Emerald Sea [Post 3]: Ports and Anchorages from San Francisco to San Diego
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by RWeibleTWS
2w ago
by Jeffrey Hare, Instructor and Owner of Emerald Sea This 3rd post in our series will cover a topic of keen interest to sailors; Places to stop and what to see and do between San Francisco and San Diego (will cover Mexican ports in future entries). There are plenty of weather applications and advice out there, so I will cover only what we observed when traveling south in late November of 2023, and again North in June of 2024. With the proper ASA skills learned prior to venturing out to these ports of call these destinations will be a great adventure! You should have taken ASA 106 at least and ..read more
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2023 Cruising: Departure Planning
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by RWeibleTWS
1M ago
Written by Jeff Hare, Tradewinds Instructor and Emerald Sea Owner Living in the Bay Area we take the Golden Gate Bridge for granted. We casually (and perhaps automatically) glance up at it during our daily commute and it’s presence gives us reassurance, confidence, sense of community, and even a feeling of contentment – this monument is recognized the world over and is uniquely ours. It serves as a convenient container that that we, mostly, stay on the east side of and rarely, if ever, venture beyond. This bridge is truly a portal through which we have access to the world. Going under it excit ..read more
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Emerald Sea Returns to Marina Bay!
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by RWeibleTWS
1M ago
For those of you who didn’t know, the Catamaran you’ve either taken or hope to take 114 on, belongs to members Becky and Jeff Hare, who just returned from a long cruise down the west coast. Leaving San Francisco Bay on November 20, 2023, aboard their Lagoon 450, they just returned on Saturday, June 8! Over those seven months, they explored over 3,000 miles of coastline to Marina Chiapas in southern Mexico.  Jeff said, “It was amazing to be recognized when wearing our TWSC hats by fellow members all along the coast!  TWSC Students have crossed oceans, cruised incredible waters, and c ..read more
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Nautical Terminator – Corinthian (Part 1)
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by Tony Johnson
1M ago
In sailing, the word “Corinthian” refers to the non-professional arm of the sport. Sailors compete for the love of it, not for any monetary reward. At some levels of racing, this distinction is strictly enforced according to rules of the International Sailing Federation.           But in the nineteenth century, sailboat racing operated like horseracing today. The actual sailing was left to professionals, while owners ashore wagered over gin and tonics. Part of this was based on the complexity of the boats and the skill and physical strength required ..read more
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How to Troll your crew
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by RWeibleTWS
2M ago
(As with all Trolling, the author chooses to remain anonymous) Many Bay Area residents have heard about the Bay Bridge Troll. You may have even been asked about it by fellow crew, and how to see it. Like all Trolls it lives under the bridge, and like other Trolls is hard to find. I have failed to find a clear guide on how to find the Troll, so this is my attempt to help fellow Tradewinds members Troll their crew. The first step is to take all the classes up to and including BBC (ASA 104) so you are allowed to this part of the Bay on a Tradewinds boat, or find a skipper who has taken BBC and is ..read more
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Nautical Terminator – Opening Day
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by Tony Johnson
3M ago
Baseball and fishing have opening days for the season, but what opens? A gate? A bottle? In the case of sailing on San Francisco Bay there was once something that actually did open on opening day.           In many parts of the country, the climate dictates that boats be taken out of the water for winter, so it’s natural for there to be some sort of celebration when they are recommissioned in the spring. Despite our more temperate climate, the custom was brought here and observed at scattered locations where boats were kept in the 19th century. &nbs ..read more
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Nautical Terminator – Pronunciation (Part 2)
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by Tony Johnson
3M ago
Last time we spoke of the odd pronunciations of some sailing terms. Today we will delve into some less certain ones.           Saloon: Some folks use “salon” when referring to the dining and lounging area belowdecks. Well, do you go there to get your hair washed, cut, colored, teased, combed, and blow-dried, while urbanely discussing Proust? OK, me too. But wouldn’t you rather have a tall drink with Kitty and Doc at the Long Branch? “Salon” is common among power boaters, although John Rogers, in Origins of Sea Terms, considers it a lubberly corrupti ..read more
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Nautical Terminator – Pronunciation (Part 1)
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by Tony Johnson
3M ago
I once heard Bugs Bunny derisively call someone a “maroon.” Bugs didn’t know how to pronounce “moron,” thereby proving he was one. Tradewinds’ BKB class introduces the word “bowline,” which is not pronounced like it looks. The “bow” should sound like the “Bo” in Little Bo Peep, and the “line” like the last name of the country singer named Loretta. Taking this class many years ago I thought, Oh, great. As if learning the words isn’t bad enough, you have to learn a whole new way of pronouncing things. Luckily, the list of odd pronunciations isn’t as long as it used to be. We don’t have to know h ..read more
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Women Who’ve Been Around
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by Tony Johnson
4M ago
This month is women’s history month, and as if to put an exclamation point on that, on March 7, 29-year-old, 5’2” 100-pound Cole Brauer claimed her permanent place in the history of sailing when she sailed her First Light across the finish line of the Global Solo Challenge in A Coruña, Spain, placing her second among 16 starters in the race. More than half of those starters, all seasoned seamen older and bigger than her, had retired. This completed a 30,000-mile, 130-day non-stop solo circumnavigation passing the great capes, and it’s a little hard to get a reliable figure, but I think this ma ..read more
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Nautical Terminator – King Tides
Tradewinds Sailing Blog
by Tony Johnson
4M ago
In this world of few certainties, there is one thing that I am certain of: I am not certain how the tides work. Oh, it’s the moon’s gravity, and I think the sun is involved. Well, then, how is it that on a new moon, when the sun and the moon are both on the same side of the earth, we still have two tides? Shouldn’t there be just one big one?             I was reminded of these puzzles recently because of what the news media were calling “King Tides.” This isn’t official terminology from NOAA; it’s used to sensationalize the highest tides ..read more
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