second non-breast cancer Female survivors of breast cancer living in the most deprived areas have a 35% higher risk of developing second, unrelated cancers, compared with those from the most affluent areas, research shows. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK, with about 56,000 people being told they have it each year. Improved diagnosis and treatments mean that five-year survival rates are now 86% in England ..read more
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Lower-income US women more likely to miss key breast cancer test, study finds
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Jessica Glenza in New York
1M ago
Isolation and lack of health insurance also correlate to reduced mammogram rates for breast cancer Women who are low-income, socially isolated and lack health insurance are far less likely to be up-to-date on mammograms, a breast cancer screening tool experts said is critical to reducing breast cancer deaths, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer to afflict American women, and kills an estimated 40,000 Americans each year. Cancer overall kills 605,000 Americans a year and is the second-leadin ..read more
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Medics design AI tool to predict side-effects in breast cancer patients
The Guardian | Breast cancer
by Andrew Gregory Health editor
2M ago
Trials in UK, France and the Netherlands indicate tool can predict if patient will experience problems from surgery and radiotherapy Doctors have developed an artificial intelligence tool that can predict which breast cancer patients are more at risk of side-effects after treatment. Worldwide, 2 million women are diagnosed every year with the disease, which is the most common cancer in females in most countries ..read more
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