Our Team!
Herbstalk Blog
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5M ago
Herbstalk has been on pause for a while, but thanks to the energy and enthusiasm of some new team members we can continue on, re-invigorated! Here are our lovely organizers for the upcoming Wintergreen Market (with our co-founder, Henry, sharing his bio soon!...) ​ Hi Herbstalk Community! My name is Vicki (Victoria Sargsyan) and I'm taking on a lot of the planning and organization work of Herbstalk, working with @steph_zabel and another new teammate (who you will meet soon...), and am running our social media accounts. You can also expect to find me on the other end of our email add ..read more
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What Happened to Herbstalk?
Herbstalk Blog
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11M ago
​A note from Herbstalk’s founder, Steph Zabel Hello dear community, It’s been quite a while since there have been any Herbstalk updates, and I very much apologize for that. As we approach the first weekend in June (which from 2012 to 2021 was always the Herbstalk weekend at the Armory) I wanted to share some thoughts on where we are in regards to hosting events. People have been reaching out to ask if Herbstalk is still in existence, and are wondering about what’s next. I really appreciate everyone who checks in about the events — I’m so glad that it’s something that people remember fondly ..read more
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Paraskeva: The Feast Day of a Goddess in Disguise
Herbstalk Blog
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2y ago
by Ray Lardie The cooling temperatures, the changing leaves: the end of October brings Samhain to mind for many people, but this ancient holiday was not celebrated in many parts of Europe. In Russia, a different holiday falls at this time of year: the Feast of Paraskeva. Who is St. Paraskeva? Who is Mokosh’? The Feast of Paraskeva occurs on October 28th and honors Saint Paraskeva, a martyr saint whose name means Friday. The Saint Paraskeva is venerated in Russia, however, took on many aspects of the Slavic earth goddess Mokosh’, also known as Mat’ Syra Zemlya, Damp Mother Earth. Thus in Rus ..read more
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Celebrating Lammas
Herbstalk Blog
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2y ago
by Marissa Myers With summer days getting shorter, signs of fall are becoming more apparent. Though the weather outside might be a different story, the earth around us shows signs that autumn is near, including grains being harvested, trees dropping their fruit, and the sun setting earlier at night.  All of this earthly excitement acts as a doorway, ushering in the pagan holiday of Lammas.  What is Lammas?  Lammas, sometimes referred to as Lughnasadh, is a time to celebrate the upcoming fall harvest. Depending on your spiritual practice, Lammas can also be (and traditionally ..read more
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Ostara: Traditions, Rituals, and Herbs for the Pagan Holiday
Herbstalk Blog
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3y ago
by Marissa Ranahan The arrival of March comes with the promise of spring. As we mark the beginning of the new season, many of us celebrate Ostara’s rejuvenating energy.  What is the History of Ostara? ​Little is known about the origins of Ostara. According to some historians, Ostara is an ancient Saxon and Celtic holiday celebrating Eostra, the fertility goddess. Many pagans believe Ostara symbolizes the day where Mother Earth and the Sun God were married. To honor this belief, pagans will make offerings to the sun and earth as a symbol of their sacred union.  How Can I Cel ..read more
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Imbolc: Traditions, Rituals, and Herbs for the Pagan Holiday
Herbstalk Blog
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3y ago
by Marissa Myers As hard as it is to believe, springtime is almost here. Even if it feels far away, the festival of Imbolc is just what we need to welcome in spring’s vibrant energy.  What Is the History of Imbolc?  In between the middle of the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox lies the Celtic festival of Imbolc. Dating back to pre-Christian times, Imbolc celebrations revolved around the Goddess Brigid. Ancient Celtic mythology explains that she was born with a flame in her head and immediately drank the milk of a mystical cow upon birth, which is where her common symbols of a ..read more
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Yule: Traditions, Rituals, & Herbs for the Pagan Holiday
Herbstalk Blog
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3y ago
by Marissa Myers The days are getting shorter, the weather is getting colder, and the magic of Yule is in the air. It’s the time of year that calls us to examine our intuition, showing us what needs to be brought out of the darkness and into the light.  What is the History of Yule?  Marking the first official day of winter, Yule (or Winter Solstice) is celebrated by pagans around the world, and is the shortest day of the year. In the 16th century, most Yule celebrations included merriment and festivities within the community. These celebrations included feasting, drinking, and dan ..read more
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All Souls Night, The Feast of the Dead, The Day of Remembrance…
Herbstalk Blog
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3y ago
by Marissa Myers The leaves have fallen, the air is crisp, and the mist has filled the early mornings. It’s the time of the year when the earth slowly “dies” and transitions into its winter slumber. For those celebrating Samhain, it’s a time to connect with the dead and honor those who have passed. The veil is thin, and the other side is calling for us to awaken the connection.  What is the History of Samhain?  Samhain is a pagan festival originating from Celtic spirituality. Known as a halfway point between the fall equinox and the winter solstice, it’s celebrated from October 31s ..read more
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Meet the Herbalist: Joye Williams of Joyefully Natural
Herbstalk Blog
by
3y ago
We are thrilled to bring back our “Meet the Herbalist” series where we feature our Herbstalk community members. This month it’s an honor to highlight Joye Williams of Joyfully Natural who has been a beloved vendor and teacher over the past several years at Herbstalk events. Enjoy our interview together and check out her website at www.joyefullynatural.com or connect with her on Instagram @joyefullynatural. You can also catch her class, “A Community Discussion on Natural Products” at the upcoming Virtual Herbstalk on Aug. 29th. ​ Thank you for sharing with us, Joye! Can you tell us a lit ..read more
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Celebrating Lammas: Traditions, Rituals, and Herbs for the Pagan Holiday
Herbstalk Blog
by
4y ago
by Marissa Ranahan With summer days getting shorter, signs of fall are becoming more apparent. Though the weather outside might be a different story, the earth around us shows signs that autumn is near, including grains being harvested, trees dropping their fruit, and the sun setting earlier at night.  All of this earthly excitement acts as a doorway, ushering in the pagan holiday of Lammas.  What is Lammas?  Lammas, sometimes referred to as Lughnasadh, is a time to celebrate the upcoming fall harvest. Depending on your spiritual practice, Lammas can also be (and traditional ..read more
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