Muhammad Ali and South Shields
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by Adam Bell
3y ago
Did you know that boxing legend Muhammad Ali (1942-2016) came to South Shields in the summer of 1977? Ali was the World Heavyweight Champion at the time so, as you can imagine, his Tyneside visit drew huge crowds. Muhammad Ali on an open top bus at South Shields Market Place, 1977. Photo by Fred Muddit of Fietscher Fotos, courtesy of South Tyneside Libraries. STH0005007. Many came hoping to catch a glimpse of their boxing hero, but Ali’s appeal extended beyond the world of boxing. For many, Muhammad Ali’s political convictions and campaigning helped to make him a standout figure, someone who ..read more
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Africans on Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by administrator
3y ago
Written by Bill Griffiths, Head of Programmes & Collections and Alex Croom, Keeper of Archaeology. During the Roman period Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site was an incredibly diverse place, with soldiers, and civilians from right across the Roman Empire based on the frontier. Some went on to make it their home, and some died and are buried here. The main evidence we have for this diversity is in the names of units that garrisoned the forts along the line of Hadrian’s Wall itself and across the wider environs that make up the World Heritage Site. Roman auxiliary units are often named after ..read more
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Facing the truth: A closer look at Nahem Shoa’s painting ‘Head of Desiree’
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by administrator
3y ago
Written by Rachel Booker, Communications Officer, Laing Art Gallery and Shipley Art Gallery Head of Desiree (2000-2001), oil on canvas,  Nahem Shoa (b. 1968). Gifted to the Laing Art Gallery by Nahem Shoa, 2017 In the Laing Art Gallery’s collection display, 100 Years of Collecting, Nahem Shoa’s striking oil painting Head of Desiree hangs on the back wall of the gallery. At 121cm high and 92cm wide, the portrait is not only noticeable for its impressive scale but also the dynamic positioning of the head along with the sensitive attention to the sitter’s ..read more
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The Forgotten War
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by Ana Flynn
3y ago
To commemorate VJ Day, Conservation Officer Ana Flynn shares the story of her grandpa Harry Gregory and the long, long road home from Burma. For most, the Second World War ended on 8 May 1945 with VE Day. For my grandpa and his family there was still no end in sight. My grandpa had not been home for 5 years and did not return until 1946. My grandpa, Harrold Harry (the story is, his mum got flustered at the Christening), at 6’2” was a gentle giant. He made miniature furniture to scale and teddy bears for the church fete. He was a mechanic and always smelt of engine grease. When he got home he w ..read more
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Recalling the opening of Segedunum Roman Fort to the public 20 years ago
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by admin
3y ago
Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum opened its doors to the public for the first time in June 2000. In June 2020, we were set to celebrate the Fort’s 20th anniversary in the venue, but as the coronavirus pandemic had already forced the closure of all our museums and galleries, we could only mark the occasion online, the real live celebrations postponed to a later date. On Monday 27 July 2020, Segedunum once again welcomed back its visitors. During lockdown, we have collected memories from our staff and Friends of the opening day in June 2000 which we would like to share with you here. If yo ..read more
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William Chapman Hewitson – Naturalist, Author, Illustrator, Benefactor and Oologist
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by Ian Bower
3y ago
Over the last few months I’ve had a chance to reflect on some of the fascinating authors whose works I encounter while performing my role as the librarian at the Great North Museum: Hancock Library. One of the names that crops up on a regular basis is that of William Chapman Hewitson. As well as being a writer on the natural world, his name appears as the benefactor who donated many of the rare books that belong to the Natural History Society of Northumbria’s wonderful library.  For this blog I thought I’d undertake some research into Hewitson. This is what I discovered. William Chapman H ..read more
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Meet Neville – Customer Service Assistant at Discovery Museum
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by admin
3y ago
Long-standing front of house staff member of Discovery Museum, Neville, shares what life is like inspiring the public with tales of local history, and his favourite object in the museum. What I do “I have been interested in history and how things work since childhood. I am a customer service assistant at the Discovery Museum, part of the front of house team. We’re the first point of contact with our visitors face to face; it’s my job to meet and greet people, tell them what’s on offer at the museum, direct them to facilities like the café, shops, toilet and suggest donations. In general, just ..read more
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From Hornel to Peploe: Early Modern Scottish Art in the Laing Art Gallery
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by admin
3y ago
Art historian and curator Alice Strang takes a look at early modern Scottish art in our collection. Edward Atkinson Hornel (1864-1933), The Little Mushroom Gatherers, 1902, Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle, TWCMS: C649 Edward Atkinson Hornel (1864-1933) was one of the celebrated ‘Glasgow Boys’ who were at the forefront of the Scottish art world of the late nineteenth-century. He was born in Bacchus Marsh, Australia but grew up in Kirkcudbright in Dumfries and Galloway. He trained at the Trustees’ Academy in Edinburgh and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. On his return to Scotland in ..read more
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The Hatton Gallery Print Collection
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by admin
3y ago
Written by Lizzie Jacklin, Keeper of Art, Hatton Gallery The Hatton Gallery’s permanent collection of over 3300 artworks includes objects ranging from paintings and sculptures to watercolours and posters. Around 1300 of these objects are prints. Sadly our plans to show a large group of prints from the collection in an exhibition this summer are on hold due to the current situation, but some of you might be interested to read more about our print collection in the meantime. A (very!) brief introduction to artists’ prints Prints are works of art made by printing onto a surface (usually paper) fr ..read more
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The Lead Shrine
Tyne & Wear Museums Blog
by Alex Croom
3y ago
Keeper of Archaeology, Alex Croom takes an in-depth look at the Lead Shrine, on display at Segedunum Roman Fort & Museum. This lead shrine from Wallsend Roman Fort is one of only three in Britain that still retain its central figure, and the only one complete with its doors. It is made of five separate elements, each originally cast in a clay mould. The figure inside is Mercury, the god of trade and commercial success, story-telling, communication and anything requiring skill and dexterity, as well as the herald and messenger of the gods, and was therefore the patron of merchants, carrier ..read more
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