How different yacht types change sailing characteristics
Yachting Monthly
by Ken Endean
6d ago
Ken Endean looks back on the boats he has owned over 50 years and explains why the hull lines of older yachts continue to offer first-class handling Most of Britain’s yacht owners, both now and in the future, will be sailing boats built in the 1960s to 1980s, that are highly durable, structurally sound and capable of being restored and maintained to a high standard at a fraction of the cost of buying a new boat. And because there is a wide choice, potential buyers can take their time to choose a design that handles well – a quality greatly influenced by the hull shape. Amongst older craft, hu ..read more
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How to rig a yacht’s mooring lines to avoid chafe
Yachting Monthly
by James Stevens
1w ago
James Stevens considers a problem sent in by a Yachting Monthly reader who asks how to rig a yacht's mooring lines to avoid chafe Jenny and Ted are cruising with their two teenage children on board their 10m yacht Oyster Catcher. Forecasters have been warning of wet and windy weather for the next few days. The forecast is for gale-force winds and rain arriving in the evening and continuing through the following day. The wind will freshen from the south then veer to the west as low pressure passes to the north on its way eastwards. It is clearly a forecast for yachts to be moored in a safe har ..read more
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A beginners guide to easy yacht navigation
Yachting Monthly
by Toby Heppell
2w ago
Sometimes, rather than knowing where you are, it’s easier to know where you aren’t, says Justin Morton in his guide to yacht navigation When you first start to learn about yacht navigation it can seem complex and pretty nuanced, but in reality what you are doing falls into two overarching styles. The first style of navigation is to know exactly where you are all the time, so you can manoeuvre to get to where you want to go and stay safe whilst you do it. This is the way commercial shipping, Naval warships, satnavs and, increasingly, your chartplotter, navigate. It’s therefore natural to want ..read more
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‘Dodging ships can feel like being a chicken crossing a very busy motorway’
Yachting Monthly
by Yachting Monthly
2w ago
It seemed odd when container vessels mysteriously started keeping clear of Peter Webb’s yacht, but the AIS-related answer only appeared in harbour. Crossing the North Sea in a small boat usually involves a lot of dodging large shipping, but this passage was mysteriously different Photo: Peter Webb The North Sea at night: I love it. It can turn wild, like any mountain or desert, but that’s not all the time. When it’s calm, fishing lights appear, dodge about, and disappear. Wind farm constructions march through the waves, towering above small boats, flashing red and white in the moonlight. The b ..read more
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Expert guide: how to tune the rig of a yacht
Yachting Monthly
by Toby Heppell
2M ago
Ivar Dedekam is the author of Illustrated Sail & Rig Tuning brings us this guide on how to tune the rig of a yacht and make your sailing better Know how to rig a preventer system - the crew of this yacht got it wrong, resulting in a broken boom. Photo: Heather Prentice It is important to have a correctly tuned rig. Boats that have poorly tuned rigs are slower, point lower, heel more, make more leeway and may be more difficult to steer. Making changes can be dramatic on any class of boat. They will reduce crew fatigue, widen the skipper’s options and improve their reputation. Boat value is ..read more
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How to get your boat home if you experience an engine failure
Yachting Monthly
by Rachael Sprot
2M ago
We rely on the engine a huge amount, but when it stops, do you know how you would get yourself back on track and into harbour? Rachael Sprot works through the options Yachts engines are like bodies; we only appreciate them when they stop working. On more than one occasion last year, the engine on my Luders 36ft long-keeled sloop, Nimrod, reminded me not to take it for granted. But engine failure happens to us all at some point and the list of possible causes is long. Mechanical problems can be reduced with preventative maintenance and routine checks, but there are also many factors beyond our ..read more
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How to squeeze a yacht into a tight marina berth
Yachting Monthly
by James Stevens
2M ago
James Stevens considers a problem sent in by a Yachting Monthly reader who asks how to squeeze a yacht into a tight berth? Jane is on a cruising holiday on board Storm Petrel, her 10m yacht. The boat has a long fin keel and skeg. When engaging astern there is a strong prop kick to starboard but once the yacht is moving astern it is reasonably easy to handle. Jane has been the owner for five years. She has two crew who are both quite experienced. She is approaching a marina where she has been allocated an overnight berth A2, port side to if bow in. The marina is full except for her berth. To r ..read more
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How to optimise sail trim
Yachting Monthly
by Toby Heppell
2M ago
The author of Illustrated Sail & Rig Tuning, Ivar Dedekam, provides his expert advice on how best to optimise sail trim High performance cruising yachts that are comfortable, fast and easy to handle do exist! It is difficult to describe ‘correct’ sail shape, but the three most important things to consider are: sail draft (the fullness of the sail), draft position, and twist (controlled by the kicker/vang and leech tension). Sail draft Sail draft (chord depth) is an imaginary line from luff to leech called the chord. Chord depth can then be expressed as the ratio percentage between the maxi ..read more
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The sailing rules you can ignore… and those you can’t: an expert guide
Yachting Monthly
by Andy Pag
2M ago
Andy Du Port explores which rules need to be followed to the letter to avoid collisions at sea and considers those which can be safely ignored Saying ‘International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea’ is something of a mouthful, let alone learning all of them verbatim. Commonly called the ‘Colregs’, they are a fine example of comprehensive, logical and unambiguous rules which have been adopted worldwide by almost all countries with coastlines (the only two which have not are the Western Sahara and Taiwan). In case you are yawning already – ‘Not another sermon on the Colregs ..read more
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How do you recover a man overboard?
Yachting Monthly
by James Stevens
3M ago
James Stevens considers a problem sent in by a Yachting Monthly reader who asks how do you recover a man overboard Paul and Emma own a 10m yacht and are day sailing with Paul’s parents on a fine day in early May. The weather is fair so they are all wearing fleeces and lifejackets but no wet weather gear is needed. The wind is about 10 to 15 knots coming off the land. Paul’s father, Jack, was an enthusiastic sailor in his youth and is keen to get involved. He notices that the mainsail leech line is fouling the upper mainsheet block on the boom. Before Paul can do anything, Jack is standing on ..read more
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