Unveiling the Ongoing Impact of Military Services
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Karima Allache
2w ago
In Their Own Voices: Stories From Canadian Veterans and Their Families is a different kind of oral history project about war and military service. Most exhibitions or books about the military focus on a particular conflict or period of service, and conclude when hostilities end or when a soldier takes off their uniform and becomes a civilian again. This is where In Their Own Voices begins. The project is built on the belief that the impacts of war and military continue long after a veteran’s military service ends in ways that can be intimate and far-ranging. CWM 20080028-001_IMG_8641a – Georg ..read more
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Portrait of a Prime Minister: Paul Martin
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Xavier Gélinas
1M ago
Although Paul Martin was Canada’s Prime Minister for a relatively brief period, from December 2003 to February 2006, he had a major impact on the political and economic history of the country. Born in Windsor, Ontario, in 1938, he was long viewed as the son of the “other” Paul Martin, a political heavyweight. Paul Martin, Sr. (1903–1992) was a federal Liberal Party MP for 35 years before being named a senator, then High Commissioner (ambassador) to London. In addition to being a high-ranking minister, he also campaigned to become party leader on three separate occasions. Button for Paul Marti ..read more
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A Long-Awaited Synthesis: The Far Northeast
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Pierre M. Desrosiers
3M ago
The Far Northeast: 3000 BP to Contact The Far Northeast: 3000 BP to Contact is a long-awaited synthesis representing decades of research in the field of Archaeology across the North Atlantic region of Canada and the United States. It could not have been a better choice as we marked the 50th anniversary of the Mercury Series in 2022. The editors, Kenneth R. Holyoke and M. Gabriel Hrynick, are stellar examples of this dynamic discipline. The 39 contributors were equally enthusiastic to be part of this important edited volume, attesting to the steadfast interest in the Museum monograph series ..read more
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Remembering the Korean War
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Karima Allache
3M ago
In July 1953, the Korean War armistice was negotiated between the United States and the Soviet Union, marking the end of eight arduous years of conflict between the two superpowers. The Korean War is being remembered with a new exhibition titled Canada, Korea and the War. This exhibition explores not only the War itself, but also the enduring relationship forged between Canada and South Korea. Through personal accounts, photographs, and select objects, this new exhibition shares the stories of Canadian soldiers, nursing sisters, and Korean Canadians, from the early 1950s to the present day. C ..read more
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Bone Detective – A Box of Secrets
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Janet Young
5M ago
The metal box in situ prior to excavation (Mortimer, 2017) On the last day of excavations in the lot behind 62 Sparks Street, while digging a hole to get a good stratigraphic profile of an area of disturbance, a hollow thump was heard. Further investigation by lead archaeologist Ben Mortimer (Matrix Heritage) revealed that beneath a darkened deposit of sand, cinder, clinker, coal and refuse, sat a strange metal box. It was closed with a lock, suggesting that it may have been some sort of safe or insulated chest, and that it possibly dated back to the late 19th or early 20th centuries. Remova ..read more
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Five Amazing Facts about Trivial Pursuit – The most successful Canadian board game of all time
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Jenny Ellison
6M ago
Trivial Pursuit co-creator Chris Haney holds a copy of the original sketch for the game. Getty Images 543860724. One afternoon in December 1979, Montréal journalists Chris Haney and Scott Abbott sketched out an idea for a board game. It would have a pinwheel-shaped board and six thematic categories covering a broad cross-section of general knowledge about geography, science, entertainment, literature and sport, among other topics. By the time it was finished, the game consisted of 6,000 questions (six per card) and could be played by two to 24 players. Each player or team must work their way ..read more
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Accessibility and Inclusiveness: Evolving Resources for People Impacted by Blindness
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Chloé Ouellet-Riendeau
6M ago
The Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) Foundation’s collection sheds light on the ongoing creativity of designers who enable everyone to interact autonomously with the world. In 2020, the Canadian Museum of History acquired this collection of 101 objects. It showcases just over a century of progress in the resources and tools available to people impacted by blindness. Ingenuity is the name of the game to facilitate access to information, communicate more effectively, get around safely, or simply have fun. This collection includes Braille learning tools, talking book reading devic ..read more
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War is not a Game
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Karima Allache
7M ago
Have you ever watched people play chess — noticed the concentration, focus and strategy involved in every move? The give, the take, and the earnest frustration and exhilaration can be read on participants’ faces. Many games are like that, whether played on a board or a screen. Strategy is involved and there are inevitable winners and losers — there are no prizes for participation! Historian Andrew Burtch, who is featured in this edition of Kudos!, has long been fascinated with games that require strategy and planning. Over the years, he witnessed groups of middle- and high-school-age youth sur ..read more
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Artifactuality Podcast: Prince of Plastic – How Karim Rashid advanced democratic design
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Daniel Neill
9M ago
Karim Rashid Why can’t the objects we use every day be beautiful, unique and useful? This is the question that drives Karim Rashid, an industrial designer known for his affordable designs including the Oh Chair and the Garbo garbage can. Rashid shares stories about his early influences, adolescence and career in “The Prince of Plastic.” It’s an episode of Artifactuality, a podcast series that imagines a museum of the future made up entirely of the stories we tell each other. Download and subscribe to Artifactuality: Stories From the Museum of the Future wherever you get your podcasts. Why ar ..read more
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A Silk Robe and Ten Thousand Porcelain Dishes: Links Between Early Canada and Asia
Canadian Museum of History Blog
by Jean-François Lozier
11M ago
Chinese export porcelain cup and saucer found at the wreck site of the Machault, a French ship that sank in the Restigouche River estuary (Quebec) in 1760. On loan from Parks Canada. In 1624, French explorer Jean Nicollet carried “a robe of Chinese damask, adorned with flowers and multi-coloured birds” on his journey to the Great Lakes, apparently to ensure that he had something appropriate to wear should he reach China and encounter subjects of the Chongzhen Emperor. This anecdote, which will be familiar to readers who have seen it retold in a classic Heritage Minute, can be read as evidenc ..read more
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